slug

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English[edit]

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The Spanish slug (Arion vulgaris)

Etymology[edit]

Originally referred to a lazy person, from Middle English slugge, probably of Scandinavian or Old Norse origin; compare dialectal Norwegian sluggje(heavy, slow person).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slug ‎(plural slugs)

  1. Any of many terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks, having no (or only a rudimentary) shell.
  2. (obsolete) A slow, lazy person; a sluggard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?) Why, lamb! Why, lady! Fie, you slug-a-bed. Romeo and Juliet
  3. A bullet (projectile).
  4. A counterfeit coin, especially one used to steal from vending machines.
  5. A shot of a drink, usually alcoholic.
  6. (journalism) A title, name or header, a catchline, a short phrase or title to indicate the content of a newspaper or magazine story for editing use.
  7. (physics, rarely used) the Imperial (English) unit of mass that accelerates by 1 foot per second squared (1 ft/s²) when a force of one pound-force (lbf) is exerted on it.
  8. A discrete mass of a material that moves as a unit, usually through another material.
    • 1973, Pulp & paper international, volume 15:
      When these layers are recovered they inevitably result in a slug of sawdust which goes into the digester and tends to plug the screens in a Kamyr digester.
    • 1987, United States. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, United States. Board of Mine Operations Appeals, Occupational safety and health decisions:
      Then, just a few nights before August 6, Gilbert testified that a "slug of sand-rock" weighing an estimate of one to two tons fell on his continuous miner as he was taking a cut, approximately fifteen feet from where he was standing.
    • 1998, Orrin H. Pilkey; Katharine L. Dixon, The Corps and the Shore, page 159:
      Tvpically, enough sand is emplaced to create a slug of sand that moves along the shore causing noticeable and somewhat dramatic local changes.
    • 1998, N. A. Krylov; A. A. Bokserman, Evgeniĭ Romanovich Stavrovskiĭ, The oil industry of the former Soviet Union, page 112:
    • 2005, Sam Mannan; Frank P. Lees, Lee's loss prevention in the process industries, page 16-115:
      Another phenomenon investigated was a slug of water falling through the cloud.
    • 2007, William Lauer; Fred Sanchez, Disinfection of pipelines and storage facilities field guide, page 54:
      This method uses a slug of 100 mg/L chlorinated water as a slug that moves along the length of the pipeline. The slug is a percentage of the total length of the pipeline.
    • 2010, Nancy E. McTigue; James M. Symons, American Water Works Association, The water dictionary: a comprehensive reference of water terminology, page 556:
      For example, a slug of iron rust might appear because of the shearing action of a high-demand flow that loosens a previously deposited iron precipitate.
    • 2010, Robert A. Meyers, Extreme Environmental Events, page 1198:
      These experiments investigate the ascent of a slug of gas in a vertical liquid-filed tube featuring a flare that abruptly doubles the cross sectional area.
    • 2011, Bill Calfee, The Art of Rimfire Accuracy, page 125:
      You had to learn to grab the teat up next to the udder with your thumb and side of your first finger, grab a slug of milk and progressively squeeze it down the teat past your middle finger, ring finger and little finger
  9. A motile pseudoplasmodium formed by amoebae working together.
  10. (television editing) A black screen.
  11. (letterpress typography) A piece of type metal imprinted by a Linotype machine; also a black mark placed in the margin to indicate an error.
  12. (regional) A stranger picked up as a passenger to enable legal use of high occupancy vehicle lanes.
  13. (US, slang, District of Columbia) A hitchhiking commuter.
  14. (web design) The last part of a clean URL, the displayed resource name, similar to a filename.
  15. (obsolete) A hindrance, an obstruction.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  16. A ship that sails slowly.
    • Samuel Pepys
      His rendezvous for his fleet, and for all slugs to come to, should be between Calais and Dover.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  17. A blow, usually with the fist.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

slug ‎(third-person singular simple present slugs, present participle slugging, simple past and past participle slugged)

  1. To drink quickly; to gulp.
  2. To down a shot.
  3. (transitive) To hit very hard, usually with the fist.
    He insulted my mother, so I slugged him.
    The fighter slugged his opponent into unconsciousness.
  4. To take part in casual carpooling; to form ad hoc, informal carpools for commuting, essentially a variation of ride-share commuting and hitchhiking.
    • 1998 July 23, “Ramsey Vows to Find New Sites for Commuter `Slug Lines'”, in Washington Post:
      "We believe in car-pooling, but let's do it without restricting traffic. ..." Sam Snyder, 51, of Burke, who has been slugging to his job at the US Customs ....
    • 2002 December 13, Joshua E. Rodd, dc.urban-planning, Usenet, message-ID <FmpK9.110446$%p6.11081387@twister.neo.rr.com>:
      no sane person would attempt to commute that far every day. Sure they do. I've often slugged to Fredericksburg and back. The VRE carries hundreds of people per day, and the I-95 HOV lanes carry tens of thousands of people each day.
  5. (intransitive, of a bullet) To become reduced in diameter, or changed in shape, by passing from a larger to a smaller part of the bore of the barrel.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To move slowly or sluggishly; to lie idle.
    • Spenser
      To slug in sloth and sensual delight.
  7. (transitive) To load with a slug or slugs.
    to slug a gun
  8. To make sluggish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Manx[edit]

Verb[edit]

slug ‎(verbal noun sluggey, past participle sluggit)

  1. to swallow, swig, slug, guzzle, draw
  2. to devour, gorge, gulp
  3. to engulf

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
slug lug
after "yn", tlug
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Noun[edit]

slug m ‎(genitive singular slug, plural sluggyn)

  1. swallow, swig, draught

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
slug lug
after "yn", tlug
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

slug

  1. cunning

Declension[edit]

Inflection of slug
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular slug slugare slugast
Neuter singular slugt slugare slugast
Plural sluga slugare slugast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 sluge slugare slugaste
All sluga slugare slugaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.

Related terms[edit]