kurt

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See also: Kurt, Kürt, and kürt

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

kurt m

  1. court (place arranged for playing the games of tennis, basketball, squash, badminton, volleyball and some other games)

Synonyms[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kurt (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. deaf

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

kurt n

  1. chivalrous, courteous, well-mannered
  2. modesty
  3. (archaic) court

Derived terms[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

kurt

  1. short

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Baltic *kur-, from Proto-Indo-European *kr̥-, *ker- (to cut) (whence also cirst (to cut, to strike), q.v.). Given that in ancient times fire was produced by striking (e.g., a flint against metal), it is possible that kurt uguni originally meant “to cut, strike fire.” It is also possible that the meaning of kurt was influenced by that of a homophonous Proto-Indo-European stem *ker (to burn, to heat) (whence karst, q.v., and also German Herd, English hearth), which may ultimately be related to *ker- (to cut). Cognates include Lithuanian kùrti (to make fire; to make, to build, to found; to create; to run), Old Prussian kūra (he built), Sanskrit करोति (karṓti) (past tense कुरु (kuru)), कृनोति (kr̥nṓti, to make, to prepare).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

kurt tr., 1st conj., pres. kuru, kur, kur, past kūru

  1. to light, to ignite (to make something start burning or producing heat)
    kurt uguni, ugunskuru — to light a fire
    kurt krāsni, plīti — to light the oven, the stove
  2. to heat (to burn fuel in a stove in order to create heat in a certain room, building, etc.)
    kurt pirti — to heat the bath, sauna
  3. (figuratively) to encourage, to incite
    kurt naidu — to light, incite hatred

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Level intonation is the standard intonation for the term kurt (to light, ignite) according to Latviešu etimoloģijas vārdnīca, pronunciation with a broken intonation is very common, however.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “kurt” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca, in 2 vols, Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN: 9984-700-12-7

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic kurt, from Proto-Turkic *Kūrt. Compare to Azeri qurd.

Noun[edit]

kurt (definite accusative kurdu, plural kurtlar)

  1. wolf
  2. maggot

Related terms[edit]

Declension[edit]