cas

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cas (comparative more cas, superlative most cas)

  1. Informal abbreviation for casual

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cāsus (case).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m (plural casos)

  1. case (event, situation, or fact)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Drehu[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

cas

  1. one

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French cas, borrowed from Latin cāsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kɑ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes:

Noun[edit]

cas m (plural cas)

  1. case, situation
  2. (medicine) case
  3. (law) case
    cas cliniqueclinical case
  4. (grammar) case

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese cas (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), proclitic form of casa (house) in some adverbial phrases.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ˈkas/

Noun[edit]

cas f (plural cas)

  1. house; chez
    • 19th century, folk-song:
      Trigo limpo non o hai; se queres algún centeo, vai por el a cas meu pai
      There's no clean wheat; if you want some rye, go fetch it chez my father
    Na cas do ferreiro, coitelo de pau (proverb)At the smith's house, knife of wood

Usage notes[edit]

When preceding the preposition de this proclitic form, rather than casa, is frequently used.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • cas” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • cas d” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • cas” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • cas” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cas” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡ʃas]
  • Hyphenation: cas

Etymology 1[edit]

Unknown. Compare Malay cas.

Noun[edit]

cas (plural, first-person possessive casku, second-person possessive casmu, third-person possessive casnya)

  1. A type of hand game

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English charge.

Verb[edit]

cas

  1. (colloquial) to charge, to add energy to (a battery, or a device containing a battery).

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cass (curly, curly-haired), from Proto-Celtic *kassos (curly, twisted, woven).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cas (genitive singular masculine cais, genitive singular feminine caise, plural casa, comparative caise)

  1. twisted, winding; curly
  2. complicated, intricate
  3. twisty, devious

Declension[edit]

Verb[edit]

cas (present analytic casann, future analytic casfaidh, verbal noun casadh, past participle casta) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. twist
  2. turn
  3. wind
  4. (with ar, thar) twist, wind, wrap (something) around (something else)
  5. (voice, music, idiomatic) sing, play (a song, tune)
    Tá sé ag casadh amhráin.He’s singing a song.
  6. return
  7. (with le)
    1. reproach with
    2. attempt
  8. (with ar, do, le) meet with
    Casadh an fear orm.I met the man.
    Cathain a casfar ort í?When will you meet her?
  9. (with chuig, ag) happen to have

Conjugation[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m (genitive singular casta, nominative plural castaí)

  1. Alternative form of casadh

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cas chas gcas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "cas" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “cas” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “cas” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

References[edit]

  • Matasović, Ranko (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *časъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m

  1. time (inevitable passing of events)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • cas in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • cas in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French cas.

Noun[edit]

cas (plural cass)

  1. case (event, happening)

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

cas

  1. (colloquial) Contraction of com as.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cos, from Proto-Celtic *koxsā, from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-eh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas f (genitive singular coise, plural casan)

  1. leg
  2. foot
  3. handle

Usage notes[edit]

  • The dative form is cois:
    Tha e ochd mìle air cois.It is eight miles on foot.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cas (comparative caise)

  1. steep

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cas chas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Named by indigenous peoples in Costa Rica (Chibchan).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m (plural cases)

  1. The fruit of a very tart species of guava
    Synonyms: guayaba de cas, guayaba de Costa Rica, guayaba agria
  2. The tree that bears those fruits, Psidium friedrichsthalianum.

References[edit]

  • Robertiello, Jack: Guava/Xalxocotl/Aracu/Guayaba, cited in Américas, Volumes 42-44 (1990), p. 58

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cas (feminine singular cas, plural cas, equative cased, comparative casach, superlative casaf)

  1. hateful, nasty
    Mae’n gas gyda fi gwrw.I hate beer (literally, “Beer is hateful with me.”)
  2. unpleasant, difficult
  3. averse to
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m (plural casau or casoedd)

  1. hatred, hatefulness

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

cas m (plural casiau)

  1. case, container
    Synonym: cynhwysydd

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviated form of castell (castle).

Noun[edit]

cas m (uncountable)

  1. Used in place names.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Inflected form of cael (to have; to receive, to get).

Verb[edit]

cas

  1. third-person singular preterite of cael
Alternative forms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cas gas nghas chas
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.