côr

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See also: cor, Cor, cór, ćor, còr, cor-, and Cor.

Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cor

Noun[edit]

côr m (plural côrs)

  1. heart

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós, dance, chorus, choir).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

côr m (plural côrs)

  1. choir

Synonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

côr m, f (plural corau)

    1. choir in a church, host of angels, company of bards; assembly, council; tribe, host; religious community; choir, choral society
    2. (Christianity) a society that was both a convent and a seminary, conventual college
    3. faculty, profession
  1. crib, stall
    1. pew (in a church or chapel), stall, box (in a theatre, etc.)
    2. reading-pew, lectern
  2. song
  3. chancel, choir, sanctuary; court; circle, compass, range
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowing from English quire.

Noun[edit]

côr m

  1. quire (of paper)

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
côr gôr nghôr chôr
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • côr”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 2014