mental

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See also: mentál

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French mental, from Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns (the mind).

Adjective[edit]

mental (comparative more mental, superlative most mental)

  1. Of or relating to the mind or an intellectual process.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter VI, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, [], the neurotic victims of mental cirrhosis, the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!"
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. (colloquial, comparable) Insane, mad, crazy.
    He is the most mental freshman I've seen yet.  He went mental on us.
  3. (colloquial, Britain, comparable) Enjoyable or fun, especially in a frenetic way.
    That was a mental party last night.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

1720-30; from Latin mentum (chin) + -al.

Adjective[edit]

mental (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Of or relating to the chin or median part of the lower jaw, genial.
    Synonyms: genial, genian
    the mental nerve;  the mental region
  2. (biology) Of or relating to the chin-like or lip-like structure.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mental (plural mentals)

  1. (zoology) A plate or scale covering the mentum or chin of a fish or reptile.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

mental (epicene, plural mentales)

  1. mental

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to ment +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

mental (masculine and feminine plural mentals)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English mental hospital.

Noun[edit]

mental

  1. A hospital facility designed to treat persons with serious mental disorders, as opposed to disorders of the body; a mental hospital.

Verb[edit]

mental

  1. To send or commit to a mental hospital.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Late Latin mentālis (of the mind, mental), from Latin mēns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental (feminine singular mentale, masculine plural mentaux, feminine plural mentales)

  1. mental (relating to the mind)

Noun[edit]

mental m (uncountable)

  1. mind
    Elle a un mental d'acier.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (plural mentais)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin mentālis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental (not comparable)

  1. mental

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin mentalis, from mens.

Adjective[edit]

mental (neuter singular mentalt, definite singular and plural mentale)

  1. mental

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin mentalis, from mens.

Adjective[edit]

mental (neuter singular mentalt, definite singular and plural mentale)

  1. mental

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mental m, f (plural mentais, comparable)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin mentālis, from Latin mēns; equivalent to mente +‎ -al.

Adjective[edit]

mental (plural mentales)

  1. mental

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Late Latin mentalis, from Latin mens.

Adjective[edit]

mental

  1. mental, pertaining to the mind

Declension[edit]

Inflection of mental
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular mental
Neuter singular mentalt
Plural mentala
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 mentale
All mentala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related terms[edit]