maior

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See also: maiôr

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin māior, māiōrem.

Adjective[edit]

maior m, f (plural maiores)

  1. major, greater
  2. (music) major

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *magjōs, from Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂yōs‎, from *meǵh₂- ‎(great) + *-yōs (comparative suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

māior ‎(comparative of magnus)

  1. greater, larger

Inflection[edit]

Third declension, comparative variant

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
nominative māior māius māiōrēs māiōra
genitive māiōris māiōrum
dative māiōrī māiōribus
accusative māiōrem māius māiōrēs māiōra
ablative māiōre māiōribus
vocative māior māius māiōrēs māiōra

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

māior m ‎(genitive māiōris); third declension

  1. ancestors (in plural)
    Ergo illum, qui haec fecerat, Rudinum hominem, maiores nostri in civitatem recepterunt.
    Therefore Ennius, who composed these poems, although a man from Rudiae, our ancestors granted him citizenship.
    - Cicero: Pro Archia Poeta Oratio (Line 284)
  2. (medieval) A mayor: a leader of a city or town.
Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative māior māiōrēs
genitive māiōris māiōrum
dative māiōrī māiōribus
accusative māiōrem māiōrēs
ablative māiōre māiōribus
vocative māior māiōrēs

References[edit]

  • maior” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • maior” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the elde: maior (natu)
    • the majority: maior pars
    • (ambiguous) to exaggerate a thing: in maius ferre, in maius extollere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to overestimate a thing: in maius accipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to deteriorate: a maiorum virtute desciscere, degenerare, deflectere
    • (ambiguous) according to the custom and tradition of my fathers: more institutoque maiorum (Mur. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) what is more important: quod maius est
  • maior” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin maior.

Adjective[edit]

maior ‎(oblique singular, nominative singular maire)

  1. bigger; larger
  2. very large

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese maior, mayor, from Latin māior, māiōrem, from Proto-Indo-European *mag- ‎(great) + *-yos (comparative suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

maior ‎(plural maiores, comparable)

  1. major, greater
  2. (music) major

Antonyms[edit]