rave

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French raver, variant of resver, of uncertain origin.

Noun[edit]

rave (plural raves)

  1. An enthusiastic review (such as of a play).
  2. An all-night dance party filled with electronic dance music (techno, trance, drum and bass etc.) and possibly drug use.
  3. (uncountable) The genre of electronic dance music associated with rave parties.
    • 2009, Chrysalis Experiential Academy, Mind Harvesting (page 109)
      Maybe I wear baggies / And white socks with flip-flops / Maybe I don't like listening to rave / And I'm not on the social mountaintops
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rave (third-person singular simple present raves, present participle raving, simple past and past participle raved)

  1. To wander in mind or intellect; to be delirious; to talk or act irrationally; to be wild, furious, or raging.
    • Addison
      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast?
    • Macaulay
      The mingled torrent of redcoats and tartans went raving down the valley to the gorge of Killiecrankie.
  2. To speak or write wildly or incoherently.
    • 1748, David Hume, Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, Section 3. § 5.
      A production without design would resemble more the ravings of a madman, than the sober efforts of genius and learning.
  3. To talk with unreasonable enthusiasm or excessive passion or excitement; followed by about, of, or (formerly) on.
    He raved about her beauty.
    • Byron
      The hallowed scene / Which others rave on, though they know it not.
  4. (obsolete) To rush wildly or furiously.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  5. To attend a rave (dance party).
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

English dialect raves, or rathes (a frame laid on a wagon, for carrying hay, etc.).

Noun[edit]

rave (plural raves)

  1. One of the upper side pieces of the frame of a wagon body or a sleigh.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rāpum.

Noun[edit]

rave m (plural raves)

  1. radish

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /raːvə/, [ˈʁɑːwə]

Verb[edit]

rave (imperative rav, infinitive at rave, present tense raver, past tense ravede, past participle har ravet)

  1. reel
  2. stagger, totter, lurch

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

rave

  1. first-person singular present indicative of raven
  2. singular present subjunctive of raven
  3. imperative of raven

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin rapa, plural of rāpum, used instead as a feminine singular. Compare Italian rapa.

Noun[edit]

rave m (plural raves)

  1. beet, turnip

Etymology 2[edit]

From English

Noun[edit]

rave m (plural raves)

  1. rave party

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rāve

  1. vocative masculine singular of rāvus

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rave f

  1. plural form of rava