bede

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See also: bédé, bêdê, bědě, and będę

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bēde (prayer, request, supplication, order, command, rosary, bead), from Old English gebed (prayer, petition, supplication, religious service, an ordinance), from Proto-Germanic *bedą (prayer, entreaty). Cognate with Dutch gebed and bede, German Gebet.

Noun[edit]

bede (plural bedes or beden)

  1. prayer, request, supplication
    • 1875 March, in Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 15 Number 87:
      Thus originated the alms-(or bede-) houses so frequently met with in the retired villages of England.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night:
      By Allah thy bede is good indeed and right is thy rede!
    • 2008, Time to Ditch St. George:
      [] because miracles had frequently been done at his burial-place, even at the bede-house where he was buried.
    • 2011, Where Did Beaded Flowers Come From?:
      Because of the length of the original rosary, it became customary to pay someone, usually a resident of an almshouse, to recite the prayers. These people were referred to as bede women or men, and it was they who made the first bead flowers.
  2. order, command
  3. rosary

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bēden (to pray, offer, proffer, request, demand, order, command, forbid; proclaim, declare; present, counsel, advise, exhort), from Old English bēodan (to command, decree, summon, banish, declare, inform, announce, proclaim; threaten, offer, proffer, give, grant, surrender), from Proto-Germanic *beudaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewdʰ-. Germanic cognates include Old Frisian biada, Old Saxon biodan (Low German beden), Dutch bieden, Old High German biotan (German bieten), Old Norse bjóða (Swedish bjuda (command, show)), Gothic 𐌰𐌽𐌰𐌱𐌹𐌿𐌳𐌰𐌽 (anabiudan). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek πευθεσθαι (peuthesthai, ask for), Sanskrit बोधयित (bodhayita, wake), Old Church Slavonic бъдѣти (bŭděti) (Russian будить (buditʹ, wake)), Lithuanian budeti (awake). See also bid.

Verb[edit]

bede (third-person singular simple present bedes, present participle beding, simple past bade, past participle bode or boden)

  1. pray, offer, proffer
    • 1500, The Towneley Plays:
      Sir, a bargan bede I you.
  2. request, demand, order, command, forbid
  3. proclaim, declare
  4. present, counsel, advise, rede, exhort
    • 1450, Merlin:
      They of londone [] boden hem to ben lyht of herte.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Unknown?

Noun[edit]

bede (plural bedes)

  1. (mining) A kind of pickaxe.
References[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for bede in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

  • Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, 1911
  • Middle English Dictionary

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beːðə/, [ˈb̥eðð̩]

Noun[edit]

bede c (singular definite beden, plural indefinite beder)

  1. beet (the root plant Beta vulgaris)
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Either the Danish noun derives from a now-archaic verb bede (to castrate, geld, wether), which derives from Middle Low German böten, or the noun derives from a Middle Low German noun bete.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beːðə/, [ˈb̥eðð̩]

Noun[edit]

bede c (singular definite beden, plural indefinite beder)

  1. wether (a castrated ram)
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse biðja, from Proto-Germanic *bidjaną (to ask). Cognate with Swedish be, bedja, English bid, Dutch bidden, and German bitten. The Germanic verb probably goes back to Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰedʰ-, cf. Polish żądać (to demand) and Ancient Greek θέσσασθαι (théssasthai, to pray)

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bede (past tense bad, past participle bedt)

  1. (transitive) to ask, request (to demand something from someone, with the person as an object and with the preposition om + the thing asked for)
  2. (transitive) to beg, entreat, implore (to plead to someone about something, with the person as an object and with the preposition om + the thing asked for)
  3. (intransitive) to pray (to address a divinity, with the preposition til + the addressed divinity)
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse beita (to let graze, rest), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną, cognate with Norwegian beite (English bait is borrowed from Old Norse). A causative of the verb *bītaną (to bite) (cf. Danish bide).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beːðə/, [ˈb̥eðð̩]

Verb[edit]

bede (past tense bedede, past participle bedet)

  1. (dated) to make a halt, take a rest
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /beːðə/, [ˈb̥eðð̩]

Noun[edit]

bede n pl

  1. indefinite plural of bed

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch bede, from Old Dutch beda.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeː.də/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: be‧de
  • Rhymes: -eːdə

Noun[edit]

bede f (plural beden or bedes, diminutive bedetje n)

  1. plea
  2. (archaic) a prayer

Derived terms[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch beda, from Proto-Germanic *bedō.

Noun[edit]

bēde f

  1. prayer
  2. plea, request
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]
  • Dutch: bede

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

bêde

  1. (Flemish) Alternative form of beide
Inflection[edit]

This determiner needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse biðja, compare with Danish bede

Verb[edit]

bede (imperative bed, present tense beder, passive bedes, simple past bad, past participle bedt, present participle bedende)

  1. (archaic) to ask; request
  2. to pray

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse biðja

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bede (present tense bed, past tense bad, past participle bede or bedd or bedt, present participle bedande, imperative bed)

  1. to ask; request
  2. to pray

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *bai-, whence also Old Norse báðir.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

bēde

  1. both

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High-German Primer with Grammar, Notes and Glossary, Oxford, 1888, p. 143.

Old Irish[edit]

Verb[edit]

bede

  1. second-person plural present subjunctive of is

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German beten. Related to English bead.

Verb[edit]

bede

  1. to pray