blinder

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blind +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blinder

  1. comparative form of blind: more blind
    • 1830, William Pashley, The Voice of Reason in Defence of the Christian Faith:
      Ye who arrogate to yourselves that ye see more, or at least are not so blind as others; in your unbelieving conduct, allow me to say, ye are blinder than others; ye are even blinder than the most ignorant and illiterate.

Noun[edit]

blinder (plural blinders)

  1. Something that blinds.
  2. A bag or cloth put over the head of a difficult horse while it is being handled or mounted.
  3. A screen attached to a horse's bridle preventing it from being able to see things to its side.
    • 1969, Kenzaburō Ōe, A Personal Matter, translated by John Nathan, New York: Grove Press, Chapter 5, p. 84,
      From both sides of his head a blackness swiftly grew like blinders on a horse and darkly narrowed his field of vision.
    • 1978 Edward Said, Orientalism, New York: Vinatage, 2003, Chapter 3, Part I, p. 207,
      Orientalism itself, furthermore, was an exclusively male province; like so many professional guilds during the modern period, it viewed itself and its subject matter with sexist blinders.
  4. (Britain, slang) An exceptional performance.
    He played a blinder this afternoon on the cricket ground.
    • 1992, Glyn Maxwell, "Out of the Rain" in Boys at Twilight: Poems 1990 to 1995, New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, p. 91,
      And we asked the blue winger, who in our game / had played what they call a blinder, to help out
  5. (slang) A bout of heavy drinking, a bender.
    • 1985, John Maxton, Hansard, 2 May, 1985, [2]
      If a man goes out on a blinder, he might be charged with being drunk and incapable and therefore have a criminal record, although he is an honourable man.
  6. (theater) A bright light used to blind the audience temporarily during a scene change.
    • 1992, The Lighting Journal (page 9)
      When the 'blinders' are switched off, and the audience's eyes given time to re-adjust, the new scene is in place []

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

blinder (third-person singular simple present blinders, present participle blindering, simple past and past participle blindered)

  1. (transitive) To fit (a horse) with blinders.
  2. (transitive, figuratively, by extension) To obstruct the vision of.
    • 1958, Sylvia Plath, "Above the Oxbow" in The Collected Poems, New York: Harper & Row, p. 88,
      [] We climb in hopes / Of such seeing up the leaf-shuttered escarpments, / Blindered by green, under a green-grained sky
    • 1986, Tessa Albert Warschaw, Rich is Better: How Women Can Bridge the Gap Between Wanting and Having It All — Financially, Emotionally, Professionally, Penguin, p. 248,
      They think they're being focussed when they're really just blindering their eyes, as a farmer would a plough horse, to ways of getting to their goal faster.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blinde +‎ -er.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /blɛ̃.de/

Verb[edit]

blinder

  1. to armor; to reinforce

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italian: blindare
  • Portuguese: blindar
  • Spanish: blindar

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blinder

  1. comparative degree of blind

Adjective[edit]

blinder

  1. inflection of blind:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

Adjective[edit]

blinder

  1. blind
  2. invisible, obscure

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From blin +‎ -der.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

blinder m (plural blinderau)

  1. (uncountable) tiredness, weariness, fatigue
  2. (countable) trouble, affliction

Derived terms[edit]

  • blinderog (weary, tired)
  • blinderus (wearisome, tiring; troublesome, troubling)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
blinder flinder mlinder unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.