slag

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See also: šlag

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German slagge, slaggen (slag, dross), from Old Saxon *slaggo, from Proto-West Germanic *slaggō, from Proto-Germanic *slaggô, from Proto-Germanic *slagōną (to strike) + *-gô (diminutive suffix). Compare Middle Low German slāgen (to strike), since originally the splinters struck off from the metal by hammering, from *slagōn, from Proto-West Germanic *slagōn. Compare also Old Saxon slegi, from Proto-West Germanic *slagi.

See also Dutch slak, German Schlacke, Swedish slagg; also compare English slay.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /slæɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun[edit]

slag (countable and uncountable, plural slags)

  1. Waste material from a mine.
    • 2011, Vivienne Dockerty, A Woman Undefeated, page 54,
      After the big village, the scenery had returned to grass and woodland, but this had now given way to ugly mounds of discarded slag. Beyond the slag was a colliery with its machinery and smoking chimney, making the whole area look grim and austere.
  2. Scum that forms on the surface of molten metal.
    • 2006, Melisa W. Lai, Michele Burns Ewald, Chapter 95: Silver, Martin J. Wonsiewicz, Karen G. Edmonson, Peter J. Boyle (editors), Goldfrank′s Toxicologic Emergencies, 8th Edition, page 1358,
      In Asia Minor and on islands in the Aegean Sea, dumps of slag (scum formed by molten metal surface oxidation) demonstrate that silver was being separated from lead as early as 5000 BC.
    • 2009, John Hoerr, Monongahela Dusk, page 255,
      He leans out over the track and skims slag off the top of the boiling steel, risking what is called “catching a flyer,” which occurs when hot metal explodes out of the mold, spraying everyone in the vicinity.
  3. Impurities formed and separated out when a metal is smelted from ore; vitrified cinders.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion[1]:
      Buried within the Mediterranean littoral are some seventy to ninety million tons of slag from ancient smelting, about a third of it concentrated in Iberia. This ceaseless industrial fueling caused the deforestation of an estimated fifty to seventy million acres of woodlands.
    • 2008, Barbara S. Ottaway, Ben Roberts, The Emergence of Metalworking, Andrew Jones (editor), Prehistoric Europe: Theory and Practice, page 207,
      Consequently, mounds of large ‘cakes’ of slag are often found near the smelting sites of the Late Bronze Age, as for example at Ramsau in Austria (Doonan et al. 1996).
    Synonyms: dross, recrement, scoria
  4. Hard aggregate remaining as a residue from blast furnaces, sometimes used as a surfacing material.
    • 2006, Jan R. Prusinski, 44: Slag as a Cementitious Material, Joseph F. Lamond, James H. Pielert (editors), Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials, page 517,
      During blast furnace operations, the plant operator pays careful attention to the slag chemistry (both composition and variability) as slag behavior is a major consideration in ensuring the quality of hot metal (molten iron).
    • 2010, Yuri N. Toulouevski, Ilyaz Y. Zinurov, Innovation in Electric Arc Furnaces, Springer, page 16,
      All these properties are determined by slag composition and its temperature. In basic slags, foaming ability increases as SiO2 concentration grows.
  5. Scoria associated with a volcano.
  6. (UK, derogatory, dated) A coward.
  7. (UK, chiefly Cockney, derogatory) A contemptible person, a scumbag.
  8. (slang, derogatory) A prostitute, or a woman who acts like one; a slut.
    • 1984, Tristan Jones, Heart of Oak, 1997, paperback edition, page 260,
      We never talked about that, of course; we talked about how we could find a woman in the Dilly, and if the Yanks had taken them all, how we could always resort to the peroxided older slags who hung out around the side doors to Waterloo station and did knee tremblers for the Yanks.
    • 2002, Josephine Cox, The Woman Who Left, 2012, ebook, unnumbered page,
      Slag! Wait till I tell Jacob what we′ve been doing – and I will, you mark my words! He′ll want nowt to do with you then, will he, eh? He′ll see you for what you really are. A cheap and nasty little bitch!’
    • 2008, Ashley Lister, Swingers - Female Confidential, page 31,
      [] He was a lovely man but, when I told him I wanted to continue swinging, he freaked out and called me a slag.’
    • 2010, The Coast, Halifax, Canada, [2],
      [] To the lady that came in to my coffee shop today and ripped on me and my fellow employees for being too slow: eat shit, you miserable slag!’
    • 2016 December 3, Millie B (lyrics and music), “Soph Aspin Send”, performed by Millie B:
      Soph, yeah, you can't murk me / You're a slag, riddled with STDs

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

slag (third-person singular simple present slags, present participle slagging, simple past and past participle slagged)

  1. (transitive) To produce slag.
  2. (intransitive) To become slag; to agglomerate when heated below the fusion point.
  3. (transitive) To reduce to slag.
  4. (slang, transitive, sometimes with "off") To talk badly about; to malign or denigrate (someone).
    • 2010, Courtenay Young, Help Yourself Towards Mental Health, page 344:
      If you slag off the other person, then—to the extent that your child identifies with that person as their parent—you are slagging off a part of them.
    • 2011, John Davies, Slings and Arrows (page 109)
      Rather than wait for her to start slagging my mother, I would disappear for a couple of days and inevitably, because I was getting no love at home, I began to stray once again.
  5. (intransitive, Australia, slang) To spit.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse slag, slagr from Proto-Germanic *slagą, *slagiz, cognate with German Schlag.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /slaːˀɣ/, [ˈsl̥æˀj], [ˈsl̥æˀ], (in the sense “game” and some fixed expressions) IPA(key): /slaɣ/, [ˈsl̥ɑw]

Noun[edit]

slag n (singular definite slaget, plural indefinite slag)

  1. A hit, punch
  2. A beat
  3. A battle (between two armies or, metaphorically two competing parties)
  4. A game.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch slach, from Old Dutch slag, from Proto-West Germanic *slagi, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slag m (plural slagen, diminutive slagje n)

  1. A blow, knock, strike
  2. A stroke, limb movement; a style of movement, notably style of swimming
  3. A twist, turn
  4. A beat, pulsation
  5. A stroke, blow, hit, physical impact
  6. A count, occurrence; the striking of a clock
  7. A battle, violent confrontation
  8. (ball sports) A strike, hit
    Antonym: wijd
  9. A strike, fast move

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Negerhollands: slaa

Noun[edit]

slag n (plural slagen, diminutive slagje n)

  1. A kind, type, sort.
  2. A parcel, plot, premise (stretch of land).

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slag n (genitive singular slags, plural sløg)

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. (medicine) A cardiac stroke.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces
  4. A kind; sort.
  5. (biology, taxonomy) A species.

Declension[edit]

Declension of slag
n6 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative slag slagið sløg sløgini
accusative slag slagið sløg sløgini
dative slag, slagi slagnum, slaginum sløgum sløgunum
genitive slags slagsins slaga slaganna

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

[1938] From German Schlauch, from Middle High German slūch (slough, skin shed by a snake).[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slag (plural slagok)

  1. hose, tube (a flexible tube conveying water or other fluid)
    Synonyms: tömlő, öntözőcső

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative slag slagok
accusative slagot slagokat
dative slagnak slagoknak
instrumental slaggal slagokkal
causal-final slagért slagokért
translative slaggá slagokká
terminative slagig slagokig
essive-formal slagként slagokként
essive-modal
inessive slagban slagokban
superessive slagon slagokon
adessive slagnál slagoknál
illative slagba slagokba
sublative slagra slagokra
allative slaghoz slagokhoz
elative slagból slagokból
delative slagról slagokról
ablative slagtól slagoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
slagé slagoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
slagéi slagokéi
Possessive forms of slag
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. slagom slagjaim
2nd person sing. slagod slagjaid
3rd person sing. slagja slagjai
1st person plural slagunk slagjaink
2nd person plural slagotok slagjaitok
3rd person plural slagjuk slagjaik

References[edit]

  1. ^ slag in Tótfalusi, István. Magyar etimológiai nagyszótár (’Hungarian Comprehensive Dictionary of Etymology’). Budapest: Arcanum Adatbázis, 2001; Arcanum DVD Könyvtár →ISBN
  2. ^ slag in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slag n (genitive singular slags, nominative plural slög)

  1. A beat, stroke, blow (an act of hitting, beating, striking).
  2. (music) A beat.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse slag, and slagr (sense 4).

Noun[edit]

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga or slagene)

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. (medicine) A cardiac stroke.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces.
  4. A kind; sort.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse slag.

Noun[edit]

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga)

  1. a blow, a strike, a punch.
    Boksaren traff med eit hardt slag.The boxer landed a hard punch.
  2. a battle.
    Napoleon tapte slaget ved Waterloo.Napoleon lost the battle of Waterloo.
  3. (medicine) a stroke
    Tanta mi er på sjukehus etter å ha fått slag.My aunt is in hospital after having a stroke.
  4. (nautical) a bilge
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse slagr.

Noun[edit]

slag n (definite singular slaget, indefinite plural slag, definite plural slaga)

  1. A type, a kind, a sort.
    Eg likar alle slag blomar.I like all kinds of flowers.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse slag, from Proto-Germanic *slagiz (hit, blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slag n

  1. A hit; punch.
  2. A hit of a ball by a bat or a racket.
  3. A battle between two armies, navies or air forces
    slaget vid Lützenthe Battle of Lützen (1632)
    slaget om Storbritannienthe Battle of Britain
    Synonym: fältslag
  4. A stroke; the striking of a clock
    Klockan slog just tre slag.The clock just struck three strokes.
  5. stroke; the time when a clock strikes
    Han kom precis på slaget midnatt.He came on the stroke of midnight.
  6. (medicine) stroke; a loss of brain function arising when the blood supply to the brain is suddenly interrupted.
  7. A kind; sort.
    En fågel av ett ovanligt slagA bird of an unusual kind
    Synonym: sort
  8. A while; moment; a short period of time.
    Kom hit ett slag!Come here a minute!
    Synonym: stund
  9. A fold on the legs of a pair of trousers, where about an inch of the leg is folded upwards.
  10. A lapel

Declension[edit]

Declension of slag 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative slag slaget slag slagen
Genitive slags slagets slags slagens

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]