cur

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: cúr and cûr

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English kur, curre, of Middle Low German [Term?] or North Germanic origin. Compare Middle Dutch corre (house dog; watch-dog), dialectal Swedish kurre (a dog). Compare also Old Norse kurra (to growl; grumble), Middle Low German korren (to growl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur (plural curs)

  1. (dated or humorous) A contemptible or inferior dog.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      A fals double tunge is more fiers and fell
      Then Cerberus the cur couching in the kenel of hel;
      Wherof hereafter, I thinke for to write,
      Of fals double tunges in the diſpite.
    • 1613, Shakespeare, The Famous History of the Life of King Henry VIII, Act 2, scene 4
      you have many enemies, that know not why they are so, but, like to village-curs, bark when their fellows do.
    • 1897, Joseph Conrad, “II”, in An Outpost of Progress:
      Makola, a civilized nigger, was very neat in his person. He threw the soapsuds skilfully over a wretched little yellow cur he had, then turning his face to the agent's house, he shouted from the distance, "All the men gone last night!"
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 25
      "You have no more spirit than a mongrel cur. You lie down on the ground and ask people to trample on you."
  2. (dated or humorous) A detestable person.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin culus. Compare Romanian cur.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. (slang, referring to the anus) ass

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin currō. Compare Romanian cure, cur (modern curge, curg).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cur

  1. I run.
  2. I flow.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin cūrō. Compare archaic/regional Romanian cura, cur.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cur (past participle curatã)

  1. I clean.
Related terms[edit]

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cārus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cur m (feminine cuora)

  1. dear, beloved

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore, French coeur, Old Portuguese cor, Old Spanish cuer.

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. heart

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur m (genitive singular as substantive cuir, genitive as verbal noun curtha)

  1. verbal noun of cuir
  2. sowing, planting; tillage
  3. burial
  4. setting, laying
  5. course; round
  6. (of implements) set

Declension[edit]

Substantive
Verbal noun

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cur chur gcur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "cur" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “cur” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “cur” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin quūr, quōr, from Proto-Italic *kʷōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷōr, having undergone pre-resonant and monosyllabic lengthening from *kʷor (where), from *kʷos (interrogative determiner) +‎ *-r (adverbial suffix). For similar lengthening effect, compare to *bʰōr. For other Indo-European cognates, compare:

See also quirquir (wherever(?)).[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cūr (not comparable)

  1. why, for what reason, wherefore, to what purpose, from what motive
    Cur in terra iaces?
    Why are you lying on the ground?
    • 19 BC, Vergilius, Aeneis; Book XI, from line 424
      Cur ante tubam tremor occupat artus?
      Why before the trumpet (of war), fear seizes your limbs?

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cur in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cur in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cur in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • how came it that...: quid causae fuit cur...?
  • cūr” on page 519/1-2 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “cūr”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 155-156
  2. ^ Bender, Harold H. (1921), “kur̃”, in A Lithuanian Etymological Index, Princeton: Princeton University Press, page 125

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A highly suppletive verb with forms derived from two already suppletive verbs.

Verb[edit]

cur (verbal noun cur, coyrt)

  1. put
    Cur y muc shen magh hoshiaght.Put that pig out first.
  2. give

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cur chur gur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Megleno-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin culus.

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. (slang) asshole (anus)

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. Alternative form of curre

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish caur, from Proto-Celtic *karuts.

Noun[edit]

cur m (genitive curad, nominative plural curaid)

  1. hero, warrior
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 15, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:
      Fo chích curad
      crechtaig, cathbuadaig, at comsa mac Findchoeme frim. [] Magen curad,
      cride n-ega, eithre n-ela,
      eirr trén tressa, trethan ágach,
      cain tarb tnúthach.
      Under the breast of the hero
      covered in wounds, victorious in battle, you are the son of Findchoem who is equal to me. [] Dwelling of a hero,
      heart of ice, plumage of a swan
      strong chariot-hero of battle, warlike sea,
      beautiful fierce bull.

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: curadh

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cur chur cur
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Romagnol[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur f pl

  1. plural of cùra

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin culus, from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover). Compare Italian culo, French cul.

Noun[edit]

cur n (plural cururi)

  1. (slang, vulgar, referring to the anus) asshole
    O să-mi bag pula în curul tău.I'm gonna put my cock in your ass.
    Synonyms: anus, dos, fund, popou, șezut
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

cur

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of cura (to clean)

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur m (genitive singular cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of cuir
  2. placing, setting, sending, sowing
  3. laying, pouring
  4. falling of snow, raining
  5. throwing

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cur chur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “cur”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN