send

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See also: Send, SEND, and Sënd

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛnd/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English senden, from Old English sendan (to send, cause to go), from Proto-Germanic *sandijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sont-eye- (to cause to go), causative of *sent- (to walk, travel). Cognate with Saterland Frisian seende (to send), Dutch zenden (to send), German senden (to send), Danish and Norwegian sende (to send), Swedish sända (to send), Icelandic senda (to send). Related also to Old English sand, sond (a sending, mission, message). See also sith. The noun is from the verb.

Verb[edit]

send (third-person singular simple present sends, present participle sending, simple past and past participle sent)

  1. (transitive) To make something (such as an object or message) go from one place to another.
    • 2013 June 14, Jonathan Freedland, “Obama's once hip brand is now tainted”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 1, page 18:
      Now we are liberal with our innermost secrets, spraying them into the public ether with a generosity our forebears could not have imagined. Where we once sent love letters in a sealed envelope, or stuck photographs of our children in a family album, now such private material is despatched to servers and clouds operated by people we don't know and will never meet.
    Every day at two o'clock, he sends his secretary out to buy him a coffee.
    to send a message, or a letter
  2. (slang) To excite, delight, or thrill (someone).
  3. To bring to a certain condition.
    • 1913, D. H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 9
      “I suppose,” blurted Clara suddenly, “she wants a man.”
      The other two were silent for a few moments.
      “But it’s the loneliness sends her cracked,” said Paul.
  4. (intransitive) To dispatch an agent or messenger to convey a message, or to do an errand.
    • Bible, 2 Kings vi. 32
      See ye how this son of a murderer hath sent to take away my head?
    Seeing how ill she was, we sent for a doctor at once.
  5. To cause to be or to happen; to bestow; to inflict; to grant; sometimes followed by a dependent proposition.
  6. (nautical) To pitch.
    • (Can we date this quote by Totten and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The ship sends forward so violently as to endanger her masts.
  7. (climbing, transitive) To make a successful free ascent (i.e. not relying on gear) of a sport climbing route.
    She finally sent the 12a after hours of failed attempts.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

send (plural sends)

  1. (telecommunications) An operation in which data is transmitted.
    • 1992, Tara M. Madhyastha, A Portable System for Data Sonification, page 71:
      In the sonification of the PDE code, notes are scattered throughout a wide pitch range, and sends and receives are relatively balanced; although in the beginning of the application there are bursts of sends []
  2. (nautical) Alternative form of scend
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. C. Russell to this entry?)
    • (Can we date this quote by Longfellow and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the send of the sea
  3. (Scotland) A messenger, especially one sent to fetch the bride.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *tsjam tam, from Proto-Indo-European *kiom tom, a sequence of two pronouns in neuter of which the first is related to 'se'.[2] Alternatively from Proto-Albanian *tśe enta, literally 'this being', the first element from *kwe- (how, what), or *k̂(e) (this), while the second one being a gerundive or a participle of a disused verb, close to Latin -ēns (participal ending), Medieval Latin being (hence Italian ente (entity, body, being)), and Ancient Greek ὤν (ṓn) (present participle).

Noun[edit]

send m

  1. thing, object

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fialuur i voghel Sccyp e ltinisct (Small Dictionary of Albanian and Latin), page 139 : senn, by P. Jak Junkut, 1895, Sckoder
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “send”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, page 394

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

send

  1. imperative of sende

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

send

  1. imperative of sende

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

send

  1. imperative of senda

Old Norse[edit]

Participle[edit]

send

  1. inflection of senda:
    1. strong feminine nominative singular
    2. strong neuter nominative/accusative plural

Verb[edit]

send

  1. second-person singular active imperative of senda