bar

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
U+3374, ㍴
SQUARE BAR

[U+3373]
CJK Compatibility
[U+3375]

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English barre, from Old French barre (beam, bar, gate, barrier), from Vulgar Latin *barra, of uncertain origin. Doublet of barre.

Noun[edit]

bar (countable and uncountable, plural bars)

Two steel bars
A toll bar in Romania
  1. A solid, more or less rigid object of metal or wood with a uniform cross-section smaller than its length.
    The window was protected by steel bars.
  2. (countable, uncountable, metallurgy) A solid metal object with uniform (round, square, hexagonal, octagonal or rectangular) cross-section; in the US its smallest dimension is 14 inch or greater, a piece of thinner material being called a strip.
    Ancient Sparta used iron bars instead of handy coins in more valuable alloy, to physically discourage the use of money.
    We are expecting a carload of bar tomorrow.
  3. A cuboid piece of any solid commodity.
    bar of chocolate
    bar of soap
  4. A broad shaft, band, or stripe.
    a bar of light
    a bar of colour
  5. A long, narrow drawn or printed rectangle, cuboid or cylinder, especially as used in a bar code or a bar chart.
  6. (typography) Any of various lines used as punctuation or diacritics, such as the pipe ⟨|⟩, fraction bar (as in 12), and strikethrough (as in Ⱥ), formerly (obsolete) including oblique marks such as the slash.
    Hyponyms: pipe, strikethrough, macron
  7. (mathematics) The sign indicating that the characteristic of a logarithm is negative, conventionally placed above the digit(s) to show that it applies to the characteristic only and not to the mantissa.
  8. (physics) A similar sign indicating that the charge on a particle is the negative of its usual value (and that consequently the particle is in fact an antiparticle).
  9. A business selling alcoholic drinks for consumption on the premises, or the premises themselves; a public house.
    Synonyms: barroom, ginshop, (British) pub, public house, tavern; see also Thesaurus:pub
    The street was lined with all-night bars.
  10. The counter of such premises.
    Synonym: wet bar
    Step up to the bar and order a drink.
  11. A counter, or simply a cabinet, from which alcoholic drinks are served in a private house or a hotel room.
  12. (by extension, in combinations such as coffee bar, juice bar, etc.) Premises or a counter serving any type of beverage.
  13. An establishment where alcohol and sometimes other refreshments are served.
  14. An informal establishment selling food to be consumed on the premises.
    a burger bar
    a local fish bar
  15. An establishment offering cosmetic services.
    a nail bar; a brow bar
  16. An official order or pronouncement that prohibits some activity.
    Synonyms: ban, prohibition
    The club has lifted its bar on women members.
  17. Anything that obstructs, hinders, or prevents; an obstruction; a barrier.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe: A Tragedy. [], London: [] T[homas] N[ewcomb] for Henry Herringman, [], published 1676, OCLC 228724395, Act V, page 83:
      Muſt I new bars to my own joy create?
    • 2013, Terence Dillon, A Long Way Home (page 184)
      Mr Harding could look back on his initial judgement of Paul's talent with great satisfaction while Paul could reflect that to be Irish was not necessarily a bar to progress.
  18. (programming, whimsical, derived from fubar) A metasyntactic variable representing an unspecified entity, often the second in a series, following foo.
    Suppose we have two objects, foo and bar.
  19. (UK, Parliament) A dividing line (physical or notional) in the chamber of a legislature beyond which only members and officials may pass.
  20. (UK, law) The railing surrounding the part of a courtroom in which the judges, lawyers, defendants and witnesses stay.
  21. (US, law, usually with the) The bar exam, the legal licensing exam.
    He's studying hard to pass the Bar this time; he's failed it twice before.
  22. (law, metonymically, "the Bar", "the bar") Collectively, lawyers or the legal profession; specifically applied to barristers in some countries, but including all lawyers in others.
    He was called to the bar, he became a barrister.
  23. (telecommunications, electronics) One of an array of bar-shaped symbols that display the level of something, such as wireless signal strength or battery life remaining.
    I don't have any bars in the middle of this desert.
  24. (music) A vertical line across a musical staff dividing written music into sections, typically of equal durational value.
  25. (music) One of those musical sections.
    Synonym: measure
  26. (sports) A horizontal pole that must be crossed in the high jump and pole vault.
  27. (figuratively) Any level of achievement regarded as a challenge to be overcome.
  28. (soccer, most codes) The crossbar.
    • 2010 December 29, Chris Whyatt, “Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton”, in BBC[1]:
      Composed play then saw Sam Ricketts nutmeg Ashley Cole before Taylor whipped a fine curling effort over Petr Cech's bar.
  29. (backgammon) The central divider between the inner and outer table of a backgammon board, where stones are placed if they are hit.
  30. An addition to a military medal, on account of a subsequent act.
  31. A linear shoaling landform feature within a body of water.
  32. (geography, nautical, hydrology) A ridge or succession of ridges of sand or other substance, especially a formation extending across the mouth of a river or harbor or off a beach, and which may obstruct navigation. (FM 55-501).
  33. (heraldry) One of the ordinaries in heraldry; a diminutive of a fess.
  34. A city gate, in some British place names.
    Temple Bar, London
  35. (mining) A drilling or tamping rod.
  36. (mining) A vein or dike crossing a lode.
  37. (architecture) A gatehouse of a castle or fortified town.
  38. (farriery) The part of the crust of a horse's hoof which is bent inwards towards the frog at the heel on each side, and extends into the centre of the sole.
  39. (farriery, in the plural) The space between the tusks and grinders in the upper jaw of a horse, in which the bit is placed.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Arabic: بَار‎ m (bār)
  • Armenian: բար (bar)
  • Bulgarian: бар (bar)
  • Burmese: ဘား (bha:)
  • Chichewa: bála
  • Chinese:
    Mandarin: ()
  • Czech: bar m
  • Danish: bar c
  • Dutch: bar m
  • Esperanto: baro
  • Estonian: baar
  • French: bar m
    • Romanian: bar
  • Galician: bar m
  • Georgian: ბარი (bari)
  • German: Bar f
  • Greek: μπαρ n (bar)
  • Gulf Arabic: بار(bār)
  • Hebrew: בָּר(bar), בָּאר(bár)
  • Hungarian: bár (also via German)
  • Icelandic: bar m
  • Irish: beár m
  • Italian: bar m
  • Japanese: バー ()
  • Khmer: បារ (baa)
  • Korean: (ba)
  • Lithuanian: bãras m
  • Macedonian: бар m (bar)
  • Malagasy: ba
  • Norwegian:
    Bokmål: bar m
    Nynorsk: bar m
  • Persian: بار(bâr)
  • Polish: bar m
  • Portuguese: bar m
  • Russian: бар m (bar)
  • Serbo-Croatian: ба̑р m, bȃr m
  • Slovene: bȃr m
  • Spanish: bar m
  • Swahili: baa
  • Swedish: bar c
  • Thai: บาร์ (baa)
  • Turkish: bar
  • Xhosa: íbhári
  • Zulu: ibha
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [2]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English barren, from Old French barrer,[1] from Medieval Latin barrare (to bar), from the noun. Cognate Occitan barrar, Spanish barrar, Portuguese barrar.

Preposition properly imperative of the verb. Compare barring.

Verb[edit]

bar (third-person singular simple present bars, present participle barring, simple past and past participle barred)

  1. (transitive) To obstruct the passage of (someone or something).
    Our way was barred by a huge rockfall.
    • 1906 August, Alfred Noyes, “The Highwayman”, in Poems, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., published October 1906, OCLC 28569419, part 1, stanza V, page 47:
      'One kiss, my bonny sweetheart, I'm after a prize to-night, / But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light; / Yet, if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day, / Then look for me by moonlight, / Watch for me by moonlight, / I'll come to thee by moonlight, though Hell should bar the way.'
  2. (transitive) To prohibit.
    I couldn't get into the nightclub because I had been barred.
  3. (transitive) To lock or bolt with a bar.
    bar the door
  4. To imprint or paint with bars, to stripe.
    • 1899 February, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, volume CLXV, number M, New York, N.Y.: The Leonard Scott Publishing Company, [], OCLC 1042815524, part I, page 208, column 1:
      I lived in a hut in the yard. To be out of the chaos I would sometimes get into the accountant’s office. It was built of horizontal planks, and so badly put together that, as he bent over his high desk, he was barred from neck to heels with narrow strips of sunlight.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

Preposition[edit]

bar

  1. Except, other than, besides.
    He invited everyone to his wedding bar his ex-wife.
    • 2019 October, Philip Sherratt, “Midland Main Line upgrade presses on”, in Modern Railways, page 62:
      These see the overhead wires installed on all bar the slow lines between Bedford and Wellingborough by next May, with the remaining section completed by August, when the full programme is due to be completed.
  2. (horse racing) Denotes the minimum odds offered on other horses not mentioned by name.
    Leg At Each Corner is at 3/1, Lost My Shirt 5/1, and it's 10/1 bar.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ barren, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2018, retrieved 31 October 2019.

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined circa 1900.

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

bar (plural bars)

  1. A non-SI unit of pressure equal to 100,000 pascals, approximately equal to atmospheric pressure at sea level.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Chinese: ()
  • Finnish: baari
  • Galician: bar m
  • Greek: μπαρ n (bar)
  • Hebrew: בָּר(bar)
  • Icelandic: bar n
  • Irish: bar m
  • Korean: (ba)
  • Spanish: bar m
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afar[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌɾ/
  • Hyphenation: bar

Noun[edit]

bár m (plural baritté f)

  1. night
  2. age

Declension[edit]

Declension of bár
absolutive bár
predicative bára
subjective bári
genitive bárti
Postpositioned forms
l-case báral
k-case bárak
t-case bárat
h-case bárah

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “bar”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch bar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bar (attributive barre, comparative barder, superlative barste)

  1. barren

References[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *bara, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to cure (with spells or herbs)), compare Ancient Greek φάρμακον (phármakon, drug, medicine), Lithuanian bùrti (to conjure), Latvian to conjure, practice magic, Latvian burts (letter, font).[1]

Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *bʰars- (spike, prickle), *bʰers- (top, tip, point), compare Welsh bara (bread), Old Norse barr (corn, grain, barley), Latin far (spelt), Serbo-Croatian brȁšno.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar m (indefinite plural barëra, definite singular bari, definite plural barërat)

  1. grass
  2. (figuratively) tasteless food
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar m (indefinite plural barna, definite singular bari, definite plural barnat)

  1. medicine, medication, medicinal plant
  2. (figuratively, colloquial) cure, palliative, solution
  3. (figuratively, colloquial) marijuana, likely a calque from English or French
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ D. Q. Adams, "Heal: *bher-", in Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture (London: Fitzroy-Dearborn, 1997), 262.
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “bar”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 17

Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Persian بار‎.

Noun[edit]

bar (definite accusative barı, plural barlar)

  1. fruit
    Synonym: meyvə
  2. crop, harvest, yield
    Synonym: məhsul
  3. (figuratively) fruit (an end result, effect, or consequence)
    Synonym: bəhrə
  4. (archaic) burden
    Synonym: yük

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar (definite accusative barı, plural barlar)

  1. bar (a business selling alcoholic drinks)

Etymology 3[edit]

Internationalism; ultimately from French bar, from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros).

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. (meteorology) bar (unit of pressure)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bar” in Obastan.com.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French barre

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bars)

  1. bar (establishment)
  2. bar (unit of measure)

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German wir, from Old High German wir, from Proto-West Germanic *wiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *wīz.

Pronoun[edit]

bar

  1. (Sette Comuni) we
    Synonym: bandare
    Bar zeinan bèllase.We are Italians.
    Bar zeinda.We are here.
    Bar habanze galummet.We took them.

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

  • “bar” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *bār.

Predicative[edit]

bar

  1. there is, there are, indicates existence or possession
    Antonym: yoq

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. second-person singular imperative of barmaq (to go, to arrive)

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m

  1. bar (a business selling beverages)
  2. bar (the counter of such a premises)
  3. bar (a cabinet used to store alcoholic drinks in a private house or a hotel room)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Borrowing from modern European languages, originally coined based on Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m

  1. bar, a non-SI unit of pressure equal to 100,000 pascals
Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bar in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bar in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin bibere.

Verb[edit]

bar (second-person plural present baite)

  1. to drink

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Danish bar, Old West Norse berr (with ʀ-umlaut), from Proto-Germanic *bazaz.

Adjective[edit]

bar (neuter bart, plural and definite singular attributive bare)

  1. bare, naked
  2. sheer, pure
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar c (singular definite baren, plural indefinite barer)

  1. bar (business licensed to sell intoxicating beverages, counter of such a premises)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar c (singular definite baren, plural indefinite bar)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. past tense of bære

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bars, diminutive barretje n)

  1. A bar, counter, drink cabinet.
  2. A bar, pub serving alcohol.
Derived terms[edit]

-types of establishment

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: bar

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French barhaine, probably of Germanic origin, possibly Frankish *baʀ (bare; barren).

Adjective[edit]

bar (comparative barder, superlative barst)

  1. harsh, tough (used mainly with koude (cold), or omstandigheden (conditions))
  2. barren, inhospitable, bare
  3. crude, grim, unfriendly
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of bar
uninflected bar
inflected barre
comparative barder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial bar barder het barst
het barste
indefinite m./f. sing. barre bardere barste
n. sing. bar barder barste
plural barre bardere barste
definite barre bardere barste
partitive bars barders
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb[edit]

bar

  1. extremely (only in a negative sense)

Etymology 4[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined c. 1900.

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. bar (a unit of pressure, equal to 100,000 pascals)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Indonesian: bar

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

Faroese[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. he, it bore, carried:: 1st and 3rd person singular past tense form of bera (to bear, to carry)

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of bera (group v-54)
infinitive bera
supine borið
participle (a26)1 berandi borin
present past
first singular beri bar
second singular bert bart
third singular ber bar
plural bera bóru
imperative
singular ber!
plural berið!
1Only the past participle being declined.

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English bar. Doublet of barre.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bars)

  1. A bar (establishment)
  2. A bar (counter)
Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Romanian: bar

Etymology 2[edit]

Of Germanic origin, from Proto-Germanic *barsaz (perch).

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bars)

  1. A bass (fish)
Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bares)

  1. bar, coffee shop, café, pub (an establishment where refreshments and alcohol drinks are served)

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar and this from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bares)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German bar.

Adjective[edit]

bar (not comparable)

  1. bare
Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bar

  1. in cash
  2. pure

Preposition[edit]

bar

  1. (+genitive) without
    Synonyms: ohne, sonder, außer, ausschließlich

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bar (invariable)

  1. Obsolete form of paar (a few, couple).

Further reading[edit]

  • bar” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • bar” in Duden online

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

bar

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar (1), from Old French barre.

Noun[edit]

bar m (genitive singular bars, nominative plural barir)

  1. bar (establishment offering alcoholic drinks for consumption on the premises)
  2. bar (counter at which such beverages are sold or offered)
  3. (by extension) a counter where a buffet or a specialized kind of food is offered
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar (2), from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar n (genitive singular bars, nominative plural bör)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative active of bera

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈbar]
  • Hyphenation: bar

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch bar, from English bar, from Middle English barre, from Old French barre (beam, bar, gate, barrier), from Vulgar Latin *barra, of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

bar (first-person possessive barku, second-person possessive barmu, third-person possessive barnya)

  1. bar, pub: an establishment where alcohol and sometimes other refreshments are served.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch bar, from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined c. 1900.

Noun[edit]

bar (first-person possessive barku, second-person possessive barmu, third-person possessive barnya)

  1. (physics) bar: a non-SI unit of pressure equal to 100,000 pascals, approximately equal to atmospheric pressure at sea level.

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bar, from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m (genitive singular bair, nominative plural bair)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)

Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bar bhar mbar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "bar" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “bar” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbar/
  • Rhymes: -ar
  • Hyphenation: bàr

Noun[edit]

bar m

  1. bar (place serving drinks)
    C'è un bar qui vicino?Is there a bar nearby?
  2. café
  3. bar (unit of pressure)

Derived terms[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of bārt
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of bārt
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of bārt
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of bārt
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of bārt
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of bārt

Marshallese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bar

  1. empty

Adverb[edit]

bar

  1. again
  2. also
  3. more

Determiner[edit]

bar

  1. more

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. head
  2. rock
  3. top; tip

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of bor

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Persian بار(bâr).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar m

  1. burden (a heavy load)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse berr and Old Danish bar.

Adjective[edit]

bar (neuter singular bart, definite singular and plural bare, comparative barere, indefinite superlative barest, definite superlative bareste)

  1. bare, naked
    • 2014, "Ikke provosèr ham", by Inger Torill Jørgensen, eBokNorden AS →ISBN [4]
      Han kom tettere inn til henne, la armen rundt ryggen hennes og bøyet hodet sitt ned mot hennes bare skulder, kysset den.
      He came closer to her, put his arm around her back and bowed his head down to her bare shoulder, and kissed it.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (definite singular baren, indefinite plural barer, definite plural barene)

  1. a bar (place where alcohol is served)
  2. a bar (sandbank at the mouth of a river or harbour)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse barr.

Noun[edit]

bar n (definite singular baret, uncountable)

  1. the needles of the conifers, twigs and branches of conifers
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 bar (enhet) on Norwegian Wikipedia

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m (definite singular baren, indefinite plural bar, definite plural barene)

  1. bar (a non-SI unit of pressure)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. simple past of bære

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. past tense of bera

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (definite singular baren, indefinite plural barar, definite plural barane)

  1. a bar (place where alcohol is served)
  2. a bar (sandbank at the mouth of a river or harbour)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined circa 1900.

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

bar m (definite singular baren, indefinite plural barar, definite plural barane)

  1. bar (a non-SI unit of pressure)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse barr.

Noun[edit]

bar n (definite singular baret, uncountable)

  1. the needles of the conifers, twigs and branches of conifers
    • 1860, Aasmund Olavsson Vinje, "Vaaren":
      Derfor eg fann millom Bjørkar og Bar i Vaaren ei Gaata []
      Therefore I found, between the birches and conifers, in spring a riddle []
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bar (masculine and feminine bar, neuter bart, definite singular and plural bare, comparative barare, indefinite superlative barast, definite superlative baraste)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of berr
  2. (pre-1938) alternative form of berr

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *bair.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bār m

  1. boar

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *baʀ, from Proto-Germanic *bazaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bar

  1. bare

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bar

  1. Alternative form of for (your pl)

Old Norse[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative active of bera

Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *baʀ, from Proto-Germanic *bazaz.

Adjective[edit]

bār

  1. bare


Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: bâr
    • German Low German: baar

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse *barr (Old West Norse berr), from Proto-Germanic *bazaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰosós.

Adjective[edit]

bar

  1. bare

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m inan (diminutive barek)

  1. bar, luncheon bar, buffet
  2. bar (a long table or counter where drinks are served)
    Synonym: bufet
Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjectives
nouns
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin barium.

Noun[edit]

Chemical element
Ba
Previous: cez (Cs)
Next: lantan (La)

bar m inan

  1. barium
Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m inan

  1. bar (unit of pressure equal to 100,000 pascals)
Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • bar in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • IPA(key): (Caipira Brazil) [ˈbaɹ], [ˈbaɻ]
  • IPA(key): (South Brazil) [ˈbaɻ], [ˈbaɾ]
  • Hyphenation: bar

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bares)

  1. pub; bar (establishment that serves alcoholic beverages primarily)

Etymology 2[edit]

Originally from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bars)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)

Romani[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Prakrit 𑀯𑀸𑀟 (vāḍa), from Sanskrit वाट (vāṭa)[1][2] or Sanskrit वाटी (vāṭī)[2].

Noun[edit]

bar f (plural barǎ)

  1. enclosure

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bara)

  1. Alternative form of barr

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “vāṭa1”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 670
  2. 2.0 2.1 Boretzky, Norbert; Igla, Birgit (1994), “bar”, in Wörterbuch Romani-Deutsch-Englisch für den südosteuropäischen Raum : mit einer Grammatik der Dialektvarianten [Romani-German-English dictionary for the Southern European region] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, →ISBN, page 20

Further reading[edit]

  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “i/e bar I, -ǎ- ʒ. -ǎ, -ěn-”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, pages 73-74

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bar.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bari)

  1. bar

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑р)

  1. public house, bar
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined circa 1900.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑р)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of bàrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bȁr (Cyrillic spelling ба̏р)

  1. at least

Etymology 4[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bъrъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑р) (regional)

  1. foxtail millet (Setaria italica)
    Synonym: mȕhār
  2. pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum)
    Synonyms: kòšćan, bìsērno prȍso
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • bar” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • bar” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • bar” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • bar” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m inan

  1. public house, bar
Inflection[edit]
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. bȃr
gen. sing. bȃra
singular dual plural
nominative bȃr bȃra bȃri
accusative bȃr bȃra bȃre
genitive bȃra bȃrov bȃrov
dative bȃru bȃroma bȃrom
locative bȃru bȃrih bȃrih
instrumental bȃrom bȃroma bȃri

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight), coined circa 1900.

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m inan

  1. bar (unit of pressure)
Inflection[edit]
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. bȃr
gen. sing. bȃra
singular dual plural
nominative bȃr bȃra bȃri
accusative bȃr bȃra bȃre
genitive bȃra bȃrov bȃrov
dative bȃru bȃroma bȃrom
locative bȃru bȃrih bȃrih
instrumental bȃrom bȃroma bȃri

Etymology 3[edit]

Considering its Ottoman Turkish origin and smaller frequency, from Serbo-Croatian bȁr.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bȃr

  1. at least
    Synonym: vsaj
  2. even though
    Synonym: čeprav
  3. otherwise, for else
    Synonym: sicer

Etymology 4[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *bъrъ.

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃr m inan

  1. foxtail millet (Setaria italica)
    Synonym: laški muhvič
  2. pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum)
    Synonym: biserno proso
Inflection[edit]
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nominative bȃr
genitive bȃra
singular
nominative bȃr
accusative bȃr
genitive bȃra
dative bȃru
locative bȃru
instrumental bȃrom

Further reading[edit]

  • bar”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. Alternative spelling of baro

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bar. Doublet of barra.

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bares)

  1. bar, coffee shop, café, pub (an establishment where refreshments and alcohol drinks are served)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English bar and this from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar m (plural bares)

  1. bar (unit of pressure)

Further reading[edit]


Sumerian[edit]

Romanization[edit]

bar

  1. Romanization of 𒁇 (bar)

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish bar, from Old Norse *barr (Old West Norse berr), from Proto-Germanic *bazaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰosós.

Adjective[edit]

bar (comparative barare, superlative barast)

  1. bare, uncovered; not covered by e.g. clothes (about people), fur (about certain animals) or a snow cover (about the ground)
Declension[edit]
Inflection of bar
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular bar barare barast
Neuter singular bart barare barast
Plural bara barare barast
Masculine plural3 bare barare barast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 bare barare baraste
All bara barare baraste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See bära.

Verb[edit]

bar

  1. past tense of bära.

Etymology 3[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English bar.

Noun[edit]

bar c

  1. a bar, pub; place where mainly alcoholic drinks are served.
  2. a bar, a bar counter
Descendants[edit]
Declension[edit]
Declension of bar 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bar baren barer barerna
Genitive bars barens barers barernas

Etymology 4[edit]

Originally from Ancient Greek βάρος (báros, weight).

Noun[edit]

bar c

  1. A bar; a unit of pressure

References[edit]

  • bar in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)

Anagrams[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. bar (business selling alcoholic drinks)
    Synonyms: inuman, barikan, taberna
  2. (law) bar exam
  3. iron or steel bar
    Synonym: baras

Derived terms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Armenian պար (par, dance).

Noun[edit]

bar (definite accusative barı, plural barlar)

  1. (dialectal) dance, round dance

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative bar
Definite accusative barı
Singular Plural
Nominative bar barlar
Definite accusative barı barları
Dative bara barlara
Locative barda barlarda
Ablative bardan barlardan
Genitive barın barların

References[edit]

  • Ačaṙean, Hračʿeay (1971–1979), “պար”, in Hayerēn armatakan baṙaran [Armenian Etymological Dictionary] (in Armenian), 2nd edition, a reprint of the original 1926–1935 seven-volume edition, Yerevan: University Press
  • bar”, in Türkiye'de halk ağzından derleme sözlüğü [Compilation Dictionary of Popular Speech in Turkey] (in Turkish), Ankara: Türk Dil Kurumu, 1963–1982

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.


Wakhi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Iranian *dwā́ram, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *dʰwā́ram, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer-. Related to Persian در‎(dar).

Noun[edit]

bar

  1. door

Zazaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Persian بار(bâr).

Noun[edit]

bar ?

  1. load, burden