lo

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Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

lo

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Lao.

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English lo, loo, from Old English (“exclamation of surprise, grief, or joy”). Conflated in Middle English with lo! (interjection), a corruption of lok!, loke! (“look!”) (as in lo we! (look we!)). Cognate with Scots lo, lu (“lo”). See also look.

Interjection[edit]

lo

  1. (archaic) look, see, behold (in an imperative sense).
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of low.

Adjective[edit]

lo (not comparable)

  1. Informal spelling of low.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Contraction[edit]

lo

  1. (colloquial) hello ('lo; see hallo)

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. him (direct object)

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin

Article[edit]

lo n sg (masculine el, feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. it (third-person singular neuter direct pronoun)

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo inan

  1. sleep

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin

Pronoun[edit]

lo (enclitic, contracted 'l, proclitic el, contracted proclitic l')

  1. him (direct object)
Declension[edit]
Usage notes[edit]
  • -lo is the full (plena) form of the pronoun. It is normally used after verbs ending with consonant or ⟨u⟩.
    Has d'ajudar-lo.You have to help him.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin illum, from ille.

Article[edit]

lo m (feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural les)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) the (definite article)
    Synonym: (standard) el

Further reading[edit]


Chickasaw[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. I

Chinese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]


Noun[edit]

lo

  1. (neologism, mostly in compounds) Lolita fashion
    lo  ―  lo niáng  ―  a girl who regularly dresses in lolita fashion

Derived terms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *lluɨɣ, from Proto-Celtic *lēgā. Cognate with Welsh llwy, Breton loa (Vannes dialect loé, lui).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo f (plural loyow)

  1. spoon

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo (accusative singular lo-on, plural lo-oj, accusative plural lo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter L.

See also[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See o. Compare Portuguese lo.

Article[edit]

lo m sg (feminine singular la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. Alternative form of o (the, masculine singular)
    Para seres forte debes come-lo caldo.
    You must eat the broth for growing strong.
Usage notes[edit]

The l- forms of article are compulsorily used after the preposition por and adverb u. It is optional when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, after unstressed pronouns nos, vos and lles (when they are enclitc) of ambos, entrambos, todos, tras and copulative conjunction (e mais and tonic pronouns vós and nós followed by a numerical precision).

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo m (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of o (him)
Usage notes[edit]

The l- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -r or -s, and is suffixed to the preceding word.

Related terms[edit]

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from co (this), to (“that”), based on la (“the”), ol (“it”).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. referring to a previous sentence or phrase, i.e. a fact rather than an object; it, the
    Il esas mortinta de tri monati, e vu ne savas lo!
    He's been dead for three months, and you didn't know it (that he's been dead for three months)!

References[edit]

  1. ^ Progreso, VI, 238

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Betawi Kota lo (you), from Hokkien (). Doublet of lu.

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. (chiefly Jakarta, slang) Second-person singular pronoun: you, your, yours
    Oke, kalau lo baper, yuk cabut.[1]OK, if you are sensitive, let's go!
Synonyms[edit]

Indonesian informal second-person pronouns:

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2018, Yuni Astuti, Saipeh Baper, CV Jejak (Jejak Publisher) (→ISBN), page 53:

Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

lo

  1. Alternative spelling of loh.

Particle[edit]

lo

  1. Alternative spelling of loh.

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. it, that (direct object)
    Tu lo audi? – Do you hear it?

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): °/lo/°, /lo/°[1]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Hyphenation: lo

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin

Article[edit]

Italian Definite Articles
singular plural
masculine il
lo/l'
i
gli
feminine  la/l' le

lo m sg (plural gli)

  1. The form of il that is used before the so-called impure consonants, that is, s+consonant (impure s), gn, pn, ps, x or z; before a vowel it becomes l'; the
    l’ossothe bone
    lo statothe state
    lo ziothe uncle

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin illum, the accusative singular of ille.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo m sg (plural li, female la)

  1. (accusative) him
    Lo conosci?Do you know him?
  2. (accusative) it, this or that thing
    Synonym: ciò
    Quando te lo diedi.When I gave it to you.
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ lo in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)
  2. ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, →ISBN, page 123

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

lo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ろ゚
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ロ゚

Laboya[edit]

Verb[edit]

lo

  1. to go
    Synonyms: kako, attu

References[edit]

  • Rina, A. Dj.; Kabba, John Lado B. (2011), “lo”, in Kamus Bahasa Lamboya, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat [Dictionary of Lamboya Language, West Sumba Regency], Waikabubak: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat, page 60

Lashi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Lolo-Burmese [Term?], from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *laj. Cognates include Chinese (lái) and Burmese လာ (la).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lo

  1. (intransitive) to come

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis), page 16

Lolopo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Loloish *ʔ-l(y)a¹ (Bradley), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan . Cognate with Sichuan Yi (hxa nie), Burmese လျှာ (hlya), S'gaw Karen ပျ့ၤ (plaȳ), Tedim Chin lei², Drung pvlai, Chepang ले (le).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo 

  1. (Yao'an) tongue

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

lo

  1. Alternative form of elo

Malagasy[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lo

  1. rotten, spoiled

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

lo (lo5 / lo0, Zhuyin ˙ㄌㄛ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of .

Usage notes[edit]

  • Almost all syllables transliterated from Chinese speech contain one of four diacritics indicating tone. This is one of the few syllables in the Chinese language that is transcribed only in a toneless form.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *lō

Noun[edit]

 f or n

  1. clearing in a forest

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: lo (obsolete outside toponyms)

Further reading[edit]

  • loo”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “loo”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page loo

Neapolitan[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. Alternative form of 'o

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo n (definite singular loet, uncountable)

  1. lint

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lo

  1. past of le

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Confer with Icelandic . May have something to do with Old Norse lagðr.

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. woollen hairs that shed off knitted or woven fabrics
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse , lóa.

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. any of various birds of the family Charadriidae, the plovers and dotterels
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lóð f or n.

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. (agriculture) a harvested (especially grain), that has been cut but not threshed
  2. (agriculture, collective) grain, husk and straw
  3. (agriculture) a grain harvest
  4. (agriculture, collective) hay

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse  f or n (a clearing in the forest).

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. Used in placenames: meadow
    Synonyms: grasslette, eng
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From Dutch and/or Middle Low German .

Noun[edit]

lo m (definite singular loen, indefinite plural loar, definite plural loane)

  1. (nautical) part of a vessel whose side faces the wind
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lo (singular and plural lo)

  1. located or situated on the windy side

See also[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

From Middle Low German lot (genitive lodes). Doublet of lodd.

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. a shotgun shell
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 7[edit]

Akin to Icelandic löð.

Noun[edit]

lo f (definite singular loa, indefinite plural loer, definite plural loene)

  1. a tool used to form the head of nails
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 8[edit]

Of unknown origin.

Noun[edit]

lo n (definite singular loet, indefinite plural lo, definite plural loa)

  1. natural fertilizer
  2. dung

Etymology 9[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

lo

  1. past tense of le

Etymology 10[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

lo

  1. imperative of loa and loe

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lou (Mistralian)
  • le (Toulouse, Massat)
  • eth (Gascon)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan lo, from Vulgar Latin

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

lo (feminine la, masculine plural los, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

Usage notes[edit]

  • In the Provençal dialect, the masculine and feminine plural is lei.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illum; compare Old Occitan lo.

Article[edit]

lo

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of le; masculine singular oblique definite article

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. (9th and 10th centuries) Alternative form of le; masculine singular object pronoun

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *lo, *illu, from Latin illum; compare Old French lo.

Article[edit]

lo (feminine la)

  1. the; masculine singular definite article

Descendants[edit]

  • Occitan: lo

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese logo ("soon") and Spanish luego ("soon, later").

Verb[edit]

lo

Indicates the future tense of a verb.

  1. shall
  2. will

Phalura[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

lo (demonstrative, Perso-Arabic spelling لوۡ)

  1. that (agr: dist nom masc sg)

References[edit]

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[3], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo (demonstrative, Perso-Arabic spelling لوۡ)

  1. it
  2. he (dist masc nom)

References[edit]

  • Liljegren, Henrik; Haider, Naseem (2011) Palula Vocabulary (FLI Language and Culture Series; 7)‎[4], Islamabad, Pakistan: Forum for Language Initiatives, →ISBN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See o.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lu/, [lu]
  • Hyphenation: lo
  • Rhymes: -u

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. Alternative form of o (third-person masculine singular objective pronoun) used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m); the consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary
    Contá-lo (contar)To tell it.
    Contámo-lo (contamos)We told it.
    Fi-lo (fiz)I did it.
    Ten-lo (tens)You have it.

Coordinate terms[edit]

  • no (following a nasal vowel), o (following an oral vowel)

See also[edit]

See Template:Portuguese personal pronouns for further pronouns.


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) lad

Etymology[edit]

From Latin lātus.

Adjective[edit]

lo m (feminine singular loa, masculine plural los, feminine plural loas)

  1. (Sutsilvan) wide, broad

Synonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) lartg
  • (Puter, Vallader) larg

Silesian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

lo

  1. by, at, on
  2. to
  3. for

Southern Ndebele[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a Vulgar Latin

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

lo

  1. neuter definite article used to make abstract nouns from adjectives; the
    lo pobrethe poorness / what is poor / the poor thing

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. accusative of él, ello, and usted (when referring to a man); him, it, you (formal)
    lo veoI see it
  2. impersonal neuter pronoun (clitic form of ello); it, that
    lo esThat’s it

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Swahili[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

lo

  1. oh!

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish , from Old Norse lóa, derived from or related to Proto-Germanic *luhsaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo c

  1. a lynx
    Synonym: lodjur

Declension[edit]

Declension of lo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lo lon loar loarna
Genitive los lons loars loarnas

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English law.

Noun[edit]

lo

  1. law

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (be concerned; worry about, SV: lự).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lo (𢗼, 𢥈)

  1. to bother; to worry
  2. to attend to; to care for

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo m

  1. Soft mutation of llo.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llo lo unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Noun[edit]

lo m

  1. Soft mutation of glo.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
glo lo nglo unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West Makian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

lo

  1. and
    Muhammad lo HasanMuhammad and Hasan
    namu de esi lo ifachicken eggs and kenari nuts

References[edit]

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[5], Pacific linguistics

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse  f. Cognate with Norwegian lo f, luv m, Old English wlōh f. Related to Old Norse lagðr m (tuft of wool or hair).

Noun[edit]

lo n

  1. fluff
  2. dust (of tissues)
  3. fringe of cloth and other textiles

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German lōt, from Proto-West Germanic *laud.

Noun[edit]

lo n

  1. plummet

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lófi, láfi (“threshing barn”). Cognate with Norwegian låve, Swedish loge.

Noun[edit]

lo m

  1. threshing barn
Derived terms[edit]

Wutunhua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Tibetan ལོ (lo).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo

  1. year
    Synonym: nian

References[edit]

  • Erika Sandman (2016) A Grammar of Wutun[6], University of Helsinki (PhD), →ISBN

Xhosa[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

-lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

Yoruba[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. (transitive) to use; to engage; to exploit
Usage notes[edit]
  • lo before a direct object
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. to become parboiled (specifically relating to yam tubers in the process of making yam flour, èlùbọ́)
    Synonym: bọ̀
    èlùbọ́ ti The yam tuber used to prepare èlùbọ́ has become parboiled
Usage notes[edit]
  • lo before a direct object
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. to become bendable or flexible
    Synonym: rọ̀
Usage notes[edit]
  • lo before a direct object
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. to lose interest in something; to become disheartened
    Synonyms: , gọ́
Derived terms[edit]

Zaniza Zapotec[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo

  1. eye

Zhuang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Particle[edit]

lo (old orthography lo)

  1. Used at the end of a sentence to indicate a change of state or a new situation.
    • 2016, Gij Baujcingq Moq Caeuq Geij Bonj Gij Baujcingq Daeuzdaeuz [The New Testament with A Few Books of the Old Testament], Hong Kong: New Bridge Publishing Company Limited, →ISBN, Lizsij dih Gaihcij [Genesis] 1:3:
      Gajlaeng Cangqdiq naeuz: “Rongh!” Yiengq couh doq miz rongh lo.
      And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
  2. Used at the end of a sentence to express affirmation or conclusiveness.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lo (Sawndip form ⿰女卢, old orthography lo)

  1. (dialectal) daughter-in-law

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

lo (Sawndip form ⿰口卢, old orthography lo)

  1. (dialectal) to worry; to be anxious

Zou[edit]

Lo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. basket

References[edit]

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 40

Zulu[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. this; class 1 proximal demonstrative.
Inflection[edit]
Stem -ló
Full form
Locative kulo
Full form
Locative kulo
Copulative yilo
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 walo owalo
Class 2 balo abalo
Class 3 walo owalo
Class 4 yalo eyalo
Class 5 lalo elalo
Class 6 alo awalo
Class 7 salo esalo
Class 8 zalo ezalo
Class 9 yalo eyalo
Class 10 zalo ezalo
Class 11 lwalo olwalo
Class 14 balo obalo
Class 15 kwalo okwalo
Class 17 kwalo okwalo

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. this; class 3 proximal demonstrative.
Inflection[edit]
Stem -ló
Full form
Locative kulo
Full form
Locative kulo
Copulative yilo
Possessive forms
Modifier Substantive
Class 1 walo owalo
Class 2 balo abalo
Class 3 walo owalo
Class 4 yalo eyalo
Class 5 lalo elalo
Class 6 alo awalo
Class 7 salo esalo
Class 8 zalo ezalo
Class 9 yalo eyalo
Class 10 zalo ezalo
Class 11 lwalo olwalo
Class 14 balo obalo
Class 15 kwalo okwalo
Class 17 kwalo okwalo

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

lo

  1. Combining stem of lona.

References[edit]