large

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See also: larĝe

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English large, from Old French large, from Latin larga, feminine of largus (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much). Mostly displaced Middle English stoor, stour (large, great) (from Old English stōr) and muchel (large, great) (from Old English myċel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

large (comparative larger, superlative largest)

  1. Of considerable or relatively great size or extent.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke.
    Russia is a large country.   The fruit-fly has large eyes for its body size.   He has a large collection of stamps.
  2. (obsolete) Abundant; ample.
  3. (archaic) Full in statement; diffuse; profuse.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Felton
      I might be very large upon the importance and advantages of education.
  4. (obsolete) Free; unencumbered.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Fairfax
      Of burdens all he set the Paynims large.
  5. (obsolete) Unrestrained by decorum; said of language.
  6. (nautical) Crossing the line of a ship's course in a favorable direction; said of the wind when it is abeam, or between the beam and the quarter.

Synonyms[edit]

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Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

large (countable and uncountable, plural larges)

  1. (music, obsolete) An old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.
  2. (obsolete) Liberality, generosity.
  3. (slang, plural: large) A thousand dollars/pounds.
    Getting a car tricked out like that will cost you 50 large.
  4. A large serving of something.
    One small coffee and two larges, please.

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French large, from Latin largus, larga, largum (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much). The feminine is inherited, but for the masculine, Latin largum (the masculine and neuter accusative) developed into Old French larc, which was discarded.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

large (plural larges)

  1. wide, broad
  2. large
  3. generous

Noun[edit]

large m (plural larges)

  1. open sea
  2. width

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]
edit
  • Antillean Creole: laj
  • Haitian Creole: laj
  • Karipúna Creole French: laj
  • Louisiana Creole French: laj, larj

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adverb[edit]

largē (comparative largius, superlative largissimē)

  1. munificently, generously, liberally.
  2. abundantly, copiously.
  3. to a great extent.

Adjective[edit]

large

  1. vocative masculine singular of largus

References[edit]

  • large in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • large in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French large, from Latin largus (abundant, plentiful, copious, large, much).

Adjective[edit]

large m, f

  1. (Jersey) wide

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

large m (plural larges)

  1. (Jersey, nautical) open sea, deep sea
    Synonym: plieine mé

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • larc (Roman de Renard, "wide")

Etymology[edit]

From Latin largus, larga.

Adjective[edit]

large m (oblique and nominative feminine singular large)

  1. generous
  2. large; big
  3. wide (when used to differentiate between height, width and length)

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]