casual

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French casuel, from Late Latin cāsuālis (happening by chance), from Latin cāsus (event) (English case), from cadere (to fall) (whence English cadence).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

casual (comparative more casual, superlative most casual)

  1. Happening by chance.
    They only had casual meetings.
  2. Coming without regularity; occasional or incidental.
    The purchase of donuts was just a casual expense.
  3. Employed irregularly.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 17, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything. In a moment she had dropped to the level of a casual labourer.
    He was just a casual worker.
  4. Careless.
    • 2007, Nick Holland, The Girl on the Bus (page 117)
      I removed my jacket and threw it casually over the back of the settee.
  5. Happening or coming to pass without design.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 8, in The China Governess[1]:
      It was a casual sneer, obviously one of a long line. There was hatred behind it, but of a quiet, chronic type, nothing new or unduly virulent, and he was taken aback by the flicker of amazed incredulity that passed over the younger man's ravaged face.
    • 2012, Jeff Miller, Grown at Glen Garden: Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, and the Little Texas Golf Course that Propelled Them to Stardom
      Hogan assumed the entire creek bed was to be played as a casual hazard, moved his ball out and assessed himself a one-stroke penalty.
  6. Informal, relaxed.
  7. Designed for informal or everyday use.

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

casual (plural casuals)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A worker who is only working for a company occasionally, not as its permanent employee.
  2. A soldier temporarily at a place of duty, usually en route to another place of duty.
  3. (Britain) A member of a group of football hooligans who wear expensive designer clothing to avoid police attention; see casual (subculture).
  4. One who receives relief for a night in a parish to which he does not belong; a vagrant.
  5. (video games, informal, derogatory) A player of casual games.
    The devs dumbed the game down so the casuals could enjoy it.
  6. (fandom slang) A person whose engagement with media is relaxed or superficial.
    • 1972, Lee C. Garrison, "The Needs of Motion Picture Audiences", California Management Review, Volume 15, Issue 2, Winter 1972, page 149:
      Casuals outnumbered regulars in the art-house audience two to one.
    • 2010, Jennifer Gillan, Television and New Media: Must-Click TV, page 16:
      Most often, when a series is marketed toward casuals, the loyals feel that their interests and needs are not being met.
    • 2018, E. J. Nielsen, "The Gay Elephant Meta in the Room: Sherlock and the Johnlock Conspiracy", in Queerbaiting and Fandom: Teasing Fans Through Homoerotic Possibilities (ed. Joseph Brennan), page 91:
      Treating a gay relationship as a puzzle that must be pursued by the clever viewers and hidden from “casuals” until a narrative reveal at the eleventh hour seems antithetical to the idea of normalized representation that TJLCers claim as the main reason they want Johnlock to be canon, []
  7. (Britain, dated) A tramp.
    • 1983, Reg Butler, Reg Butler, London: Tate Gallery London, page 14:
      I was a boy in 1922 or 1923, when buses first started to run between the village and the town; there were tramps, casuals as they were called; the whole pattern of my boyhood was knit into a very loaded atmosphere of human character.

Translations[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

casual (masculine and feminine plural casuals)

  1. casual
  2. unplanned

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

casual m or f (plural casuais, comparable)

  1. casual (happening by chance)
    Synonym: fortuito
  2. casual (coming without regularity)
    Synonym: ocasional
  3. casual (designed for informal or everyday use)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

casual (plural casuales)

  1. casual
  2. accidental
  3. coincidental, chance

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Cebuano: kaswal

Further reading[edit]