cors

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See also: CORS, còrs, and côrs

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

cors

  1. plural of cor

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin corsus.

Adjective[edit]

cors (feminine corsa, masculine plural corsos, feminine plural corses)

  1. Corsican

Noun[edit]

cors m (plural corsos, feminine corsa)

  1. Corsican (person)

cors m (uncountable)

  1. Corsican (language)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

cors

  1. plural of cor
  2. hearts (card suit)

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin corpus (body).

Noun[edit]

cors m (plural cors)

  1. Archaic spelling of corps.

Etymology 2[edit]

see cor

Noun[edit]

cors m

  1. plural of cor

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cursus.

Noun[edit]

cors m (plural cors)

  1. course

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cōrs f (genitive cōrtis); third declension

  1. Alternative form of cohors

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōrs cōrtēs
Genitive cōrtis cōrtum
Dative cōrtī cōrtibus
Accusative cōrtem cōrtēs
Ablative cōrte cōrtibus
Vocative cōrs cōrtēs

Descendants[edit]

  • Albanian: kurt
  • Aromanian: curti
  • Catalan: cort
  • Corsican: corti
  • Old French: cort
  • Friulian: cort
  • Galician: corte
  • Irish: cúirt
  • Italian: corte

References[edit]

  • cors in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cors in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cors in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cors in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corpus.

Noun[edit]

cors m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cors)

  1. body
    • circa 1250, Marie de France, Equitan
      m'est une anguisse el quer ferue, ki tut le cors me fet trembler
      Such a pain has pierced my heart, that makes my whole body quiver

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corpus.

Noun[edit]

cors m

  1. body

Descendants[edit]


Picard[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corpus.

Noun[edit]

cors m (plural cors)

  1. body

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Old Irish curchas (clump of reeds), Latin carex (reedgrass). Perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerbʰ- (to turn (around), wind), as reeds and bulrushes were formerly used to make ropes. For this sense, compare Latin scirpus.[1]

Noun[edit]

cors f (plural corsydd)

  1. bog
    Synonyms: mign, siglen
  2. reeds
    Synonym: cawn

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cors gors nghors chors
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cameron, J. (1883). Gaelic names of plants, Scottish and Irish, with notes. United Kingdom: (n.p.), p. 85

Further reading[edit]

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cors”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies