cur

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See also: cúr and cûr

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English curre (compare Middle Dutch corre ‎(house dog)), shortened from Middle English curdogge or kurdogge, a compound whose second element is clearly dogge ‎(dog). The first element is probably from Old Norse kurra ‎(to growl, grumble) and related to Middle Low German korren ‎(to growl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur ‎(plural curs)

  1. (archaic) A mongrel or inferior dog.
  2. (archaic) A detestable person.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin culus. Compare Daco-Romanian cur.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. (slang, referring to the anus) ass

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin currō. Compare Daco-Romanian cure, cur (modern curge, curg).

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cur

  1. I run.
  2. I flow.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin cūrō. Compare archaic/regional Daco-Romanian cura, cur.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cur (past participle curatã)

  1. I clean.
Related terms[edit]

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cārus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cur m ‎(feminine cuora)

  1. dear, beloved

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore, French coeur, Old Portuguese cor, Old Spanish cuer.

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. heart

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur m ‎(genitive as substantive cuir, genitive as verbal noun curtha)

  1. sowing
  2. verbal noun of cuir

Declension[edit]

As substantive
As verbal noun

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cur chur gcur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Latin quūr, quōr, from Proto-Italic *kʷōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷōr, having undergone pre-resonant and monosyllabic lengthening from *kʷor ‎(where), from *kʷos ‎(interrogative determiner) +‎ *-r ‎(adverbial suffix). For similar lengthening effect, compare to *bʰōr. For other Proto-Indo-European cognates, compare:

See also quirquir ‎(wherever(?)).[1][2]

Adverb[edit]

cūr (not comparable)

  1. why, for what reason, wherefore, to what purpose, from what motive
    Cur in terra iaces?
    Why are you lying on the ground?
    • Vergilius, Aeneis; Book XI, from line 424
      Cur ante tubam tremor occupat artus?
      Why before the trumpet (of war), fear seizes your limbs?

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “cūr” in Michiel de Vaan (2008), Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, pages 155-156
  2. ^ “kur̃” in Harold Herman Bender's A Lithuanian Etymological Index. Princeton University Press, 1921.

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

cur

  1. rafsi of curnu.

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cuirid, from older fo·ceird, do·cuirethar.

Verb[edit]

cur

  1. put
    Cur y muc shen magh hoshiaght. ― Put that pig out first.
  2. give

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cur chur gur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Megleno-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin culus

Noun[edit]

cur

  1. (slang, referring to the anus) asshole

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin culus. Compare Italian culo, French cul.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur n (plural cururi)

  1. (slang, vulgar, referring to the anus) asshole
    O să-mi bag pula în curul tău.

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

cur m ‎(genitive singular cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of cuir

Derived terms[edit]