bato

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Awabakal[edit]

Noun[edit]

bato

  1. water
    • 1892, An Australian Language as Spoken by the Awabakal[1]:
      Bato, m., water

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

bato

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of batre

Cebuano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Ilocano bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu, Tagalog bato).

Noun[edit]

bato

  1. A stone.
  2. A pebble, a rock, a boulder.
  3. A gem.
  4. A calculus in the kidney; kidney stone.
  5. (bingo) A token, a pebble or seed used to mark a bingo card.

Verb[edit]

bato

  1. To stone, to throw stones at someone or something.
  2. To throw something at someone or something.
  3. To turn into stone.
  4. To harden like a rock.

Adjective[edit]

bato

  1. Made or built of stone.
  2. Made of concrete building material.
  3. stonehard
  4. rocklike, stonelike

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbato/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧to

Noun[edit]

bato ‎(accusative singular baton, plural batoj, accusative plural batojn)

  1. blow, hit, strike, stroke (physical attack, punch)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Hiligaynon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Ilocano bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu, Tagalog bato).

Noun[edit]

bató

  1. rock, stone, cobble

Verb[edit]

bató

  1. to stone

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

báto

  1. a complete thing, the whole
  2. a piece of anything that is round or cubic in shape

Verb[edit]

bátò

  1. to resist or oppose
  2. to rise up
  3. to backtalk

Ido[edit]

Noun[edit]

bato (plural bati)

  1. beating

Derived terms[edit]


Ilocano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu, Tagalog bato).

Noun[edit]

bato

  1. rock, stone, cobble

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

batō

  1. dative singular of batus
  2. ablative singular of batus

Lingala[edit]

Noun[edit]

bato class 2

  1. plural of mota

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

bato

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bater

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

bato m ‎(plural batos)

  1. (dated) dork, dimwit
  2. (Latin America, informal) young man, youth
  3. (Mexico, colloquial) chump, punk
  4. (Mexico, colloquial) dude, guy, buddy
Synonyms[edit]
  • (a young man)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish Romani bato.

Noun[edit]

bato m ‎(plural batos)

  1. (Spain, slang) father
Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

bato

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of batir.

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, from Proto-Austronesian (compare Cebuano bato, Fijian vatu, Hawaiian haku, Hiligaynon bato, Ilocano bato, Indonesian batu, Kapampangan batu, Malagasy vato, Malay batu, Maori whatu, Sundanese batu).

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

bato

  1. stone
  2. kidney
  3. gallstone
  4. gem; jewel
  5. knot in wood
  6. (idiomatic, colloquial) A bored person.

Verb[edit]

bato

  1. (idiomatic, colloquial) To be bored.
    Nababato na ako sa kahihintay.
    I am almost turning into stone from all the waiting.

Pronunciation 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

bato

  1. chief piece in a game of native quoits called "tangga"