batre

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: batré

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin battere, variant of Latin battuere (to beat, hit), present active infinitive of battuō, of Celtic/Gaulish origin. Compare Occitan batre or French battre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

batre (first-person singular present bato, past participle batut)

  1. (transitive) to beat
  2. (transitive) to thresh
  3. (transitive) to hammer, to pound
  4. (transitive) to batter, beat up, to plunder
  5. (transitive, intransitive, baseball) to bat
  6. (intransitive) to beat
  7. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to fight

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan batre, from Late Latin battere, variant of Latin battuere (to beat, hit), present active infinitive of battuō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

batre

  1. to hit; to strike

Conjugation[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin battere, variant of Latin battuere (to beat, hit), present active infinitive of battuō.

Verb[edit]

batre

  1. to beat; to hit; to strike

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle French: battre
  • Norman: battre
  • Walloon: bate