mood

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See also: Mood and mööd

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mood, mode, mod, from Old English mōd (heart, mind, spirit, mood, temper; courage; arrogance, pride; power, violence), from Proto-Germanic *mōdą, *mōdaz (sense, courage, zeal, anger), from Proto-Indo-European *moh₁-, *meh₁- (endeavour, will, temper). Cognate with Scots mude, muid (mood, courage, spirit, temper, disposition), Saterland Frisian Moud (courage), West Frisian moed (mind, spirit, courage, will, intention), Dutch moed (courage, bravery, heart, valor), German Low German Mood (mind, heart, courage), German Mut (courage, braveness, heart, spirit), Danish mod (courage, heart, bravery), Swedish mod (courage, heart, bravery), Icelandic móður (wrath, grief, moodiness), Latin mōs (will, humour, wont, inclination, mood), Russian сметь (smetʹ, to dare, venture).

Noun[edit]

mood (plural moods)

  1. A mental or emotional state, composure.
    Synonyms: composure, humor, spirit, temperament
    I've been in a bad mood since I dumped my boyfriend.
  2. Emotional character (of a work of music, literature, or other art).
    • 1979, Judith Glassman, The Year in Music, 1979 (→ISBN):
      Whatever the mood of her music, funky or romantic, upbeat or blue, sophisticated or simple, her fans get the message. And as long as the word comes from Natalie, they adore it, turning every one of her albums to gold or platinum.
  3. A sullen, gloomy or angry mental state; a bad mood.
    Synonyms: huff (informal), pet, temper
    Antonyms: good humour, good mood, good spirits
    He's in a mood with me today.
    • 2010, Michelle West, City of Night: A Novel of the House War, Penguin (→ISBN):
      Rath was clearly in a mood, and only Jay could fix that. They found Carver first. Rath was even less amused to see Carver in the drill room than he had been to find Duster. He grabbed Carver with his free hand, and dragged him out.
    • 2018, Catherine Lievens, Beacon in the Darkness, eXtasy Books (→ISBN), page 93:
      Joel was obviously in a mood, and if he was going to start yelling, Alex would rather be alone. “What did I do this time?” “It's more what you didn't do, idiot.”
  4. A disposition to do something, a state of mind receptive or disposed to do something.
    Synonyms: huff, frame of mind
    I'm not in the mood for running today.
    • 2018, Rebecca Chastain, A Fistful of Frost, Mind Your Muse Books (→ISBN):
      "The Placer SPCA brings by some kittens and puppies, and I do my best to get everyone tipsy and in a donating mood."
  5. A prevalent atmosphere, attitude, or feeling.
    A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    • 1994, Kenneth Fearing, Complete Poems, page xxvi:
      This was the mood that led him to deny to Mainstream, the successor to the New Masses , permission to reprint “Reading, Writing, and the Rackets.” This was the mood that, when he was invited to a meeting to draft a letter of protest []
    • 2010, Richard J. Murnane, John B. Willett, Methods Matter, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 8:
      By the early 1970s, more than 50,000 American deaths and the accompanying failed foreign-policy objectives had changed the country's mood.
  6. (slang) A familiar, relatable feeling, experience, or thing.
    Synonym: big mood
    • 2019, Kris Ripper, Runaway Road Trip: (A Definitely-Not-Romantic Adventure):
      “I'm only here for a night. I'm road tripping with a friend and he decided we needed a queer bar, stat.” “Oh, that's a whole mood.”
    • 2020, Birgit Breidenbach, Aesthetic and Philosophical Reflections on Mood: Stimmung and Modernity, Routledge (→ISBN)
      [] For academics, not being familiar with new phrases that your students cofindently wield is a whole mood. []
    • 2020, Cynthia St. Aubin, Love Bites (Oliver-Heber Books):
      He'd drawn a variety of designs on the white rubber toes. “Nice shoes,” I said. “Likewise,” he said, glancing down at my rockabilly-red peep toe pumps. “Those kicks are a whole-ass mood.” Whether Steven liked them on me or might like to []
  7. (obsolete, Northern England and Scotland) Courage, heart, valor; also vim and vigor.
    He fought with mood in many a bloody slaught.
    He tried to lift the fallen tree with all his main and mood, but he couldn't.
    • 1440, O lord omnipotentː
      She blew her horn, with main and mood.
Usage notes[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alteration of mode, from Latin modus.

Noun[edit]

mood (plural moods)

  1. (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
    Synonyms: grammatical mood, mode
    The most common mood in English is the indicative.
Hyponyms[edit]
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Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Mode.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mood (genitive moe, partitive moodi)

  1. fashion
  2. tradition
  3. appearance, style
  4. (partitive) style, variety, sort, type
    Mis moodi mees sa siis oled?What type of man are you then?

Declension[edit]

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Manx[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mood

  1. second-person singular of mysh
    about you

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English mōd.

Noun[edit]

mood

  1. Alternative form of mode (intellect, mood, will, courage, nature)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French mode.

Noun[edit]

mood

  1. Alternative form of mode (grammatical mood)