bare

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Baré, bāre, bārē, barē, båre, and Bäre

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bare, bar, from Old English bær (bare, naked, open), from Proto-West Germanic *baʀ, from Proto-Germanic *bazaz (bare, naked), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰosós, from *bʰos- (bare, barefoot).

Cognate with Scots bare, bair (bare), Saterland Frisian bar (bare), West Frisian baar (bare), Dutch baar (bare), German bar (bare), Swedish bar (bare), Icelandic ber (bare), Lithuanian basas (barefoot, bare), Polish bosy (barefoot).

Adjective[edit]

bare (comparative barer, superlative barest)

  1. Minimal; that is or are just sufficient.
    a bare majority
  2. Naked, uncovered.
  3. Having no supplies.
    a room bare of furniture
    The cupboard was bare.
    • 2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, "[1]," New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
      Localities across New Jersey imposed curfews to prevent looting. In Monmouth, Ocean and other counties, people waited for hours for gasoline at the few stations that had electricity. Supermarket shelves were stripped bare.
  4. Having no decoration.
    The walls of this room are bare — why not hang some paintings on them?
  5. Having had what usually covers (something) removed.
    The trees were left bare after the swarm of locusts devoured all the leaves.
  6. (MLE, Toronto, not comparable) A lot or lots of.
    It's bare money to get in the club each time, man.
    It's taking bare time.
  7. With head uncovered; bareheaded.
    • [1633], George Herbert, “The Church-porch”, in [Nicholas Ferrar], editor, The Temple: Sacred Poems, and Private Ejaculations, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: [] Thomas Buck and Roger Daniel; and are to be sold by Francis Green, [], OCLC 1048966979; reprinted London: Elliot Stock, [], 1885, OCLC 54151361, page 14:
      When once thy foot enters the church, be bare. / God is more there, then thou: for thou art there / Onely by his permiſſion.
  8. Without anything to cover up or conceal one's thoughts or actions; open to view; exposed.
  9. (figuratively) Mere; without embellishment.
  10. Threadbare, very worn.
  11. Not insured.
    • 1987, 1 December, ABA Journal (page 86)
      Before the company was formed, the firm went bare for about three months in 1985, but it now has prior acts coverage for that time.
    • 1994, David S. Haviland, The Architect's Handbook of Professional Practice (page 310)
      That a firm chooses to go bare has no effect on whether it gets sued or not.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from bare (adjective)
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bare

  1. (dialect) Barely.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      The fiend had bare departed when Ailie came over the threshold to find the auld carline glunching over the fire.
    • 2009, Allan Cole; Chris Bunch, The Wars of the Shannons:
      He finally came back to himself and asked why the furor. "Why," Lucy said, "because this is Christmas Eve. We have bare enough time to get ready for the ball, after dinner, as it is."
    • 2011, Elizabeth Vaughan, Warprize:
      “I've bare enough for these two, much less fill your belly.”
  2. (Britain, slang) Very; significantly.
    That pissed me off bare.
    That's bare stupid.
  3. (slang) Without a condom.
    • 2000, Northeast African Studies - Volume 7, page 119:
      While none of the participants had complete confidence in condoms, they continued to use them as a better alternative than “going in bare".
    • 2002, The Society of Malawi Journal - Volumes 55-58, page 70:
      It would be fine to have these women bare, without condoms.
    • 2010, M. L. Matthews, I Am Not the Father: Narratives of Men Falsely Accused of Paternity, →ISBN:
      I like to go bare. I don't like wearing condoms, actually I hate 'em.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare (plural bares)

  1. (‘the bare’) The surface, the (bare) skin.
    • 1599, John Marston, Antonio and Mellida
      In sad good earnest, sir, you have toucht the very bare of naked truth [...]
    • 2002, Darren Shan, Hunters of the dusk: 7:
      Vancha clasped the bare of my neck and squeezed amiably.
  2. Surface; body; substance.
  3. (architecture) That part of a roofing slate, shingle, tile, or metal plate, which is exposed to the weather.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English baren, from Old English barian, from Proto-Germanic *bazōną (to bare, make bare).

Verb[edit]

bare (third-person singular simple present bares, present participle baring, simple past and past participle bared)

  1. (transitive) To uncover; to reveal.
    She bared her teeth at him.
Usage notes[edit]

The verb should not be confused with the verb bear.

Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected forms.

Verb[edit]

bare

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of bear

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bare (comparative bareago, superlative bareen, excessive bareegi)

  1. calm
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare anim

  1. slug
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare inan

  1. spleen
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • bare” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • bare” in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • bare” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare

  1. vocative singular of bar

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːrə/, [ˈb̥ɑːɑ]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the adjective bar (naked).

Adverb[edit]

bare

  1. just
  2. simply
  3. only, merely

Conjunction[edit]

bare

  1. I wish, I hope, if only (introduces a wish)
    • 1979, Tove Ditlevsen, Vi har kun hinanden: To som elsker hinanden (→ISBN)
      Bare vi var alene.
      I wish we were alone.
    • 2014, Pernille Eybye, Blodets bånd #1: Blodsøstre, Tellerup A/S (→ISBN)
      Bare jeg kunne blive hele natten," fortsatte han.
      "If only I could stay all night", he continued.
    • 2013, Lyngby-Taarbæk Bibliotekerne, Tanker om tid: 15 udvalgte noveller, BoD – Books on Demand (→ISBN), page 43
      Bare jeg kunne spole tiden tilbage.
      If only I could rewind time.
  2. if only (introduces a conditional subclause)
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective[edit]

bare

  1. inflection of bar:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bare

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of baren

German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bare

  1. inflection of bar:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.re/
  • Rhymes: -are
  • Hyphenation: bà‧re

Noun[edit]

bare f

  1. plural of bara

Anagrams[edit]


Lithuanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare m

  1. locative/vocative singular of baras

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective[edit]

bare

  1. best

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *bāra, from Proto-West Germanic *bāru, from Proto-Germanic *bērō.

Noun[edit]

bâre f

  1. bier, stretcher

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: baar

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of bor

Miriwung[edit]

Verb[edit]

bare

  1. to stand

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Persian باره(bâre, subject, issue).

Noun[edit]

bare m

  1. topic
  2. hashtag

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bare

  1. definite singular of bar
  2. plural of bar

Adverb[edit]

bare

  1. only, merely, just
  2. but

Conjunction[edit]

bare

  1. if; as long as

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adverb[edit]

bare

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by berre

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bare (Cyrillic spelling баре)

  1. vocative singular of bȃr

Noun[edit]

bare (Cyrillic spelling баре)

  1. inflection of bȁra:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bare

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of bar.

Anagrams[edit]