rive

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English riven (to rive), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse rīfa (to rend, tear apart), from Proto-Germanic *rīfaną (to tear, scratch), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)reip- (to crumble, tear). Cognate with Danish rive (to tear), Old Frisian rīva (to tear), Old English ārǣfan (to let loose, unwrap), Old Norse ript (rift, breach of contract), Norwegian rive (to tear) and Albanian rrip (belt, rope). More at rift.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rive (third-person singular simple present rives, present participle riving, simple past rived or rove, past participle rived or riven)

  1. (transitive, archaic except in past participle) To tear apart by force; to split; to cleave.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds / Have rived the knotty oaks []
  2. (transitive, archaic) To pierce or cleave with a weapon.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book II, chapter vj:
      And therwith she toke the swerd from her loue that lay ded and fylle to the ground in a swowne / And whan she aroos she made grete dole out of mesure / the whiche sorowe greued Balyn passyngly sore / and he wente vnto her for to haue taken the swerd oute of her hād but [] sodenly she sette the pomell to the ground / and rofe her self thorow the body
  3. (intransitive) To break apart; to split.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queen, II.vi:
      The varlet at his plaint was grieu'd so sore, / That his deepe wounded hart in two did riue [].
    • John Woodward (1665-1728)
      Freestone rives, splits, and breaks in any direction.
  4. (transitive, rare) To burst open; explode; discharge.
    • 1821, William Shakespeare, ‎James Boswell, ‎Richard Farmer, The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare:
      Ten thousand French have ta'en the sacrament, To rive their dangerous artillery
  5. (woodworking) To use a technique of splitting or sawing wood radially from a log (e.g. clapboards).

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive (plural rives)

  1. A place torn; a rent; a rift.

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /riːvə/, [ˈʁiːwə]

Noun[edit]

rive c (singular definite riven, plural indefinite river)

  1. rake
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /riːvə/, [ˈʁiːwə]

Verb[edit]

rive (imperative riv, infinitive at rive, present tense river, past tense rev, past participle har revet)

  1. rake
  2. grate
  3. scratch, tear, rip

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ripa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f (plural rives)

  1. bank (of a river)

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French arriver (happen)

Verb[edit]

rive

  1. happen

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ripa.

Noun[edit]

rive f (plural rivis)

  1. slope, ascent
  2. shore

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f

  1. plural of riva

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

rīve

  1. vocative singular of rīvus

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f, m (definite singular riva or riven, indefinite plural river, definite plural rivene)

  1. a rake (garden and agricultural tool)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rive (imperative riv, present tense river, passive rives, simple past rev or reiv, past participle revet, present participle rivende)

  1. to grate
  2. to scratch, tear, rip
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Noun[edit]

rive f (definite singular riva, indefinite plural river, definite plural rivene)

  1. a rake (garden and agricultural tool)

References[edit]