bat

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
A bat

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: băt, IPA(key): /bæt/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1[edit]

Dialectal variant (akin to dialectal Swedish natt-batta) of Middle English bakke, balke, from North Germanic. Compare Old Swedish natbakka, Old Danish nathbakkæ (literally night-flapper), Old Norse leðrblaka (literally leather-flapper).

Noun[edit]

bat (plural bats)

  1. Any of the flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, usually small and nocturnal, insectivorous or frugivorous.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
    • 2012, Suemedha Sood, (bbc.co.uk) Travelwise: Texas love bats [sic]
      As well as being worth millions of dollars to the Texan agriculture industry, these mammals are worth millions of dollars to the state’s tourism industry. Texas is home to the world’s largest known bat colony (in Comal County), and the world’s largest urban bat colony (in Austin). Bat watching is a common activity, with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offering more bat-viewing sites than anywhere else in the US.
  2. (derogatory) An old woman.
    • 2000, Bill Oddie, Gripping Yarns, page 196:
      "Isn't it lovely?" I smiled and thought: "Yes it is. It's also a Blackbird, you silly old bat!
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

A baseball player swinging a baseball bat to hit a baseball

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bat, batte, from Old English batt (bat, club, cudgel), probably of Celtic origin, compare Old Breton bath (club, cudgel) and modern Breton bazh (swagger stick).

Noun[edit]

bat (plural bats)

  1. A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.
  2. A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.
    You've been in for ages. Can I have a bat now?
  3. (two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.[1]
  4. (mining) Shale or bituminous shale.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Kirwan to this entry?)
  5. A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  6. A part of a brick with one whole end.
  7. A stroke; a sharp blow.
  8. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) A stroke of work.
  9. (informal) Rate of motion; speed.
    • 1842, Sporting Magazine (page 251)
      On starting, The Nun led at a very slow pace for a quarter of a mile, when the Shrigley colt made running at a good bat.
    • 1898, unknown author, Pall Mall Magazine
      a vast host of fowl [] making at full bat for the North Sea.
  10. (US, slang, dated) A spree; a jollification.
  11. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) Manner; rate; condition; state of health.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat (third-person singular simple present bats, present participle batting, simple past and past participle batted)

  1. (transitive) To hit with a bat or (figuratively) as if with a bat.
    He batted the ball away with a satisfying thwack.
    We batted a few ideas around.
  2. (intransitive) To take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.
  3. (intransitive) To strike or swipe as though with a bat.
    The cat batted at the toy.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language, second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242

Etymology 3[edit]

Possibly a variant of bate.

Verb[edit]

bat (third-person singular simple present bats, present participle batting, simple past and past participle batted)

  1. (transitive) To flutter
    bat one's eyelashes
  2. (US, Britain, dialect) To wink.
  3. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) To bate or flutter, as a hawk.
  4. (intransitive, usually with 'around' or 'about') To flit quickly from place to place.
    I've spent all week batting around the country.
Usage notes[edit]

Most commonly used in the phrase bat an eye, and variants thereof.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowed from French bât, from Old French bast, from Vulgar Latin *bastum, form of *bastāre (to carry), from Ancient Greek βαστάζω (bastázō, to lift, carry). Doublet of baton and baston.

Noun[edit]

bat (plural bats)

  1. (obsolete) A packsaddle.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat

  1. Dated form of baht (Thai currency).

Etymology 6[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat (plural bats)

  1. (Caribbean, MLE) Clipping of batty (fundament, tewel, butt).

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin battō, from Latin battuō. Compare Daco-Romanian bate, bat.

Verb[edit]

bat (third-person singular present indicative bati/bate, past participle bãtutã)

  1. I beat, hit, strike.
  2. I defeat.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a reduced form of Proto-Basque *bade (one, some), present also in bederatzi (nine) and bedera (same; everyone).[1][2][3] Compared by Eduardo Orduña and Joan Ferrer to Iberian ban (one).[4][5]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bat

  1. a, an, some
    musu bat
    a kiss

Numeral[edit]

Basque numbers (edit)
10
[a], [b] ←  0 1 2  → 
    Cardinal: bat
    Ordinal: lehen

bat

  1. one
    Sagar bat eta lau laranja.
    One apple and four oranges.

Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

bat

  1. (indefinite) some

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ bat” in Etymological Dictionary of Basque by R. L. Trask, sussex.ac.uk
  2. ^ Mitxelena, Koldo L. (1961) Fonética histórica vasca [Basque Historical Phonetics] (Obras completas de Luis Michelena; 1) (in Spanish), Diputación Foral de Guipuzkoa, published 1990, →ISBN, page 134
  3. ^ bat” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  4. ^ Orduña A., Eduardo (2011) , “Los numerales ibéricos y el protovasco [Iberian numerals and Proto-Basque]”, in Veleia[1] (in Spanish), volume 28, pages 125–139
  5. ^ Joan Ferrer i Jané, El sistema de numerales ibérico: avances en su conocimiento

Further reading[edit]

  • bat” in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia, euskaltzaindia.eus
  • Azkue, Resurrección María de (1905–1906) , “bat”, in Diccionario vasco-español-francés = Dictionnaire basque-espagnol-français [Basque-Spanish-French Dictionary] (in Spanish and French), volume 1, Bilbao, page 137

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of batre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of batre

Cebuano[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat

  1. a type of sea cucumber

Chinese[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of bat – see .
(This character, bat, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English bat.

Noun[edit]

bat n (singular definite battet, plural indefinite bat or bats)

  1. bat (a club for striking a ball)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. imperative of batte

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of battre

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. first-person singular preterite indicative of bitten
  2. third-person singular preterite indicative of bitten

Jamaican Creole[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbat/
  • Hyphenation: bat

Etymology 1[edit]

bat

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

bat (plural: bat dem, quantified: bat)

  1. moth (nocturnal insect)
    • 2003, Amber Wilson, Jamaica: The Land (in English), page 30:
      “Hundreds of species of butterflies and moths live in Jamaica. Jamaicans call large moths "bats." The black witch moth is known as "the duppy bat." A duppy is a spirit in Jamaican culture that sometimes causes mischief. Duppy bats have brown [...]”
    Duppy bat still a fly like hawk.
    Black witch moths are still flying around like hawks.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

bat

From English bat.

Noun[edit]

bat (plural: bat dem, quantified: bat)

  1. bat (instrument for hitting or striking)
    When yu get one lick from me wid di bat... yu wi know.
    If I hit you once with this bat, you'll understand.
Derived terms[edit]
  1. old bat

References[edit]

  • Richard Allsopp (main editor), Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, 2003 (reprint by The University of the West Indies Press, originally 1996 by Oxford University Press), ISBN 9789766401450 (originally ISBN-10: 976-640-145-4), page 83
  • bat – jamaicans.com Jamaican Patois dictionary

Jingpho[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Burmese ပတ် (pat)

Noun[edit]

bat

  1. week

References[edit]

  • Kurabe, Keita (2016-12-31) , “Phonology of Burmese loanwords in Jinghpaw”, in Kyoto University Linguistic Research[2], volume 35, DOI:10.14989/219015, ISSN 1349-7804, pages 91–128

Luo[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat (plural bede)

  1. arm

Middle Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *bath, from Proto-Germanic *baþą.

Noun[edit]

bat n

  1. bath
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
  • Dutch: bad
  • Limburgish: baad

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *bat, *bet, from Proto-Germanic *batiz.

Adverb[edit]

bat

  1. better; comparative degree of wel
    Synonym: beter
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative of bidden

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English batt, from Celtic; influenced by Old French batte.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat (plural battes or botten)

  1. A mace, bat, or morningstar (blunt weapon)
  2. (rare) A pole or stick used for other
  3. (rare, Late Middle English) A strike or hit from a weapon.
  4. (rare, Late Middle English) A clump of soft material.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of bot (boat)

Min Nan[edit]

For pronunciation and definitions of bat – see (“to know; to recognise; to be familiar with”).
(This character, bat, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *bait.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bāt m or f (nominative plural bātas)

  1. boat

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old English bāt and Middle English bot.

Noun[edit]

bat m (oblique plural batz, nominative singular batz, nominative plural bat)

  1. boat

References[edit]

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (bat)

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. inflection of is:
    1. third-person plural imperative
    2. third-person plural present subjunctive

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bat bat
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbat
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
bat

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *batъ.

Noun[edit]

bat m inan (diminutive bacik)

  1. whip (rod)
    Synonym: bicz
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat m inan

  1. bateau (type of boat)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Thai บาท (bàat).

Noun[edit]

bat m inan

  1. baht (official currency of Thailand)

Further reading[edit]

  • bat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bate
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of bate
  3. third-person plural present indicative of bate

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *batъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȁt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̏т)

  1. mallet
  2. helve hammer
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish باصدی(bastı), from باصمق(basmak).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑т)

  1. The tramp of heavy footsteps, as in a military march
    • 1939, Čedomir Minderović, Crven je istok i zapad:
      Napred, sve bliže i bliže, / Čuje se koraka bat. / Glas milijona se diže: / Dole fašizam i rat!
      Forward, ever closer and closer, / the tramp of footsteps is heard. / The voice of millions is raised: / Down with fascism and war!
  2. (rare) The tramp of horses’ hooves
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bȃt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̑т)

  1. Alternative form of bȁht
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • bat” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • bat” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • bat” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bat.

Noun[edit]

bat m (plural bats)

  1. (baseball) bat (act of batting)
  2. Misspelling of baht.

Turkish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. sink (imperative)

Tzotzil[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Zinacantán) IPA(key): /ɓätʰ/

Verb[edit]

bat

  1. (intransitive) to go

References[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat f

  1. excrement
  2. dirt, uncleanliness

Noun[edit]

bat m (definite batn, plural baat)

  1. Alternative spelling of båt

Yola[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat

  1. Alternative form of bath

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN

Yucatec Maya[edit]

Noun[edit]

bat (plural batoʼob)

  1. hail, hailstone

Zhuang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Chinese (MC puɑt̚).

Noun[edit]

bat (Sawndip forms or 𥐙 or or or , old orthography bat)

  1. basin; bowl
    Synonym: angq (dialectal)
Derived terms[edit]

Classifier[edit]

bat (old orthography bat)

  1. basin of; bowl of

Etymology 2[edit]

From Chinese (MC pˠɛt̚, “eight”). Doublet of bet.

Numeral[edit]

bat (old orthography bat)

  1. eight (used in compounds)
    Synonym: bet