co

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English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

co ‎(plural cos)

  1. (slang) company
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

co ‎(third-person singular, gender-neutral, reflexive coself)

  1. (neologism, nonstandard) they (singular). Gender-neutral subject pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 1983, Ingrid Komar, Living the Dream:
      Co consistently does less than cos share of the Community work. 4. Co absents coself from the Community for more than three weeks [...]
    • 1996, Brett Beemyn, Mickey Elianon, Queer studies: a lesbian, gay, bisexual, & transgender anthology, page 74:
      At the very least, an individual might have to use different terms to describe coself in a heterosexual context than co uses in a sexual minority context [...]
    • 2004 April 1, "Pieira dos Lobos" (username), "Fern's Story two", alt.magick.serious, Usenet:
      A youngster of my own introduction had been rejected by an object of preadolescent craving and had killed coself by leaping at the ceiling of co's quarters. Co was a rising Large Game star, her spring was powerful, our gravity flux was low - co's head struck the surface with enough force to kill on impact.
  2. (neologism, nonstandard) them (singular). Gender-neutral object pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns him and her.
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

co

  1. what
    Co se děje?
    What's up?
    Co se stalo?
    What happened?

Conjunction[edit]

co

  1. that
    Od té doby, co jsme spolu...
    Since we’ve been together... (lit.) Since the time that we’ve been together...
  2. what
    Ví, co chce.
    He knows what he wants.

Particle[edit]

co

  1. (indeclinable) isn't it so, don't you think?
    To je pěkné, co?
    That’s nice, isn’t it?

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quod.

Pronoun[edit]

co

  1. what

Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

co ‎(accusative singular co-on, plural co-oj, accusative plural co-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C/c.

See also[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From contraction of preposition con(with) + masculine definite article o(the)

Contraction[edit]

co m ‎(feminine coa, masculine plural cos, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French coc.

Noun[edit]

co m

  1. rooster, cockerel, cock

Ido[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

co ‎(plural ci)

  1. Alternative form of ico

Lojban[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

co ‎(rafsi col)

  1. tanru inverter: written between the components of a compound words, it swaps the logical order
    zdani cukta
    book with the house-property
    zdani co cukta
    house with the book-property
    ti du lo bitmu poi selzbasu fi lo kitybli
    This is a wall which is made of bricks.
    ti bitmu co selzbasu fi lo kitybli
    This is a wall which is made of bricks.

Usage notes[edit]

  • A tanru of the form "A co B" might not always be a mere substitute of "B (ke) A", because whereas a tanru of the form "B (ke) A" inherits its place structure from A, a tanru of the form "A co B" inherits its place structure from B.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

Pronoun[edit]

co

  1. what (interrogative)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected form of kśěś.

Verb[edit]

co

  1. third-person singular present of kśěś

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French colp, coup, from Vulgar Latin *colpus, from Classical Latin colaphus(blow with the fist; cuff), from Ancient Greek κόλαφος(kólaphos, blow, slap).

Noun[edit]

co m ‎(plural cos)

  1. (Jersey) blow
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French coq, coc.

Noun[edit]

co m ‎(plural cos)

  1. (Jersey) cockerel
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French col, from Latin collum(neck).

Noun[edit]

co m ‎(plural cos)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey, Normandy, anatomy) neck
Alternative forms[edit]
  • ko (Sark)

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Adverb[edit]

co

  1. (interrogative) how?
    Co·bbia mo ḟechtas?‎ ― How will my expedition be?

Usage notes[edit]

Is followed by the dependent form of the verb, which is neither nasalized nor lenited.

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: go
  • Scottish Gaelic: gu
  • Manx: dy

Preposition[edit]

co

  1. to, toward

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *čьto, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, *kʷis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

co

  1. what

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • co in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) ca
  • (Surmiran) tgi
  • (Puter) cu

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Conjunction[edit]

co

  1. (Vallader) than

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

co m ‎(plural cos)

  1. (Aragon, colloquial) dude, friend

Related terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

co

  1. Misspelling of .

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cum. Compare Italian con

Preposition[edit]

co

  1. with, together

See also[edit]