cor

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Cor, cór, ćor, còr, côr, cor-, and Cor.

Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A minced oath or dialectical variant of God.

Interjection[edit]

cor

  1. (Cockney Britain) Expression of surprise.
    • Cor blimey!
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter VII:
      “I don’t get this,” she said. “How do you mean it’s gone?” “It’s been pinched.” “Things don’t get pinched in country-houses.” “They do if there’s a Wilbert Cream on the premises. He’s a klep-whatever-it-is,” I said, and thrust Jeeves’s letter on her. She perused it with an interested eye and having mastered its contents said, “Cor chase my Aunt Fanny up a gum tree,” adding that you never knew what was going to happen next these days.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hebrew כֹּר

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor (plural cors)

  1. (historical units of measure) Various former units of volume, particularly:
    1. A Hebrew unit of liquid volume, about equal to 230 L or 60 gallons.
    2. Synonym of homer: approximately the same volume as a dry measure.
    3. A roughly equivalent Phoenician unit of volume.
Synonyms[edit]
Meronyms[edit]
  • (liquid volume): log (1720 cor); cab, kab (1180 cor); hin (160 cor); bath (110 cor)
  • (dry volume): See homer

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Provençal cor, from Latin cor, from Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-.

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cors)

  1. heart
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός(khorós).

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cors)

  1. chorus

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cor, corn, from Latin cornu, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cors)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. corn (of the foot)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese coor, from Latin color, colōrem.

Noun[edit]

cor f (plural cores)

  1. color, hue

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cor(act of putting, placing; setting up, etc.; act of throwing, casting; act of letting go, discarding; leap, twist; throw (in wrestling); twist, coil; twist, detour, circuit in road, etc.; tune, melody; contract; surety, guarantor; act of overthrowing, defeating; defeat, reverse; state, condition, plight; act of tiring; tiredness, fatigue), verbal noun of fo·ceird(sets, puts, places; throws, casts; casts down, overthrows; puts forth, emits, sends out; launches; utters, makes; raises (a shout, cry); performs, executes, wages).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural cora or coranna)

  1. twist, turn, turning movement
  2. (fishing) cast; haul from cast
  3. (music) lively turn; lively air
  4. (dance) reel

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural coir)

  1. agreement, contract; guarantee, pledge

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (genitive singular coir)

  1. verbal noun of coir
  2. tiredness, exhaustion

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

cor (present analytic corann, future analytic corfaidh, verbal noun coradh, past participle cortha)

  1. turn

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cor chor gcor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "cor" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 cor” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Istriot[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cor.

Noun[edit]

cor m

  1. heart

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m

  1. apocopic form of cuore

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-. Cognate with Ancient Greek καρδίᾱ(kardíā), Proto-Germanic *hertô, Sanskrit हृदय(hṛdaya), Hittite 𒆠𒅕(kir).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor n (genitive cordis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) heart
  2. (figuratively) soul, mind

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cor corda
genitive cordis cordium
cordum
dative cordī cordibus
accusative cor corda
ablative corde cordibus
vocative cor corda

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • COR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I am gradually convinced that..: addūcor, ut credam
    • to plunge a dagger, knife in some one's heart: sicam, cultrum in corde alicuius defigere (Liv. 1. 58)

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

cor

  1. rafsi of cortu.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cornu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. horn (instrument used to produce sound)

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (genitive cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of fo·ceird

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cor chor cor
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cor.

Noun[edit]

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. heart (organ which pumps blood)
  2. heart (metaphorically, human emotion)
    • circa 1145, Bernard de Ventadour, Tant ai mo cor ple de joya:
      Tant ai mo cor ple de joya
      My heart is so full of joy

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese coor, from Latin color, colōrem, from Old Latin colos(covering), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel-(to cover, conceal).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor f (plural cores)

  1. colour (Commonwealth English), color (American English)
Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:cor.

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin cor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cores)

  1. heart
Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:cor.

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Colors in Portuguese · cores (layout · text)
     vermelho      verde      amarelo      creme      branco
     carmim      magenta      azul-petróleo      lima      rosa,
cor-de-rosa
     índigo,
anil
     azul      laranja,
cor-de-laranja
     cinza      violeta
     preto      roxo      castanho,
marrom
     azul céu      ciano

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from Greek χορός(chorós, dance), or borrowed from Latin chorus, Italian coro, German Chor.

Noun[edit]

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. choir, chorus (group of singers)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin chorus.

Noun[edit]

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. a gathering, circle, society
  2. a bunch of hay arranged in squares or circles for making haybales
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cor.

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cors)

  1. (anatomy) heart

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cor(act of putting, placing; setting up, etc.; act of throwing, casting; act of letting go, discarding; leap, twist; throw (in wrestling); twist, coil; twist, detour, circuit in road, etc.; tune, melody; contract; surety, guarantor; act of overthrowing, defeating; defeat, reverse; state, condition, plight; act of tiring; tiredness, fatigue), verbal noun of fo·ceird(sets, puts, places; throws, casts; casts down, overthrows; puts forth, emits, sends out; launches; utters, makes; raises (a shout, cry); performs, executes, wages).

Noun[edit]

cor m (genitive singular coir or cuir)

  1. condition, state
  2. condition, eventuality, circumstance
    air chor sam bith‎ ― on any condition, on any account
    air chor 's gu‎ ― on condition that (cf also derived terms)
  3. method, manner
  4. custom
  5. surety
  6. term or condition of a treaty
  7. progress

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • 1 cor” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural cori)

  1. heart

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *korros(stunted, dwarfish) (compare Old Cornish cor, Middle Breton corr).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cor m (plural corrod)

  1. dwarf, pygmy, little urchin
  2. spider; shrew

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cor gor nghor chor
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]