cos

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Translingual

[edit]

Symbol

[edit]

cos

  1. (trigonometry) cosine.
  2. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Corsican.

English

[edit]

Etymology 1

[edit]

From Cos, name of the Greek island from where it was introduced.

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos (plural coses)

  1. Romaine lettuce: a variety of lettuce with long, crisp leaves.
Translations
[edit]

Etymology 2

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]

Conjunction

[edit]

cos

  1. (UK, Ireland, South Africa, African-American Vernacular) Informal spelling of 'cause (because).
    • 2021, Isabel Waidner, Sterling Karat Gold, Peninsula Press, page 161:
      Taking the shortcut through the alleyway by the Jobcentre Plus, just cos I can, we arrive at my flat within minutes.
Translations
[edit]

Etymology 3

[edit]

Clipping of cousin.

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos (plural cosses)

  1. (informal, African-American Vernacular) A cousin, cuz.

Etymology 4

[edit]

From co +‎ -s.

Noun

[edit]

cos

  1. plural of co

Pronoun

[edit]

cos

  1. (nonstandard) Belonging to co. Gender-neutral possessive adjective, grammatically equivalent to the gendered his and her and the singular their.
    • 1973, Michael Glenn, Richard Kunnes, Repression or Revolution?: Therapy in the United States Today, Harper Colophon Books, →ISBN, page 53:
      Psychiatrists are trained to try to impose the responsibility for a patient’s problem on the patient coself, rather than on cos environment.
    • 1975, Valida Davila, “A Child’s Sexual Bill of Rights”, in Bernhardt J. Hurwood, editor, The Whole Sex Catalogue, New York, N.Y.: Pinnacle Books, published 1976, →ISBN, page 287:
      WHEREAS a child’s sexuality is just as much a part of cos whole person from birth as the blood that flows in cos veins, making cos sexual rights inherent and inalienable []
    • 1986, Ingrid Komar, Living the Dream: Twin Oaks Community 1979-1982, Louisa, Va.: Twin Oaks Community, →OCLC, page 355:
      Co absents coself from the Community for more than three weeks beyond the point of having made satisfactory arrangements with the Community with regard to cos absence.
Alternative forms
[edit]

Further reading

[edit]

Anagrams

[edit]

Aromanian

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *cōsō, from Latin consuō. Compare Romanian coase, cos.

Verb

[edit]

cos first-singular present indicative (third-person singular present indicative coasi or coase, past participle cusutã)

  1. to sew
[edit]

Catalan

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

Inherited from Old Catalan cors, from Latin corpus. Doublet of the borrowing corpus.

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos m (plural cossos)

  1. body (physical structure of a human or animal)
  2. body, corpse
    Synonym: cadàver

Derived terms

[edit]

References

[edit]
  • “cos” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Further reading

[edit]

Chinese

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]
This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Mandarin”

Noun

[edit]

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) cosplay
    cos  ―  wán cos de rén  ―  someone who cosplays; cosplayer
  2. (ACG, informal) cosplay costume

Verb

[edit]

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) to cosplay
  2. (slang, by extension) LARP; To pretend to be something, or act as something
    cos共產主義cos共产主义  ―  cos gòngchǎnzhǔyì  ―  LARP as a communist

Derived terms

[edit]

Czech

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]

Pronoun

[edit]

cos

  1. Alternative form of cosi

Declension

[edit]

Further reading

[edit]
  • cos in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • cos in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • cos in Internetová jazyková příručka

Friulian

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Slovene kòš, from Proto-Slavic *košь.

Noun

[edit]

cos m (plural cos)

  1. basket
    Synonyms: gei, geùt, ceste

Galician

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine plural definite article os (the).

Contraction

[edit]

cos m pl (masculine co, feminine coa, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

Irish

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Old Irish cos,[1] from Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-, whence also Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos f (genitive singular coise, nominative plural cosa)

  1. foot
  2. leg

Declension

[edit]

Derived terms

[edit]

Mutation

[edit]
Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cos chos gcos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

[edit]
  1. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “cos”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 20

Further reading

[edit]

Kashubian

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From co +‎ -s. Compare Polish coś and Slovincian cesz.

Pronunciation

[edit]
  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sɔs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔs
  • Syllabification: cos

Pronoun

[edit]

cos

  1. indeterminate pronoun; something

Further reading

[edit]
  • Stefan Ramułt (1893) “cos”, in Słownik języka pomorskiego czyli kaszubskiego (in Kashubian), page 18
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “coś”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[1]
  • cos/cosz”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Latin

[edit]

Etymology 1

[edit]

From Proto-Italic *kōtis, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeh₃- (to sharpen). Cognate with Latin catus (clever, cunning), cautēs (pointed rock), cuneus (wedge) and Ancient Greek κῶνος (kônos, cone).

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cōs f (genitive cōtis); third declension

  1. whetstone
Declension
[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōs cōtēs
Genitive cōtis cōtum
Dative cōtī cōtibus
Accusative cōtem cōtēs
Ablative cōte cōtibus
Vocative cōs cōtēs
Derived terms
[edit]
Descendants
[edit]
  • Catalan: cot
  • French: queux
  • Italian: cote, cotano
  • Romanian: cute
  • Sicilian: cuti
  • Spanish: codón

Etymology 2

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos

  1. Abbreviation of consul.

References

[edit]
  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cos”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Middle English

[edit]

Alternative forms

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Old English coss, from Proto-West Germanic *koss, from Proto-Germanic *kussaz. Forms with /i/, /u/ and /ɛ/ are influenced by Old English cyssan.

Pronunciation

[edit]
  • IPA(key): /kɔs/, /kus/, /kis/, /kɛs/

Noun

[edit]

cos (plural cosses or cossen)

  1. a kiss (action of kissing)
    Synonym: kissynge

Descendants

[edit]

References

[edit]

Old Cornish

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

Proto-Brythonic *kọs, from Latin cāseus.

Noun

[edit]

cos

  1. cheese

Descendants

[edit]

Old English

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos m

  1. Alternative form of coss

Old French

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos m

  1. inflection of cop:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

Old Irish

[edit]

Etymology

[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-. Cognate with Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos f (genitive coise, nominative plural cossa)

  1. foot
  2. leg

Inflection

[edit]
Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Vocative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Accusative coisN coisL cosaH, cossaH
Genitive coiseH cosL cosN
Dative coisL cosaib cosaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants

[edit]

Mutation

[edit]
Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cos chos cos
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

[edit]

Portuguese

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]
 

Contraction

[edit]

cos m pl (feminine plural cas)

  1. (colloquial) Contraction of com os (with the (masculine plural)).

Romanian

[edit]

Pronunciation

[edit]

Verb

[edit]

cos

  1. inflection of coase:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Spanish

[edit]

Noun

[edit]

cos m pl

  1. plural of co