grand

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See also: Grand, grànd, gränd, grand-, and grand'

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis.

Adjective[edit]

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
    • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard
      In the mean time, Cluffe had arrived. He was a little bit huffed and grand at being nailed as an evidence, upon a few words carelessly, or, if you will, confidentially dropped at his own mess-table, where Lowe chanced to be a guest; and certainly with no suspicion that his little story could in any way be made to elucidate the mystery of Sturk's murder.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent.
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
    A cup of tea? That'd be grand.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

grand (plural grand)

  1. A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music) A grand piano
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun[edit]

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it's a shame that I don't even have a grand.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Bourguignon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis.

Adjective[edit]

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, /ɡʁɑ̃t/ (when followed by a word beginning with a vowel)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
    Alexandre le GrandAlexander the Great
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
    un grand tricheura big fat cheater
  5. extensive, large

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective[edit]

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants[edit]


Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (file)
    (Jersey)

Adjective[edit]

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant
    Huru kommer det till, att du ser grandet i din broders öga, men icke bliver varse bjälken i ditt eget öga?
    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? (Matthew 7:3)

Usage notes[edit]

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a "Grand Hotel" available in several towns

Declension[edit]

Declension of grand 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative grand grandet grand granden
Genitive grands grandets grands grandens

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. large, big