cul

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See also: cúl, cùl, cûl, and cúl-

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cūlus, from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural culs)

  1. (anatomy) bottom, behind, butt
  2. (vulgar) anus
  3. (figuratively) the bottom, rear (of an object)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *kʉl, from Proto-Celtic *koilos (thin) (compare Old Irish cáel, Welsh cul).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cul

  1. narrow

Antonyms[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cul

  1. second-person singular imperative of culit

French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French cul, from Old French, from Latin cūlus, from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural culs)

  1. (anatomy, vulgar) butt, bum, ass, arse
  2. (vulgar) anus; arsehole; asshole
    • 1785, Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, Les 120 journées de Sodome, ou l'École du libertinage
      Elle a treize ans et son frère quinze; ils vont chez un homme qui contraint le frère à foutre sa sœur, et qui fout alternativement en cul tantôt le garçon, tantôt la fille, pendant qu'ils sont aux prises ensemble.
      She's thirteen and her brother's fifteen; they go to a man who forces the brother to fuck his sister, and who fucks in the ass, in turn, the boy and the girl, while they both struggle together.
  3. (figuratively) the bottom, rear (of an object)
  4. (informal) sex; sexual intercourse
    Le cul mène le monde.
    Sex rules the world.
  5. (informal, France) good luck or fortune
    Ils ont du cul.
    They are lucky.
  6. (France, slang) roach (butt of a marijuana cigarette)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cūlus (anus), from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-.

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural cui)

  1. (Gherdëina, vulgar slang) ass, bottom, buttocks, butt

Lombard[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • cuu (Milanese classical orthography)
  • cüü, cüül (Ticinese and Western modern orthographies)
  • cül (Eastern modern orthographies)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cūlus (anus), from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kyːl/, [kyː(l)] (Western)
  • IPA(key): /kyːl/, [ky(ː)l] (Eastern)

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural cui)

  1. (vulgar, anatomy) butt, arse, bum

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French coille, from Latin cōleus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cul m

  1. a testicle, male genital ball
  2. a vegetal reproductive bulb
  3. a marble (for games)
  4. the male member, penis

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: kul

Further reading[edit]

  • cul”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “cul”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin cūlus.

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural culs or culs)

  1. (vulgar) arse; ass; anus

Descendants[edit]


Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Only attested in glosses. Maybe from Proto-Celtic *kʷolu- (wheel), derived from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to turn). Compare words derived from the same root: Latin colus (distaff), Ancient Greek πόλος (pólos, axis), Old Church Slavonic коло (kolo, wheel).[1][2]

Noun[edit]

cul (gender unknown, genitive unattested ?, no plural)

  1. chariot, or some part of the chariot, most likely a wheel

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vendryes, Joseph (1959–96) Lexique Étymologique de l'Irlandais Ancien [Etymological lexicon of Old Irish] (in French), volume C, Dublin, Paris: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, page C-283
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “Kʷolu-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN

Further reading[edit]


Mirandese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

cul m (feminine cula, masculine plural culs, feminine plural culas)

  1. Contraction of cun l (with the).

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

cul m (plural culi)

  1. Alternative form of cuło

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *kʉl, Proto-Celtic *koilos (thin) (compare Old Irish cáel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cul (feminine singular cul, plural culion, equative culed, comparative culach, superlative culaf)

  1. narrow

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cul gul nghul chul
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.