raven

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See also: Raven and räven

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A raven (bird).
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Wikispecies From Middle English raven, reven, from Old English hræfn, from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz (compare Icelandic hrafn, Dutch raaf, German Rabe, Danish and Norwegian Bokmål ravn, Norwegian Nynorsk ramn), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱorh₂- (compare Middle Irish crú, Latin corvus, Lithuanian šárka (magpie), Serbo-Croatian svrȁka ‘id.’, Ancient Greek κόραξ (kórax)), from *ḱer-, *ḱor- (compare Latin crepō ‘I creak, crack’, Sanskrit कृपते (kṛpate) ("he laments", "he implores").

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

raven (plural ravens)

  1. A common name for several, generally large and lustrous black species of birds in the genus Corvus, especially the common raven, Corvus corax.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

raven (not comparable)

  1. Of the color of the raven; jet-black
    raven curls
    raven darkness
    She was a tall, sophisticated, raven-haired beauty.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French raviner (rush, seize by force), itself from ravine (rapine), from Latin rapina (plundering, loot), itself from rapere (seize, plunder, abduct).

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

raven (plural ravens)

  1. Rapine; rapacity.
  2. Prey; plunder; food obtained by violence.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

raven (third-person singular simple present ravens, present participle ravening, simple past and past participle ravened)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To obtain or seize by violence.
  2. (transitive) To devour with great eagerness.
  3. (transitive) To prey on with rapacity.
    The raven is both a scavenger, who ravens a dead animal almost like a vulture, and a bird of prey, who commonly ravens to catch a rodent.
  4. (intransitive) To show rapacity; to be greedy (for something).
    • 1587, Leonard Mascall, The First Booke of Cattell, London, “The nature and qualities of hogges, and also the gouernement thereof,”[1]
      [] because hogs are commonly rauening for their meat, more then other cattel, it is meet therefore to haue them ringed, or else they wil doe much hurt in digging and turning vp corne fieldes []
    • 1852, Elizabeth Gaskell, “The Old Nurse’s Story” in The Old Nurse’s Story and Other Tales,[2]
      They passed along towards the great hall-door, where the winds howled and ravened for their prey []
    • 1865, Sabine Baring-Gould, The Book of Were-Wolves, London: Smith, Elder & Co., Chapter 8, p. 114,[3]
      The Greek were-wolf is closely related to the vampire. The lycanthropist falls into a cataleptic trance, during which his soul leaves his body, enters that of a wolf and ravens for blood.
    • 1931, James B. Fagan, The Improper Duchess, London: Victor Gollancz, 1932, Act 3, p. 237,[4]
      On one side the great temple where you can gather the good harvest—on the other a dirty little scandal that you’ve nosed out to fling to paper scavengers who feed it to their readin’ millions ravening for pornographic dirt.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • raven” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017. [5]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English rave.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

raven

  1. to (hold a) rave, to party wildly
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of raven (weak)
infinitive raven
past singular ravede
past participle geraved
infinitive raven
gerund raven n
verbal noun
present tense past tense
1st person singular rave ravede
2nd person sing. (jij) ravet ravede
2nd person sing. (u) ravet ravede
2nd person sing. (gij) ravet ravede
3rd person singular ravet ravede
plural raven raveden
subjunctive sing.1 rave ravede
subjunctive plur.1 raven raveden
imperative sing. rave
imperative plur.1 ravet
participles ravend geraved
1) Archaic.

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

raven

  1. Plural form of raaf

Anagrams[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *ravan, from Proto-Germanic *hrabnaz.

Noun[edit]

rāven m

  1. raven

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • raven”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • raven”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See Serbo-Croatian ravan

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ráven (comparative rávnejši, superlative nàjrávnejši)

  1. even, level

Declension[edit]