lounge

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See also: Lounge

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain. Perhaps from French s'allonger (to lie down). Compare French longer (to walk along). Compare also German lungern (to hang or lounge around, linger).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /laʊnd͡ʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd͡ʒ

Verb[edit]

lounge (third-person singular simple present lounges, present participle lounging, simple past and past participle lounged)

  1. To relax; to spend time lazily; to stand, sit, or recline, in an indolent manner.
    We like to spend our Sundays lounging about at home in our pyjamas.
    • 1854, J. Hannay, Singleton Fontenoy, R.N
      We lounge over the sciences, dawdle through literature, yawn over politics.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

lounge (plural lounges)

  1. (now rare) A place where one can lounge; an area, establishment, house etc. where loungers gather and where one can relax and be at ease.
    • 1791, Charlotte Smith, Celestina, Broadview 2004, p. 196:
      He [] prevailed on Captain Musgrave to introduce him to a family, where he supposed he might find a monstrous good lounge for the rest of the time he was to be quartered in the neighbourhood.
    • 1817 December, [Jane Austen], Northanger Abbey; published in Northanger Abbey: And Persuasion. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: John Murray, [], 1818, →OCLC:
      Every search for him was equally unsuccessful, in morning lounges or evening assemblies.
    • 1834, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], Francesca Carrara. [], volume II, London: Richard Bentley, [], (successor to Henry Colburn), →OCLC, page 16:
      One morning she accompanied Madame de Soissons to the fair, then the favourite lounge and amusement. The Comtesse bought every trifle that caught her eye, while Francesca looked on.
  2. The act of someone who lounges; idle reclining.
    • 1849, The Knickerbocker, volume 33, page 198:
      That is, he devoted his waking hours to lounges among the habitués of Chestnut-street, and lollings in an arm-chair of 'Squire Coke in Walnut-street.
  3. (Britain) The living room or sitting room of a house.
    • 1954, Alexander Alderson, The Subtle Minotaur,[1] chapter 18:
      The lounge was furnished in old English oak and big Knole settees. There were rugs from Tabriz and Kerman on the highly polished floor. [] A table lamp was fashioned from a silver Egyptian hookah.
  4. A large comfortable seat for two or three people or more, a sofa or couch; also called lounge chair.
  5. A waiting room in an office, airport etc.
  6. An establishment, similar to a bar, that serves alcohol and often plays background music or shows television.

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • German: Lounge
  • Japanese: ラウンジ (raunji)
  • Korean: 라운지 (raunji)
  • Swedish: lounge

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English lounge.

Noun[edit]

lounge m (definite singular loungen, indefinite plural lounger, definite plural loungene)

  1. a lounge (usually in a hotel, airport or ship)

References[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lounge m (plural lounges or lounge)

  1. lounge

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

lo +‎ unge

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lounge c

  1. A lynx cub.
Declension[edit]
Declension of lounge 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lounge loungen loungar loungarna
Genitive lounges loungens loungars loungarnas

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English lounge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lounge c

  1. A lounge, a waiting room.
Declension[edit]
Declension of lounge 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lounge loungen lounger loungerna
Genitive lounges loungens loungers loungernas