rive

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English riven ‎(to rive), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse rīfa ‎(to rend, tear apart), from Proto-Germanic *rīfaną ‎(to tear, scratch), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)reip- ‎(to crumble, tear). Cognate with Danish rive ‎(to tear), Old Frisian rīva ‎(to tear), Old English ārǣfan ‎(to let loose, unwrap), Old Norse ript ‎(rift, breach of contract), Norwegian rive ‎(to tear) and Albanian rrip ‎(belt, rope). More at rift.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rive ‎(third-person singular simple present rives, present participle riving, simple past rived or rove, past participle rived or riven)

  1. (transitive, archaic except in past participle) To tear apart by force; to split; to cleave.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      I have seen tempests, when the scolding winds / Have rived the knotty oaks []
  2. (transitive, archaic) To pierce or cleave with a weapon.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book II, chapter vj:
      And therwith she toke the swerd from her loue that lay ded and fylle to the ground in a swowne / And whan she aroos she made grete dole out of mesure / the whiche sorowe greued Balyn passyngly sore / and he wente vnto her for to haue taken the swerd oute of her hād but [] sodenly she sette the pomell to the ground / and rofe her self thorow the body
  3. (intransitive) To break apart; to split.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queen, II.vi:
      The varlet at his plaint was grieu'd so sore, / That his deepe wounded hart in two did riue [].
    • John Woodward (1665-1728)
      Freestone rives, splits, and breaks in any direction.
  4. (transitive, rare) To burst open; explode; discharge.
    • 1821, William Shakespeare, ‎James Boswell, ‎Richard Farmer, The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare:
      Ten thousand French have ta'en the sacrament, To rive their dangerous artillery
  5. (woodworking) To use a technique of splitting or sawing wood radially from a log (e.g. clapboards).

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive ‎(plural rives)

  1. A place torn; a rent; a rift.

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /riːvə/, [ˈʁiːwə]

Noun[edit]

rive c (singular definite riven, plural indefinite river)

  1. rake
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /riːvə/, [ˈʁiːwə]

Verb[edit]

rive (imperative riv, infinitive at rive, present tense river, past tense rev, past participle har revet)

  1. rake
  2. grate
  3. scratch, tear, rip

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ripa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f ‎(plural rives)

  1. bank (of a river)

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French arriver ‎(happen)

Verb[edit]

rive

  1. happen

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ripa.

Noun[edit]

rive f ‎(plural rivis)

  1. slope, ascent
  2. shore

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f

  1. plural of riva

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

rīve

  1. vocative singular of rīvus

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rive f, m ‎(definite singular riva or riven, indefinite plural river, definite plural rivene)

  1. a rake (garden and agricultural tool)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rífa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

rive ‎(imperative riv, present tense river, passive rives, simple past rev or reiv, past participle revet, present participle rivende)

  1. to grate
  2. to scratch, tear, rip
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hrífa.

Noun[edit]

rive f ‎(definite singular riva, indefinite plural river, definite plural rivene)

  1. a rake (garden and agricultural tool)

References[edit]