temperament

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French tempérament, from Latin temperamentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛmpəɹəmənt/, /ˈtɛmpɹəmənt/, /ˈtɛmpəɹmənt/[1][2]

Noun[edit]

temperament (countable and uncountable, plural temperaments)

  1. (obsolete) A moderate and proportionable mixture of elements or ingredients in a compound; the condition in which elements are mixed in their proper proportions.
    • 1624, John Donne, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Meditation XVIII., in The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne, ed. Charles M. Coffin, New York: Modern Library (1952), pp. 442-444:
      If I will aske meere Philosophers, what the soule is, I shall finde amongst them, that will tell me, it is nothing, but the temperament and harmony, and just and equall composition of the Elements in the body, which produces all those faculties which we ascribe to the soule […]
  2. (obsolete) Any state or condition as determined by the proportion of its ingredients or the manner in which they are mixed; consistence, composition; mixture.
  3. A person's usual manner of thinking, behaving or reacting.
  4. A tendency to become irritable or angry.
  5. (music) The altering of certain intervals from their correct values in order to improve the moving from key to key.
  6. (psychology) Individual differences in behavior that are biologically based and are relatively independent of learning, system of values and attitudes.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ temperament” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ temperament”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin temperamentum

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

temperament m (plural temperaments)

  1. temperament

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French tempérament, from Latin temperamentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tem‧pe‧ra‧ment

Noun[edit]

temperament n (plural temperamenten, diminutive temperamentje n)

  1. (psychology) the usual mood of a person, or typical manner of thinking, behaving, and acting; temperament, temper, mood
    Oorspronkelijk waren in de Griekse oudheid de temperamenten de naam voor vier persoonlijkheidstypen: het sanguïnische, flegmatische, cholerische en melancholische temperament.[2]
    Originally, in Greek antiquity, the temperaments were the names of the four personality types: the sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholy temperaments.
  2. temperament: a tendency to become irritable or angry, temper
  3. (music) temperament: a specific system of note pitches of a musical instrument

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian temperamento.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɛm.pɛ.raˈmɛnt/

Noun[edit]

temperament m (plural temperamenti)

  1. temperament, disposition

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin temperamentum

Noun[edit]

temperament n (definite singular temperamentet, indefinite plural temperament or temperamenter, definite plural temperamenta or temperamentene)

  1. temperament
  2. a temperamental nature

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin temperamentum

Noun[edit]

temperament n (definite singular temperamentet, indefinite plural temperament, definite plural temperamenta)

  1. temperament
  2. a temperamental nature

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin temperamentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɛm.pɛˈra.mɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -amɛnt
  • Syllabification: tem‧pe‧ra‧ment

Noun[edit]

temperament m inan (diminutive temperamencik)

  1. temperament, character

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • temperament in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • temperament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French tempérament, from Latin temperamentum.

Noun[edit]

temperament n (plural temperamente)

  1. temperament

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Temperament, from Latin temperamentum.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /temperǎment/
  • Hyphenation: tem‧pe‧ra‧ment

Noun[edit]

temperàment m (Cyrillic spelling темпера̀мент)

  1. (psychology) temperament

Declension[edit]

References[edit]