coxa

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English[edit]

Diagram of an insect’s leg. The coxa is the second segment shown from the left.

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin coxa (hip). Doublet of cuish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coxa (plural coxae)

  1. (anatomy) The basal segment of a limb of various arthropods (insects and spiders, for example).

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From an older coyxa (14th century), from Old Galician and Old Portuguese, from Vulgar Latin or Late Latin coxa (thigh), from Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coxa f (plural coxas)

  1. (anatomy) thigh, the upper leg
    • 1409, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Tratado de Albeitaria. Santiago de Compostela: Centro Ramón Piñeiro, page 67:
      se vsaren cauallgar en el por toios ou por llugares asperos a esto semellauijs, ven o Cauallo vsado a saltar et andar porllos llugares sobreditos, alçara as coixas et os pees mais apostamente pollos outros llugares
      if they happen to ride in [the horse] through gorses or through rough places similar to that, and the horse is used to jump and walk by the aforementioned places, then he will raise the thighs and the feet more handsomely when in other places
    Synonym: coxote

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • coyxa” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • coyxa” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • coxa” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • coxa” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • coxa” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *koksā, from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-, whence also Old Irish cos (foot, leg) and Welsh coes (leg, shank).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

coxa f (genitive coxae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) hip (joint), hipbone
  2. (Medieval Latin, Vulgar Latin) thigh

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative coxa coxae
Genitive coxae coxārum
Dative coxae coxīs
Accusative coxam coxās
Ablative coxā coxīs
Vocative coxa coxae

Synonyms[edit]

  • (hip-joint of hipbone): ischion (Grecian)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • coxa”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • coxa”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • coxa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.ʃɐ/, [ˈko.ʃɐ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese coixa, coissa, from Vulgar Latin or Late Latin coxa (thigh), from Latin coxa (hip).

Noun[edit]

coxa f (plural coxas)

  1. thigh (part of the leg above the knee)
  2. drumstick (leg of a bird eaten as food)
  3. (arthropod anatomy) coxa (basal segment of some arthropods’ limbs)
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

coxa m or f (plural coxas)

  1. Clipping of coxa-branca.

Adjective[edit]

coxa (invariable)

  1. Clipping of coxa-branca.

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

coxa

  1. feminine singular of coxo