eang

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Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish eng (track, trace).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

eang f (genitive singular eanga, nominative plural eangaí)

  1. track, footprint
  2. gusset
  3. splice, strip
  4. notch; nick, groove

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
eang n-eang heang not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • “eang” at the Historical Irish Corpus, 1600–1926 of the Royal Irish Academy.
  • “eang” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 278.
  • "eang" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “eang” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “eang” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh ehang, from Proto-Brythonic *ehang, from Proto-Celtic *exs-angus (not narrow), from *exs- (from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs (out); see ech-) and *angus (narrow) (from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énǵʰus (narrow)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

eang (feminine singular eang, plural eang, equative ehanged, comparative ehangach, superlative ehangaf)

  1. wide, broad, extensive
    Antonyms: cul, cyfyng

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
eang unchanged unchanged heang
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “eang”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies