grande

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See also: Grande

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Italian grande. Doublet of grand and grandee.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɑndeɪ/, /ˈɡɹændeɪ/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

grande (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly US) Of a cup of coffee: smaller than venti but larger than tall, usually 16 ounces.

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grande (comparative more grande, superlative most grande)

  1. Alternative form of grand
    • 1972, Russell Sage College, Studies in the Twentieth Century, page 79:
      Almost symbolically, Lopahin still plays the peasant and Lyubov the grande mistress.
    • 1993, Donald S. Metz, Madame President, New Saga Publishers, →ISBN, pages 147, 270:
      A supremely happy family waved goodbye to an elderly grande dame and a namesake who had just enrolled in her first lesson in becoming a grande lady. [] In Litchfield, Connecticut, the Hutchinson brothers rushed to tell the grande old dame her daughter was making history.
    • 1997, Alzina Stone Dale, Mystery Reader’s Walking Guide: New York, →ISBN, page 217:
      In Shannon O’Cork’s The Murder of Muriel Lake, which is about a Writers of Mystery Convention (aka MWA?), grande mistress Muriel Lake was murdered.
    • 2011, Richard Allen Brooks, “Dame Johnson”, in From Life to Death, Xlibris, →ISBN, page 28:
      THIS GRANDE LADY IS
      DIS-TIN-GUISH-A-BLE IN HER
      DEMURE DELIVERIES.
      DELIGHTFUL AND DAZZLING,
      THE LADY IS DEFINITELY
      A DIVA.
    • 2013, Chet Belmonte, Meadowdale: A Saga of Confinement, AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 223:
      That made eight deaths in a matter of a few days—all of them tied inexplicably to this “grande lady” herself—Meadowdale Prison.
    • 2016, Victor Milán, The Dinosaur Knights, Tor Books, →ISBN, page 101:
      Her silence now had the quality of the comfortable silences between friends, not the half-respectful, half-fearful types of a servant not spoken to by her grande mistress.
    • 2016, Jennie Gilbert Ross, The Wrong Side of the Blanket, Archway Publishing, →ISBN:
      Annabella Kristina Ramona Toaltz was a grande name for a grande woman.

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gran (apocopic, before a singular noun)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grande (epicene, plural grandes)

  1. large, big
    Antonym: pequeñu

Related terms[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis, grandem (large, great).

Adjective[edit]

grande

  1. big

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Spanish grande.

Noun[edit]

grande c (singular definite granden, plural indefinite grander)

  1. grandee
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Danish grannæ, from Old Norse granni, from Proto-Germanic *garaznô (neighbour).

Noun[edit]

grande c (singular definite granden, plural indefinite grander)

  1. (archaic) neighbour

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grande

  1. feminine singular of grand

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese grande, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grande m or f (plural grandes)

  1. large
    Synonyms: enorme, groso

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grande (comparative major, superlative le major or le maxime)

  1. big, large
    Antonym: parve
  2. great

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandem, accusative form of grandis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡran.de/, [ˈɡr̺än̪d̪e̞]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: gràn‧de

Adjective[edit]

grande m or f (masculine and feminine plural grandi, comparative più grande or maggiore, superlative grandissimo or massimo or sommo)

  1. of greater physical dimensions or numerosity
    1. big (size)
    2. large (quantity)
    3. tall
    4. wide, broad
    5. long
  2. great (importance)
  3. (colloquial) Synonym of bravo

Usage notes[edit]

  • The apocopic form gran may be used before singular nouns that start with a consonant. Before singular nouns that start with an impure s, using the apocopic form is ungrammatical but often used in spoken lanugage. Before nouns that start with a vowel, grande can be elided by use of an apostrophe.

Adverb[edit]

grande

  1. really (intensifier)
    un gran bel piattoa really great dish

Interjection[edit]

grande

  1. great!

Noun[edit]

grande m or f (plural grandi)

  1. adult, grownup
  2. great (person of major significance)
    i grandi della literaturethe greats of literature
  3. (uncountable) greatness, magnificence
    ammirare il grande nell'arteto admire the greatness in art

Derived terms[edit]


Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis.

Adjective[edit]

grande (Latin spelling)

  1. big

Noun[edit]

grande m (Latin spelling)

  1. adult

Ligurian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandem, form of grandis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grande (masculine plural grendi, feminine plural grende)

  1. big
  2. large
  3. great

Antonyms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From grandis (large, great).

Adverb[edit]

grandē (comparative grandius, superlative grandissimē)

  1. greatly
  2. (poetic) loudly, aloud

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • grande in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • grande in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • grande in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a weighty example, precedent: exemplum magnum, grande
    • elevated, moderate, plain style: genus dicendi grave or grande, medium, tenue (cf. Or. 5. 20; 6. 21)
    • exorbitant rate of interest: fenus iniquissimum, grande, grave
    • to incur debts on a large scale: grande, magnum (opp. exiguum) aes alienum conflare
  • grande in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)

Norman[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
    (Jersey)

Adjective[edit]

grande

  1. feminine singular of grànd, grand

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • grant ('grande' steadily replaces 'grant' during the Old French period)

Adjective[edit]

grande

  1. nominative feminine singular of grant
    • late 12th century, anonymous, La Folie de Tristan d'Oxford, page 354 (of the Champion Classiques edition of Le Roman de Tristan, →ISBN, lines 67-70:
      La nef ert fort e belle e grande,
      bone cum cele k'ert markande.
      De plusurs mers chargee esteit,
      en Engleterre curre devait.
      The ship was strong and beautiful and big,
      good like a merchant's ship
      loaded with lots of different type of merchandise
      ready to set sail to England.
  2. oblique feminine singular of grant

Old Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective[edit]

grande

  1. big, great

Descendants[edit]

  • Fala: grandi
  • Galician: grande
  • Portuguese: grande

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • grãde (obsolete, abbreviation)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese grande, from Latin grandis, of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grande m or f (plural grandes, comparable)

  1. large; great; big (of great size or extent)
    Este livro é grande.This book is big.
    Este livro é maior do que aquele.This book is bigger than that one.
  2. large; big; numerous (numerically large)
    Tua família é muito grande.Your family is very large.
  3. (preceding nouns) great (of great importance)
    Os grandes reis da antiguidade.The great kings of antiquity.
  4. (preceding nouns) great; magnanimous (noble and generous in spirit)
    Artur foi um grande rei.Arthur was a great king.
  5. grown-up; mature
    Já és grande, podes trabalhar.You’re already grown-up, you can work.
  6. (followed by a city’s name) the metropolitan area of, greater
    Moro na grande Londres.I live in the metropolis of London.
    Grande Manchester é uma região metropolitana no noroeste da Inglaterra.Greater Manchester is a metropolitan area in the north-west of England.

Inflection[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:grande.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

grande m, f (plural grandes)

  1. (Brazil, colloquial, used in the vocative) A term of address for someone
    Synonyms: amigo, chefe

Further reading[edit]

  • grande” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gran (preceding a singular noun)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin grandis, grandem (large, great), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾande/, [ˈɡɾãn̪.d̪e]
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

grande (plural grandes) superlative: grandísimo/el mayor

  1. (after the noun or predicatively) big, large
    Synonyms: amplio (for cloth, shoe, place), voluminoso
    Antonyms: chico, pequeño
  2. (before a plural noun) great
    Synonym: grandioso
    Antonym: irrelevante
  3. (about human age) aged, old
    Mi papá ya es muy grande para hacer eso.My dad is now a bit old to do that.
    Synonyms: anciano, viejo
    Antonyms: chico, joven, pequeño

Usage notes[edit]

  • When used before and in the same noun phrase as the modified singular noun, the apocopic form gran (great) is used instead of grande.

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

grande m (plural grandes)

  1. grandee

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]