bade

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Bade, badé, and både

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bæd/, /beɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd, -eɪd

Verb[edit]

bade

  1. simple past tense of bid
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 22, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      Pancho, the major-domo, came up to say that Colonel Morales was waiting below. Appleby bade him bring out cigars and wine, and rose from his seat when Morales came in.

Usage notes[edit]

The inflected form bade, like the form bidden, is archaic. It remains in marginal use, particularly regarding greetings as in “bade farewell”, but uninflected bid is significantly more common.[1]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bid, bade, bidden”, Grammarist

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse baða, baðask, from Proto-Germanic *baþōną (to bathe), cognate with English bathe and German baden.

Verb[edit]

bade (imperative bad, infinitive at bade, present tense bader, past tense badede, perfect tense har badet)

  1. (intransitive) to bathe, take a bath, take a swim
  2. (transitive) to bath

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

bade n

  1. indefinite plural of bad

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bade

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of bidden
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of baden

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bade

  1. inflection of baden:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the noun bad.

Verb[edit]

bade (imperative bad, present tense bader, passive bades, simple past and past participle bada or badet, present participle badende)

  1. to bathe
  2. to bath (British; e.g. bath a baby)
  3. to swim, have a swim

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. Coincides with Bulgarian бате (bate), бачо (bačo), Serbo-Croatian bato, bača, Hungarian bátya, which could have been borrowed from Romanian. The term might belong to a substratum word from an Indo-European root for father. Compare baci and Russian батюшка (batjuška).

A relation to the dialectal words *bade ("old") and *bad ("to get old") in Lazio, doesn't appear to be coincidental.[1]

Noun[edit]

bade m (uncountable)

  1. (archaic, popular) older brother
  2. (archaic, popular) older man
  3. (humorous, slightly pejorative) a hillbilly, a yokel, a bumpkin; a poorly educated man from the countryside
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ bade in DEX online - Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Salar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ba (kiss). (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Ili, Samuyuzi, Yining, Xinjiang) IPA(key): [paːdæ]

Verb[edit]

bade

  1. to kiss
    Synonyms: modı, mudı, pose qıl, söy

References[edit]

  • 马伟 (Ma Wei), 朝克 (Chao Ke) (2016), “bade”, in 濒危语言——撒拉语研究 [Endangered Languages ​​- Salar Language Studies], 青海 (Qinghai): 国家社会科学基金项目 (National Social Science Foundation Project), page 283
  • Yakup, Abdurishid (2002), “bade”, in An Ili Salar Vocabulary: Introduction and a Provisional Salar-English Lexicon, Tokyo: University of Tokyo, →ISBN, page 52-53

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Classical Persian باده(bāda, wine).

Noun[edit]

bade

  1. (dated) wine, drink (served alcoholic beverage)