image

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See also: Image and imagé

English[edit]

An image that represents image files

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin imāgō (a copy, likeness, image), from *im, root of imitari (to copy, imitate); see imitate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

image (plural images)

  1. An optical or other representation of a real object; a graphic; a picture.
    The Bible forbids the worship of graven images.
    • 2012 March 1, Brian Hayes, “Pixels or Perish”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 106:
      Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.
  2. A mental picture of something not real or not present.
    • 2013 August 3, “Revenge of the nerds”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Think of banking today and the image is of grey-suited men in towering skyscrapers. Its future, however, is being shaped in converted warehouses and funky offices in San Francisco, New York and London, where bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.
  3. (computing) A file that contains all information needed to produce a live working copy. (See disk image, executable image and image copy.)
    Most game console emulators do not come with any ROM images for copyright reasons.
  4. A characteristic of a person, group or company etc., style, manner of dress, how one is, or wishes to be, perceived by others.
  5. (mathematics) Something mapped to by a function.
    The number 6 is the image of 3 under f that is defined as f(x) = 2*x.
  6. (mathematics) The subset of a codomain comprising those elements that are images of something.
    The image of this step function is the set of integers.
  7. (obsolete) Show; appearance; cast.
    • Dryden
      The face of things a frightful image bears.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (representation): picture
  • (mental picture): idea
  • (something mapped to): value
  • (subset of the codomain): range

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Verb[edit]

image (third-person singular simple present images, present participle imaging, simple past and past participle imaged)

  1. (transitive) To represent by an image or symbol; to portray.
    • 1718, Alexander Pope, The Iliad of Homer, London: Bernard Lintot, Volume IV, Observations on the Fifteenth Book, Note 14 on verse 252, p. 215,[2]
      This Representation of the Terrors which must have attended the Conflict of two such mighty Powers as Jupiter and Neptune, whereby the Elements had been mix’d in Confusion, and the whole Frame of Nature endangered, is imaged in these few Lines with a Nobleness suitable to the Occasion.
    • 1791, James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, London: Charles Dilly, Volume I, p. 393,[3]
      [] his behaviour was, as I had imaged to myself, solemnly devout.
    • 1817, Jane Austen, Persuasion, Chapter 11,[4]
      [] he repeated, with such tremulous feeling, the various lines which imaged a broken heart, or a mind destroyed by wretchedness, and looked so entirely as if he meant to be understood, that she ventured to hope he did not always read only poetry, and to say, that she thought it was the misfortune of poetry to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely []
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Boston: Ticknor, Reed & Fields, Chapter 16, p. 222,[5]
      [The road] straggled onward into the mystery of a primeval forest. This hemmed it in so narrowly, and stood so black and dense on either side, and disclosed such imperfect glimpses of the sky above, that, to Hester’s mind, it imaged not amiss the moral wilderness in which she had so long been wandering.
  2. (transitive) To reflect, mirror.
    • 1829, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, “Timbuctoo” in The Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson, London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906, Volume I, p. 10,[6]
      See’st thou yon river, whose translucent wave,
      Forth issuing from the darkness, windeth through
      The argent streets o’ th’ City, imaging
      The soft inversion of her tremulous Domes,
    • 1841, Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop, London: Chapman & Hall, Chapter 71, p. 210,[7]
      Sorrow was dead indeed in her, but peace and perfect happiness were born; imaged in her tranquil beauty and profound repose.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, London: Chapman & Hall, Book 2, Chapter 2, “St. Edmundsbury,” p. 43,[8]
      [] we look into a pair of eyes deep as our own, imaging our own, but all unconscious of us; to whom we, for the time, are become as spirits and invisible!
  3. (transitive) To create an image of.
    • 2013 July-August, Fenella Saunders, “Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture”, in American Scientist:
      The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.
  4. (transitive, computing) To create a complete backup copy of a file system or other entity.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English image

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ima‧ge

Noun[edit]

image n (plural images)

  1. image

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin imago (a copy, likeness, image).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

image f (plural images)

  1. picture, image
  2. (TV, film) frame

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

image

  1. first-person singular present indicative of imager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of imager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of imager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of imager
  5. second-person singular imperative of imager

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English image

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

image m, n

  1. image (how one wishes to be perceived by others)

Inflection[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English image

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

image m, n

  1. image (how one wishes to be perceived by others)

Inflection[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • himage
  • imagene (La Vie de Saint Alexis, 11th century manuscripts)
  • imagine (La Vie de Saint Alexis, 11th century manuscripts)

Etymology[edit]

Latin imāgō.

Noun[edit]

image f (oblique plural images, nominative singular image, nominative plural images)

  1. sight (something which one sees)
  2. image (pictorial representation)
  3. image (mental or imagined representation)
  4. image (likeness)
  5. statue (of a person)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (image, supplement)