bide

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: bidé, bidè, bidê, bidę, and bídě

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English biden, from Old English bīdan (to stay, continue, live, remain, delay; wait for, await, expect; endure, experience, find; attain, obtain; own), from Proto-West Germanic *bīdan (to wait), from Proto-Germanic *bīdaną (to wait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéydʰeti, from *bʰeydʰ- (to command, persuade, compel, trust). Latinate cognates (via PIE) include faith and fidelity.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bide (third-person singular simple present bides, present participle biding, simple past bode or bided, past participle bided or bidden)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To bear; to endure; to tolerate.
    • c. 1570, Anonymous, Sir Clyomon and Sir Clamydes
      And doubting naught right courteous all, in your accustomed wont: And gentle ears, our author he is prest to bide the brunt
  2. (transitive, archaic) To face with resistance; to encounter; to withstand.
    • c. 1587–1588, [Christopher Marlowe], Tamburlaine the Great. [] The First Part [], part 1, 2nd edition, London: [] [R. Robinson for] Richard Iones, [], published 1592, OCLC 932920499; reprinted as Tamburlaine the Great (A Scolar Press Facsimile), Menston, Yorkshire; London: Scolar Press, 1973, →ISBN, Act I, scene ii:
      Tech[elles]. I heare them come, ſhall wee encounter them? / Tam[burlaine]. Keep all your ſtandings, and not ſtir a foot, / Myſelfe will bide the danger of the brunt.
  3. (intransitive, archaic or dialectal) To dwell or reside in a location; to abide.
  4. (intransitive, archaic or dialectal) To wait; to be in expectation; to stay; to remain.
  5. (transitive, archaic) To wait for; to await.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The verb has been replaced by abide in Standard English for almost all its uses, and is now rarely found outside the expression bide one's time.

Quotations[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bide/, [bi.ð̞e̞]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

bide inan

  1. path, track, way
  2. way, manner, method, procedure
  3. journey
  4. line
Declension[edit]
Declension of bide (inanimate, ending in vowel)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive bide bidea bideak
ergative bidek bideak bideek
dative bideri bideari bideei
genitive bideren bidearen bideen
comitative biderekin bidearekin bideekin
causative biderengatik bidearengatik bideengatik
benefactive biderentzat bidearentzat bideentzat
instrumental bidez bideaz bideez
inessive bidetan bidean bideetan
locative bidetako bideko bideetako
allative bidetara bidera bideetara
terminative bidetaraino bideraino bideetaraino
directive bidetarantz biderantz bideetarantz
destinative bidetarako biderako bideetarako
ablative bidetatik bidetik bideetatik
partitive biderik
prolative bidetzat
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Particle[edit]

bide

  1. apparently, seemingly
    Galdu bide gara.It seems like we're lost.

Further reading[edit]

  • "bide" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • bide” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish bitæ, from Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, cognate with English bite, German bissen, Dutch bijten. The Germanic verb goes back to Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split), cf. Latin findō (to cleave), fissiō (breaking up) (hence fission).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bide (imperative bid, infinitive at bide, present tense bider, past tense bed, perfect tense har bidt)

  1. bite (to cut off a piece by clamping the teeth)

Inflection[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From bidon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bide m (plural bides)

  1. fiasco, flop
  2. (colloquial) paunch, belly
  3. (uncountable) Something fake

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

bide

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ビデ

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

bide n (definite singular bideet, indefinite plural bide or bideer, definite plural bidea or bideene)

  1. alternative spelling of bidé

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bíða.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bide (present tense bid, past tense beid, supine bide, past participle biden, present participle bidande, imperative bid)

  1. (intransitive) to exist
    Synonym: vere til

Etymology 2[edit]

From French.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bide n (definite singular bideet, indefinite plural bide, definite plural bidea)

  1. alternative spelling of bidé

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English bīdan, from Proto-Germanic.

Verb[edit]

bide

  1. to dwell, to live
    Tae bide somewhaur: to dwell somewhere.
    Tae bide: to dwell.
    Whaur dae ye bide?: where do you live?
  2. to stay, to remain
    "Bide and fecht!" (traditional Scots phrase meaning "Stay and fight!")

Derived terms[edit]

bydand


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French bidet.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bǐdeː/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧de

Noun[edit]

bìdē m (Cyrillic spelling бѝде̄)

  1. bidet

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • bide” in Hrvatski jezični portal