kurt

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See also: Kurt, Kürt, and kürt

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German kurt, from Latin curtus. The word was borrowed around the time when the High German consonant shift ceased to be active, which explains the Old High German doublets kurt and kurz. The fact that within Central Franconian the t-found is northern, may imply that it has been reinforced by Low Franconian and Low German influence.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kurt ‎(masculine kurte, feminine kurt, comparative kürter, superlative et kürzte or kürtste)

  1. (Ripuarian, north-western Moselle Franconian) short; not long
    Och, fröhter hätte mer us jeschaamp, met su nem kurte Kleedche op de Stroß ze john!
    Aw, in my day we would have been ashamed to go outside in such a short dress!

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

kurt m

  1. court (place arranged for playing the games of tennis, basketball, squash, badminton, volleyball and some other games)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kurt ‎(genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. deaf

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

kurt n

  1. chivalrous, courteous, well-mannered
  2. modesty
  3. (archaic) court

Derived terms[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kurt

  1. short

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *kur-, from Proto-Indo-European *kr̥-, *ker- ‎(to cut) (whence also cirst ‎(to cut, to strike), q.v.). Given that in ancient times fire was produced by striking (e.g., a flint against metal), it is possible that kurt uguni originally meant “to cut, strike fire.” It is also possible that the meaning of kurt was influenced by that of a homophonous Proto-Indo-European stem *ker ‎(to burn, to heat) (whence karst, q.v., and also German Herd, English hearth), which may ultimately be related to *ker- ‎(to cut). Cognates include Lithuanian kùrti ‎(to make fire; to make, to build, to found; to create; to run), Old Prussian kūra ‎(he built), Sanskrit करोति ‎(karṓti) (past tense कुरु ‎(kuru)), कृनोति ‎(kr̥nṓti, to make, to prepare).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

(file)

Verb[edit]

kurt tr., 1st conj., pres. kuru, kur, kur, past kūru

  1. to light, to ignite (to make something start burning or producing heat)
    kurt uguni, ugunskuru — to light a fire
    kurt krāsni, plīti — to light the oven, the stove
  2. to heat (to burn fuel in a stove in order to create heat in a certain room, building, etc.)
    kurt pirti — to heat the bath, sauna
  3. (figuratively) to encourage, to incite
    kurt naidu — to light, incite hatred

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Level intonation is the standard intonation for the term kurt ‎(to light, ignite) according to Latviešu etimoloģijas vārdnīca, pronunciation with a broken intonation is very common, however.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “kurt”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic kurt, from Proto-Turkic *Kūrt. Compare Azeri qurd.

Noun[edit]

kurt ‎(definite accusative kurdu, plural kurtlar)

  1. wolf
  2. maggot

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]