aver

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See also: avêr, avër, and a ver

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French avérer, from Late Latin *advērāre, from ad + vērus (true).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver (third-person singular simple present avers, present participle averring, simple past and past participle averred)

  1. To assert the truth of, to affirm with confidence; to declare in a positive manner.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras, part 1, canto 2:
      Chiron, the four-legg'd bard, had both \ A beard and tail of his own growth; \ And yet by authors 'tis averr'd, \ He made use only of his beard.
    • 1819 CE, Percy Shelley, Peter Bell the Third:
      The Devil, I safely can aver, / Has neither hoof, nor tail, nor sting.
    • 1939, Noel Langley; Florence Ryerson; Edgar Allan Woolf, The Wizard of Oz, MGM/Warner Home Video:
      As Coroner, I must aver, I thoroughly examined her.
    • 1997, Frederic W.; Roberta B. Case, Trilliums, →ISBN:
      Small (1933) avers T. simile to be deliciously fragrant, a quality we have not noticed in our plants.
    • 2019 April 14, Alex McLevy, “Winter is here on Game Of Thrones' final season premiere (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      when Yara tells him he picked the losing side, he avers that he might just as soon head back to the Iron Islands—“But first, I’m gonna fuck the queen”
  2. (law) To prove or justify a plea.
    • 2007 July 26, European Court of Human Rights, Peev. v. Bulgaria[2], number 64209/01, marginal 19:
      In the meantime, on 5 June 2000, the applicant had brought a civil action against the Prosecutor's Office. He alleged that the termination of his contract had been unlawful and sought reinstatement and compensation for loss of salary. He averred, inter alia, that the climate in the Supreme Cassation Prosecutor's Office had deteriorated as a result of the actions of the Chief Prosecutor.
  3. (obsolete) To avouch, prove, or verify; to offer to verify.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Old French aveir (French avoir), substantive use of the verb, from Latin habeō (to have, hold, keep). See cattle and chattel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aver (plural avers)

  1. (obsolete) Possessions, property, belongings, wealth.

Etymology 3[edit]

Related to Late Latin averia (cattle). Similarly, in Hebrew אַבִּיר(abír).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

aver (plural avers)

  1. (dialectal) A work-horse, working ox, or other beast of burden.

Anagrams[edit]


Corsican[edit]

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Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Alternative form of avè

Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • haver (obsolete spelling)

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Apocopic form of avere

Anagrams[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish aver, from Latin habeō (hold, have).

Verb[edit]

aver (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling אביר‎)

  1. to have

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French aveir, from Latin habeō (have, hold, possess).

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. (Jersey, alternative form in Guernsey) to have

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan aver, haver, from Latin habeō (to have, hold, keep).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have; to possess
    Synonym: possedir
  2. (auxiliary) to have

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Alternative form of avoir

Noun[edit]

aver m (oblique plural avers, nominative singular avers, nominative plural aver)

  1. Alternative form of avoir
    • c. 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 216 (of the Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, line 2832:
      de ses avers li volt mustrer.
      he wants to show his possessions to her.

Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habeō (to have, hold, keep).

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have; to possess
    • circa 1185, Guerau de Cabrera, Ensenhamen:
      Jes gran saber
      no potz aver,
      si fors non eis de ta reion.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: haver
  • Occitan: aver

Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habeō (to have, hold, keep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. to have
    Pedro ha dos fijas.
    Pedro has two daughters.

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver (first-person singular present indicative ei, past participle avido)

  1. Obsolete spelling of haver

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Noun[edit]

aver m (plural averes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of haver

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. Obsolete spelling of haber

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin habeō.

Verb[edit]

aver

  1. (transitive) to have
  2. (transitive) to possess

Conjugation[edit]

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.