sport

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See also: Sport, SPORT, and šport

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old French desport, variant of deport (fun, amusement), from Latin deportāre, present active infinitive of deportō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sport (not comparable)

  1. Suitable for use in athletic activities or for casual or informal wear.
    Jen has a new pair of sport shoes, and a new sports bra.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport (countable and uncountable, plural sports)

  1. (countable) Any activity that uses physical exertion or skills competitively under a set of rules that is not based on aesthetics.
  2. (countable) A person who exhibits either good or bad sportsmanship.
    • Jen may have won, but she was sure a poor sport; she laughed at the loser.
    • The loser was a good sport, and congratulated Jen on her performance.
  3. (countable) Somebody who behaves or reacts in an admirable manner, a good sport.
    • You're such a sport! You never get upset when we tease you.
  4. (obsolete) That which diverts, and makes mirth; pastime; amusement.
    • Shakespeare
      Think it but a minute spent in sport.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      Her sports were such as carried riches of knowledge upon the stream of delight.
  5. (obsolete) Mockery; derision.
    • Shakespeare
      Then make sport at me; then let me be your jest.
  6. (countable) A toy; a plaything; an object of mockery.
    • Dryden
      flitting leaves, the sport of every wind
    • John Clarke
      Never does man appear to greater disadvantage than when he is the sport of his own ungoverned passions.
  7. (uncountable) Gaming for money as in racing, hunting, fishing.
  8. (biology, botany, zoology, countable) A plant or an animal, or part of a plant or animal, which has some peculiarity not usually seen in the species; an abnormal variety or growth. The term encompasses both mutants and organisms with non-genetic developmental abnormalities such as birth defects.
  9. (slang, countable) A sportsman; a gambler.
  10. (slang, countable) One who consorts with disreputable people, including prostitutes.
  11. (obsolete, uncountable) An amorous dalliance.
    • Charlie and Lisa enjoyed a bit of sport after their hike.
  12. (informal, usually singular) A friend or acquaintance (chiefly used when speaking to the friend in question)
    • 1924 July, Ellis Butler, “The Little Tin Godlets”, The Rotarian, volume 25, number 1, Rotary International, page 14: 
      "Say, sport!" he would say briskly.
  13. (obsolete) Play; idle jingle.
    • Broome
      An author who should introduce such a sport of words upon our stage would meet with small applause.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sport (third-person singular simple present sports, present participle sporting, simple past and past participle sported)

  1. (intransitive) To amuse oneself, to play.
    children sporting on the green
  2. (intransitive) To mock or tease, treat lightly, toy with.
    Jen sports with Bill's emotions.
    • Tillotson
      He sports with his own life.
  3. (transitive) To display; to have as a notable feature.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8845: 
      [The researchers] noticed many of their pieces of [plastic marine] debris sported surface pits around two microns across. Such pits are about the size of a bacterial cell. Closer examination showed that some of these pits did, indeed, contain bacteria, […].
    Jen's sporting a new pair of shoes;  he was sporting a new wound from the combat
  4. (reflexive) To divert; to amuse; to make merry.
    • Bible, Isa. lvii. 4
      Against whom do ye sport yourselves?
  5. (transitive) To represent by any kind of play.
    • John Dryden
      Now sporting on thy lyre the loves of youth.
  6. To practise the diversions of the field or the turf; to be given to betting, as upon races.
  7. To assume suddenly a new and different character from the rest of the plant or from the type of the species; said of a bud, shoot, plant, or animal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Darwin to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport m

  1. sport

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport f (plural sporten, diminutive sportje n)

  1. sport
  2. step on a ladder

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sport

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of sporten
  2. imperative of sporten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English sport

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport m (plural sports)

  1. sport

Derived terms[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport (plural sportok)

  1. sport

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport

  1. sport

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport m (invariable)

  1. sport (activity that uses physical skills, often competitive)
  2. hobby, pastime
    fare qualcosa per sport (to do something for fun)

Derived terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English sport

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sport m

  1. sport

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English sport.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

spȍrt m (Cyrillic spelling спо̏рт)

  1. sport

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sport

  1. supine of spörja.