mare

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mare, mere, from Old English mīere (female horse, mare), from Proto-West Germanic *marhijā, from Proto-Germanic *marhijō (female horse), from *marhaz (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (plural mares)

  1. An adult female horse.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], →OCLC:
      But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ [] The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window at the old mare feeding in the meadow below by the brook, and a 'bead' could be drawn upon Molly, the dairymaid, kissing the fogger behind the hedge, [].
  2. (UK, derogatory, slang) A foolish woman.
    • 2007, Hester Browne, Little Lady, Big Apple:
      The silly mare phoned your mother, talking about applying for a mortgage, and we don't want that, do we?
Antonyms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
  • (adult female horse): foal (young horse), colt (young male horse) and filly (young female horse); pony can refer to adult horses of either sex under a certain height.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English mare (nightmare, monster), from Proto-West Germanic *marā, from Proto-Germanic *marǭ (nightmare, incubus), from Proto-Indo-European *mor- (feminine evil spirit). Doublet of mara.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (plural mares)

  1. (obsolete or historical) A type of evil spirit formerly thought to sit on the chest of a sleeping person; also, the feeling of suffocation felt during sleep, attributed to such a spirit.
  2. (UK, Ireland, Commonwealth, colloquial) A nightmare; a frustrating or terrible experience.
    I'm having a complete mare today.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mare (sea). Doublet of mar and mere.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (plural maria)

  1. (planetology) A large, dark plain, which may have the appearance of a sea, such as those on the Moon
  2. (planetology) On Saturn's moon Titan, any of several lakes which are large expanses of what is thought to be liquid hydrocarbons.
    Kraken Mare (a lake of liquid hydrocarbons on Titan which is slightly larger than the Caspian Sea)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See mayor.

Noun[edit]

mare (plural mares)

  1. Obsolete form of mayor.
  2. Obsolete form of mair.

Anagrams[edit]

Afar[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maˈre/, [mʌˈɾɛ]
  • Hyphenation: ma‧re

Noun[edit]

maré f (singulative maréyta m or mareytá f)

  1. family, relationship

Declension[edit]

Declension of maré
absolutive maré
predicative maré
subjective maré
genitive maré
Postpositioned forms
l-case marél
k-case marék
t-case marét
h-case maréh

Verb[edit]

maré

  1. (Northern Afar, intransitive) live
  2. (Northern Afar, intransitive) continue

Conjugation[edit]

    Conjugation of mare (type II verb)
1st singular 2nd singular 3rd singular 1st plural 2nd plural 3rd plural
m f
perfective V-affirmative maréh martéh maréh martéh marréh marteeníh mareeníh
N-affirmative maré marté maré marté marré martén marén
negative mámarinniyo mámarinnito mámarinna mámarinna mámarinnino mámarinniton mámarinnon
imperfective V-affirmative maráh martáh maráh martáh marráh martaanáh maraanáh
N-affirmative mará martá mará martá marrá martán marán
negative mámara mámarta mámara mámarta mámarra mámartan mámaran
prospective V-affirmative maréliyoh
maréyyoh
marélitoh
maréttoh
maréleh maréleh marélinoh
marénnoh
marélitoonuh
maréttoonuh
maréloonuh
N-affirmative maréliyo
maréyyo
marélito
marétto
maréle maréle marélino
marénno
maréliton
marétton
marélon
conjunctive I V-affirmative máruh mártuh máruh mártuh máruh martóonuh maróonuh
N-affirmative máru mártu máru mártu máru martón marón
negative maré wáyuh maré wáytuh maré wáyuh maré wáytuh maré wáynuh maré waytóonuh maré wóonuh
conjunctive II V-affirmative maránkeh martánkeh maránkeh martánkeh marránkeh martaanánkeh maraanánkeh
N-affirmative maránke martánke maránke martánke marránke martaanánke maraanánke
negative maré wáankeh maré waytánkeh maré wáankeh maré waytánkeh maré waynánkeh maré waytaanánkeh maré wáankeh
jussive affirmative máray mártay máray mártay máray martóonay maróonay
negative maré wáay maré wáytay maré wáay maré wáytay maré wáynay maré waytóonay maré wóonay
past
conditional
affirmative marinniyóy marinnitóy marinnáy marinnáy marinninóy marinnitoonúy marinnoonúy
negative maré wanniyóy maré wannitóy maré wannáy maré wannáy maré wanninóy maré wannitoonúy maré wanninoonúy
present
conditional I
affirmative marék marték marék marték marrék marteeník mareeník
negative maré wéek maré wayték maré wéek maré wayték maré waynék maré wayteeník maré weeník
singular plural singular plural
consultative affirmative maróo marróo imperative affirmative már mára
negative mamaróo mamarróo negative mámarin mámarina
-h converb -i form -k converb -in(n)uh converb -innuk converb infinitive indefinite participle
V-focus N-focus
márah mári márak marínnuh marínnuk maríyya marináanih marináan
Compound tenses
past perfect affirmative perfective + perfective of én or sugé
present perfect affirmative perfective + imperfective of én
future perfect affirmative perfective + prospective of sugé
past progressive -k converb + imperfective of én or sugé
present progressive affirmative imperfect + imperfective of én
future progressive -k converb + prospective of sugé
immediate future affirmative conjunctive I + imperfective of wée
imperfect potential I affirmative conjunctive I + imperfective of takké
imperfect
potential II
affirmative imperfective + -m + takké
negative maré + imperfective of wée + -m + takké
perfect
potential
affirmative perfective + -m + takké
negative maré + perfective of wée + -m + takké
present
conditional II
affirmative imperfective + object pronoun + tekkék
negative maré + perfective of wée + object pronoun + tekkék
perfect
conditional
affirmative perfective + imperfective of sugé + -k
negative perfective + sugé + imperfective of wée -k
irrealis maré + perfective of xaaxé or raaré

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “mare”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Plurale tantum; plural of variant marë, borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin marum (cat thyme, kind of sage).

Noun[edit]

mare f (definite marja)

  1. strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)
  2. strawberry tree fruit

Derived terms[edit]

Aromanian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mare

  1. Alternative form of mari

Bikol Central[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ma‧re
  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾe/, [ˈma.ɾe]

Verb[edit]

máre

  1. Misspelling of mari.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan mare, from Latin māter, mātrem, from Proto-Italic *mātēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr. Compare Occitan maire, French mère, Spanish madre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. mother
    mare subrogadasurrogate mother
  2. uterus (of an animal)
    Synonym: úter
  3. (by analogy) main course of a river or canal; channel
  4. (Mallorca, playground games) home

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Corsican[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare m

  1. sea

Further reading[edit]

  • mare” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa

Danish[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mara.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare c (singular definite maren, plural indefinite marer)

  1. (folklore) a mare (an evil spirit)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch mâre, from Old Dutch māri, from Proto-West Germanic *mārī (story).

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. (archaic) message, report, story
    Synonyms: bericht, tijding, verslag, verhaal
  2. (archaic) rumor
    Synonym: gerucht
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Medieval Latin mara (standing water), from Latin mare (sea). Related to German Maar.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. depression in non-volcanic stone, compare maar

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Dutch māre (incubus), from Old Dutch *mara, from Proto-West Germanic *marā, from Proto-Germanic *marǭ.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares, diminutive maartje n)

  1. a nocturnal monster or spirit that torments its victims while they are sleeping
  2. nightmare
  3. witch
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. (dated or formal) singular present subjunctive of maren

Anagrams[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French mare, from Old French mare, from Old Norse marr (lake, sea, pool), from Proto-Germanic *mari (lake, sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Doublet of mer inherited from Latin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. puddle
  2. pool

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin mare (sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmarə]
  • Hyphenation: ma‧rê

Noun[edit]

marê (first-person possessive mareku, second-person possessive maremu, third-person possessive marenya)

  1. (astronomy, planetology) A large, dark plain, which may have the appearance of a sea.

Further reading[edit]

Istriot[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 99:
      Cume li va puleîto in alto mare!
      How they row well on the high seas!
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin māter.

Noun[edit]

mare f

  1. mother

See also[edit]

Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare m (plural mari)

  1. sea

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mare in Collins Italian-English Dictionary
  • mare in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams[edit]

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mare

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まれ

Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
mare

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun[edit]

mare n (genitive maris); third declension

  1. sea
    • c. 270 BCEc. 201 BCE, Gnaeus Naevius, Bellum Punicum , (fragment in Priscian, Institutiones Grammaticae, 7, De genetivo plurali tertiae declinationis):
      Neptunum regnatorem marum
      Neptune, ruler of the seas
    • c. 52 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 5.1:
      [facit...] ad onera ac multitudinem iumentorum transportandam paulo latiores quam quibus in reliquis utimur maribus.
      In order to transport cargo and beasts of burden, he [Julius Caesar] had them made a little wider than the ones we use in other seas.
    • 13th c., Roger Bacon, Secretum Secretorum 2.29 (De preparacione carnum viperarum sive serpentum et draconum):
      Et oportet ut alienentur cornute et varie et aspides declines ad albedinem. Et non capiantur ex piscinis vel litoribus fluviorum et aquarum vel marium, vel de petrosis, quoniam in eis sunt quercine, facientes sitim, immo capiantur in loco longinquo ab humorositate.
    • 1921, Joseph Pope, George Monro Grant, Canada's official motto :
      a marī usque ad mare
      from sea to sea
Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, “pure” i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mare maria
Genitive maris marium
marum
Dative marī maribus
Accusative mare maria
Ablative marī
mare
maribus
Vocative mare maria
  • The ablative singular can be marī or mare.
  • The genitive plural form marium, although regularly formed for an i-stem noun, is not attested in the corpus of classical texts. Marum is found only once, in a line from Gnaeus Naevius.
  • The 5th/6th-century grammarian Priscian (Institutiones 7) says it is rarely used in the genitive plural, noting Caesar's use of maribus too. Similarly, the 4th-century grammarian Charisius claims it lacks both a genitive plural *marium and a *maribus form (but see the quotation from Julius Caesar above):

    "maria" tamen quamvis dicantur pluraliter, attamen nec "marium" nec "maribus" dicemus
    — although maria can be said in the plural, nevertheless we won't say marium nor maribus (Ars 1.11).

Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Balkan Romance:
    • Aromanian: amari, amare, mari
    • Istro-Romanian: måre
    • Megleno-Romanian: mari
    • Romanian: mare f
  • Gallo-Italic:
  • Italo-Dalmatian:
  • Navarro-Aragonese:
  • Old French: mer f
  • Old Leonese: *mar
  • Old Occitan: mar
    • Catalan: mar m or f
    • Occitan: mar
  • Old Galician-Portuguese: mar m
    • Galician: mar m
    • Portuguese: mar m (see there for further descendants)
  • Old Spanish: mar
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
  • Venetian: mar
  • English: mare
  • Esperanto: maro
  • Interlingua: mar

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. ablative singular of mās

References[edit]

  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Anagrams[edit]

Marau[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *māri, from Proto-West Germanic *mārī.

Adjective[edit]

mâre

  1. famous, famed
  2. honoured, prestigious
  3. well-known
Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch māri, from Proto-Germanic *mēriją, related to Etymology 1 above.

Noun[edit]

mâre f

  1. fame, famousness
  2. rumour
  3. message
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Dutch *mara, from Proto-West Germanic *marā.

Noun[edit]

māre ?

  1. mare, nightmare (evil spirit)
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Munggui[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare ?

  1. sea (a vast mass of salty water)

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mare.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. (France, Guernsey) pool

Northern Sotho[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *màtáì.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. saliva

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mara.

Noun[edit]

mare f or m (definite singular mara or maren, indefinite plural marer, definite plural marene)

  1. (folklore) a mare (an evil spirit)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse mara f.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (definite singular mara, indefinite plural marer, definite plural marene)

  1. (folklore) a mare (an evil spirit)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse merja (to crush).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mara (split or a-infinitive)

Verb[edit]

mare (present tense marar, past tense mara, past participle mara, passive infinitive marast, present participle marande, imperative mare/mar)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *marā.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (nominative plural maran)

  1. mare (evil spirit thought to torment people in their sleep)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch mare (phantom, spirit).

Adjective[edit]

mare m (oblique and nominative feminine singular mare)

  1. evil; bad

Adverb[edit]

mare

  1. evilly; badly

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. singular optative active of marati (to die)

Papuma[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. inflection of marar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Most likely inherited from Latin maiōrem,[1] accusative singular of Latin maior, albeit with an unusual (though not impossible) phonological evolution. Compare Aromanian mari, Megleno-Romanian mari, Dalmatian maur, Portuguese mor, Logudorese mere and Campidanese meri.[2] An alternative, less likely theory proposes a derivation from Latin marem (“male”), with a semantic shift from "male" to "large", on an idiomatic basis (i.e. assuming that the expression "s-a făcut mare", meaning "[ 3rd-pers. sg. ] grew up" [literally "made themselves big"] initially referred exclusively to boys becoming men, and that it shifted over time to refer more broadly to physical growth, and by extension, being large). Other theories include a derivation from its homonym mare (meaning sea), and a substrate origin (either Proto-Albanian or Thracian).

Adjective[edit]

mare m or f or n (plural mari)

  1. big, large, great
    Antonym: mic
    O mare mare.A big sea.
  2. great, mighty
    Un om mare.A great man.
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mări)

  1. sea
    Când am mers la mare, am înotat un pic și mai târziu am prins un pește mare.
    When I went to sea, I swam a little and later caught a big fish.
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Giurgea, Ion (2016) “Etimologia adjectivului mare. O reconsiderare necesară”, in Limba română, LXV (3)[1] (in Romanian), Editura Academiei
  2. ^ Mensching, Guido, Remberger, Eva-Maria (2016) “Chapter 17: Sardinian”, in Ledgeway, Adam, Maiden, Martin, editors, The Oxford Guide to the Romance Languages[2], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 278

Sardinian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • mari (“Campidanese”)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare. Compare Italian mare.

Noun[edit]

mare m (plural mares)

  1. sea

Sonsorolese[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. boy

Tagalog[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Final clipping of kumare, from komadre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (Baybayin spelling ᜋᜇᜒ)

  1. (slang) close female friend; sister
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:kaibigan
    Coordinate terms: brad, pare, tol
    Ano'ng tsika, mare?
    What's the buzz, sister?

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • mare”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018
  • Zorc, R. David, San Miguel, Rachel (1993) Tagalog Slang Dictionary[4], Manila: De La Salle University Press, →ISBN

Tahitian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. (archaic) cough

Usage notes[edit]

Use hota.

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. Alternative form of mari (stone)

References[edit]

  • Frederik Sigismund Alexander de Clercq (1890) Bijdragen tot de kennis der Residentie Ternate, E.J. Brill

Venda[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Bantu *màtáì.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. saliva

Venetian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mater.

Noun[edit]

mare f (invariable)

  1. mother

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea

Zazaki[edit]

Zazaki Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia zza

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic مارا.

Noun[edit]

mare m or f

  1. marriage