gros

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gros, gròs, grôs, grös, and groš

Alemannic German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German gras, from Proto-Germanic *grasą. Cognate with German Gras, Dutch gras, English grass, Icelandic gras.

Noun[edit]

gros n

  1. (Carcoforo) grass

References[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grossus. Compare Romanian gros.

Adjective[edit]

gros

  1. thick

Bavarian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gros ? 

  1. (Sauris) grass

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grossus, possibly ultimately of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gros (feminine grossa, masculine plural grossos, feminine plural grosses)

  1. big, large

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch gros, from Old French gros, from Latin grossus; gross sense probably directly from French.

Noun[edit]

gros n (plural grossen, diminutive grosje n)

  1. (countable) a gross; a dozen dozens, 144
  2. (uncountable) the bulk, largest part, largest proportion, majority
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Papiamentu: gròs

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Cf. German Groschen and Latin grossus.

Noun[edit]

gros m (plural grossen, diminutive grosje n)

  1. groschen, a former German coin.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gros, from Latin grossus, possibly ultimately of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gros (feminine grosse, masculine plural gros, feminine plural grosses)

  1. big, thick, fat
    Synonym: épais
    Mon petit copain a des gros doigts.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. coarse, rough
  3. (Louisiana) famous

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

gros m (plural gros)

  1. a person in overweight
  2. the bulk, the majority
    Le gros de la négociation c'est la baisse de prix d'achat du produit.The bulk of the negotiation is lowering the purchasing price of the product.

Descendants[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese grosso. Cognate with Kabuverdianu grós.

Adjective[edit]

gros

  1. thick

Hunsrik[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German grōz, from Old High German grōz, from Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gros (comparative greser, superlative grest)

  1. big, large
    en groses Haus
    a big house
  2. (of a person) tall
    Er is en groser Mann.
    He is a tall man.

Declension[edit]

Declension of gros
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative gros gros gros grose
accusative grose gros gros grose
dative grose grose grose grose
Strong inflection nominative groser grose groses grose
accusative grose grose groses grose
dative grosem groser grosem grose

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Mòcheno[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gras, from Old High German gras, from Proto-West Germanic *gras, from Proto-Germanic *grasą (grass). Cognate with German Gras, English grass.

Noun[edit]

gros n

  1. grass

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French gros, from Latin grossus, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Jersey)
    (file)

Adjective[edit]

gros m

  1. large

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grossus, possibly ultimately of Germanic origin.

Adjective[edit]

gros m (oblique and nominative feminine singular grose or grosse)

  1. big; large

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grossus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gros m or n (feminine singular groasă, masculine plural groși, feminine and neuter plural groase)

  1. thick

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grọ̑s m inan

  1. A gross, 144.

Inflection[edit]

As the -s- is not pronounced, the stem really ends in a vowel, and is extended with -j- when endings are attached. In writing, the declension can be either soft (following the pronunciation) or hard (following the spelling).

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. grós
gen. sing. grósa
singular dual plural
nominative grós grósa grósi
accusative grós grósa gróse
genitive grósa grósov grósov
dative grósu grósoma grósom
locative grósu grósih grósih
instrumental grósom grósoma grósi

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German and Old High German gras, from Proto-West Germanic *gras.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grōs n

  1. grass