chip

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See also: CHIP, ChIP, Chip, CHiP, and chíp

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English chip, chippe, from Old English ċipp(chip; small piece of wood), from *ċippian ("to cut; hew"; attested in forċippian(to cut off)), from Proto-Germanic *kipp-(to cut; carve; hack; chop), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵey-(to split; divide; germinate; sprout). Related to Dutch kip, keep(notch; nick; score), Dutch kippen(to hatch), German Low German kippen(to cut; clip; trim; shorten), German kipfen(to chop off the tip; snip), Old Swedish kippa(to chop). Compare also chop.

The formally similar Old English ċipp, ċypp, ċyp(a beam; log; stock; post), from Proto-Germanic *kippaz(log; beam) ( = Old Saxon kip(post) = Old High German kipfa, chipfa(axle, stave) = Old Norse keppr(cudgel, club)), from Latin cippus(stake; pale; post), is a different, unrelated word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chip ‎(plural chips)

A computer chip.
A plate of potato chips (UK).
A pile of potato chips (US).
  1. A small piece broken from a larger piece of solid material.
  2. A damaged area of a surface where a small piece has been broken off.
    This cup has a chip in it.
  3. (games, gambling) A token used in place of cash.
    • 2002, Albert H. Moorehead, Hoyle′s Rules of Games, page 46,
      If the second player does raise three chips, and all the other players drop, the player who opened may stay in by putting three more chips in the pot, for then he will have put in precisely as many chips as the second player.
  4. (electronics) A circuit fabricated in one piece on a small, thin substrate.
    • 1986 September 1, Tom Moran, Lisa L. Spiegelman, New Chip Said to Contain Seven PC AT Chip Functions, InfoWorld, page 5,
      But sources close to the company said the chip contains two direct memory access controllers, two interrupt controllers, a timer, a memory mapper from Texas Instruments, and a Motorola Inc. real-time clock.
  5. (electronics) A hybrid device mounted in a substrate, containing electronic circuitry and miniaturised mechanical, chemical and/or biochemical devices.
    • 2002, Koji Ikuta, Atsushi Takahashi, Kota Ikeda, Shoji Maruo, User-Assembly Fully Integrated Micro Chemical Laboratory Using Biochemical IC Chips for Wearable/Implantable Applications, Yoshinobu Baba, Shuichi Shoji, Albert van den Berg (editors), Micro Total Analysis Systems 2002: Proceedings of the μTAS 2002 Symposium, Volume 1, page 38,
      Fig. 4(a) shows a schematic design of the micropump chip.
    • 2007, Elisabeth S. Papazoglou, Aravind Parthasarathy, Bionanotechnology, page 6,
      Fig. 0.3 is an image of the front and back views of a drug delivery microchip made of silicon and painted with gold, with a U.S. dime (10 cents). The chip in the picture consists of 34 nano-sized wells each of which is capable of housing 24 nl (nano liters) of drug. It is possible to make at least 400 wells or even 1000 or more in these chips which are very inexpensive, costing less tham $20 [22, 23].
  6. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, chiefly in the plural) A fried strip of potato of square or rectangular cross-section; a french fry.
    Do you want sauce or mayonnaise on your chips?
  7. (US, Australia and New Zealand, chiefly in the plural) A thin, crisp, fried slice of potato, or sometimes another vegetable.
    they made their own potato chips from scratch, he ate a tortilla chip, served with a side of apple chips
  8. (sports) A shot during which the ball travels more predominantly upwards than in a regular shot, as to clear an obstacle.
    • 2011 September 28, Tom Rostance, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Olympiakos”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Oxlade-Chamberlain saw his attempted chip well blocked by goalkeeper Costanzo at the start of the second half.
  9. (curling) A takeout that hits a rock at an angle.
  10. A dried piece of dung used as fuel.
  11. (New Zealand, northern) A receptacle, usually for strawberries or other fruit.
  12. (cooking) A small, near-conical piece of food added in baking.
    chocolate chip
  13. A small rectangle of colour printed on coated paper for colour selection and matching. A virtual equivalent in software applications.
  14. (nautical) The triangular piece of wood attached to the log line.
  15. (historical) Wood or Cuban palm leaf split into slips, or straw plaited in a special manner, for making hats or bonnets.
  16. (archaic, derogatory) Anything dried up, withered, or without flavour.
  17. (golf) A low shot that travels further along the ground than it does in the air.

Usage notes[edit]

In New Zealand, where the term chip(s) can refer to either french fried potatoes or deep-fried potato slices, the dishes are distinguished as "hot chips" (french fried potatoes) or "cold chips" (deep-fried potato slices) when clarity is needed.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

chip ‎(third-person singular simple present chips, present participle chipping, simple past and past participle chipped)

  1. (transitive) To break into small pieces.
    The workers chipped the dead branches into mulch.
    • 2015 February 7, Val Bourne, “The quiet man of the world of snowdrops”, in The Daily Telegraph (London), page G8:
      Once it [a snowdrop variety] became established, some bulbs were lifted and passed on to be chipped (i.e. cut into small pieces and grown on).
  2. (transitive) To break small pieces from.
    Be careful not to chip the paint.
  3. (transitive, sports) To play a shot hitting the ball predominately upwards rather than forwards.
  4. (transitive, sports) In association football, specifically, to play a shot on goal by kicking the ball in an arc, over the goalkeeper's reach. (Such shots are often played in a mostly horizontal direction, particularly when taken from distance). In this usage, the opposing goalkeeper is often the direct object of the verb.
    • 2014, Paul Doyle, "Southampton hammer eight past hapless Sunderland in barmy encounter", The Guardian, 18 October 2014:
      Koeman identified Southampton’s third as their finest goal of the game. Jack Cork, the most underrated player at a much-lauded club, swept the ball out wide to Tadic, who waited for Cork to run to the back post before chipping the ball across to him to slam in a deserved goal from close range, despite an attempted block by Vito Mannone.
    • 2016, Andy Edwards, "VIDEO: San Jose’s Quincy Amarikwa chips, goes upper-90 from 35 yards out", NBCSports.com, 13 March 2016:
      Typically when someone scores a stunning goal this early in the season — it’s only Week 2 — it gets forgotten, or at the very least lost in the shuffle after eight more months of worthy GOTY candidates. Not this year, though, because no one is forgetting Amarikwa chipping Adam Kwarasey from 35 yards out and burying the ball in the top corner.
  5. (transitive, automotive) to upgrade an engine management system, usually to increase power.
  6. (intransitive) To become chipped.
    This varnish chips easily.
  7. (intransitive, card games, often with "in") To ante (up).
  8. (transitive, informal) To fit (an animal) with a microchip.
  9. (Britain, transitive, often with "in") to contribute.
    Everyone needs to chip in £1 for George's leaving collection

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Hungarian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English chip.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chip ‎(plural chipek)

  1. (electronics) chip (a circuit fabricated in one piece on a small, thin substrate)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative chip chipek
accusative chipet chipeket
dative chipnek chipeknek
instrumental chippel chipekkel
causal-final chipért chipekért
translative chippé chipekké
terminative chipig chipekig
essive-formal chipként chipekként
essive-modal
inessive chipben chipekben
superessive chipen chipeken
adessive chipnél chipeknél
illative chipbe chipekbe
sublative chipre chipekre
allative chiphez chipekhez
elative chipből chipekből
delative chipről chipekről
ablative chiptől chipektől
Possessive forms of chip
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. chipem chipjeim
2nd person sing. chiped chipjeid
3rd person sing. chipje chipjei
1st person plural chipünk chipjeink
2nd person plural chipetek chipjeitek
3rd person plural chipjük chipjeik

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chip m

  1. Lenited form of cip.

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cip chip gcip
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English chip.

Noun[edit]

chip m ‎(invariable)

  1. chip (small electronic component)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hungarian kép(image).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

chip n ‎(plural chipuri)

  1. face, likeness
  2. picture, image

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English chip.

Noun[edit]

chip m ‎(plural chips)

  1. chip (circuit)