mare

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See also: Mare, maré, Maré, marè, Marē, and måre

Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mare, mere, from Old English mere, miere (female horse, mare), from Proto-Germanic *marhijō (female horse) (compare Scots mere, meir, mear (mare), North Frisian mar (mare, horse), West Frisian merje (mare), Dutch merrie (mare), Danish mær (mare), Swedish märr (mare), Icelandic meri (mare), German Mähre (decrepit old horse)), from *marhaz (horse) (compare Old English mearh).

There are two proposals for the source of the Proto-Germanic:

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (plural mares)

  1. An adult female horse.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ [] The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window at the old mare feeding in the meadow below by the brook, and a 'bead' could be drawn upon Molly, the dairymaid, kissing the fogger behind the hedge, [].
  2. (Britain, pejorative, slang) A foolish woman.
    • 2007, Hester Browne, Little Lady, Big Apple
      The silly mare phoned your mother, talking about applying for a mortgage, and we don't want that, do we?
Antonyms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
  • (adult female horse): foal (young horse), colt (young male horse) and filly (young female horse), pony can refer to adult horses of either sex under a certain height.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English mare, from Old English mare (nightmare, monster), from Proto-Germanic *marǭ (nightmare, incubus) (compare Dutch (dial.) mare, German (dial.) Mahr, Old Norse mara ( > Danish mare, Swedish mara (incubus, nightmare)), from Proto-Indo-European *mor- (feminine evil spirit). Akin to Old Irish Morrígan (phantom queen), Albanian merë (horror), Polish zmora (nightmare), Czech mura (nightmare, moth), Greek Μόρα (Móra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare (plural mares)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects) A type of evil spirit thought to sit on the chest of a sleeping person; also the feeling of suffocation felt during sleep; a nightmare.
  2. (Britain, colloquial) (clipping of nightmare) A nightmare; a frustrating or terrible experience.
    I'm having a complete mare today.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mare (sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑːɹeɪ/, /ˈmeːɹi/, /ˈmɑːɹi/

Noun[edit]

mare (plural maria)

  1. (planetology) A large, dark plain, which may have the appearance of a sea.
  2. (planetology) On Saturn's moon Titan, a large expanse of what is thought to be liquid hydrocarbons.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Plurale tantum; plural of variant marë, from Latin marum (cat thyme, kind of sage).

Noun[edit]

mare f (definite singular marja)

  1. strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)
  2. strawberry tree fruit

Derived terms[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mare

  1. Alternative form of mari

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal [Term?], from Latin māter, mātrem, from Proto-Italic *mātēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. mother

Further reading[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare m

  1. sea

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mara.

Noun[edit]

mare c (singular definite maren, plural indefinite marer)

  1. incubus, succubus

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch mâre, from Old Dutch *māri, from Proto-Germanic *mēriją.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. (archaic) message, report, story
    Synonyms: bericht, tijding, verslag, verhaal
  2. (archaic) rumor
    Synonyms: gerucht
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. depression in non-volcanic stone, compare maar

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Dutch māre (incubus), from Old Dutch *mara, from Proto-Germanic *marǭ.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares, diminutive maartje n)

  1. a nocturnal monster or spirit that torments its victims while they are sleeping
  2. nightmare
  3. witch
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of maren

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French mare, from Old French mare, from Old Norse marr (lake, sea, pool), from Proto-Germanic *mari (lake, sea), from Proto-Indo-European *mari-, *mori- (marsh, lake, sea). Akin to Old High German meri (lake, sea) (German Meer), Old Saxon meri, Old English mere (pond, pool, mere) (English mere). More at mere.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. puddle
  2. pool

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Istriot[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 99:
      Cume li va puleîto in alto mare!
      How they row well on the high seas!

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin māter.

Noun[edit]

mare f

  1. mother

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it
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Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare m (plural mari)

  1. sea

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mare

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まれ

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare n (genitive maris); third declension

  1. sea
    • National motto of Canada:
      a mari usque ad marefrom sea to sea

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter “pure” i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mare maria
genitive maris marium
dative marī maribus
accusative mare maria
ablative marī maribus
vocative mare maria

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. ablative singular of mas

References[edit]

  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) there is a storm at sea: mare ventorum vi agitatur et turbatur
    • (ambiguous) the Mediterranean Sea: mare medium or internum
    • (ambiguous) the town lies near the sea: oppidum mari adiacet
    • (ambiguous) a promontory juts out into the sea: promunturium in mare procurrit
    • (ambiguous) a peninsula projects into the sea: paeninsula in mare excurrit, procurrit

Marau[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *māri, from Proto-Germanic *mērijaz.

Adjective[edit]

mâre

  1. famous, famed
  2. honoured, prestigious
  3. well-known
Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch māri, from Proto-Germanic *mēriją.

Noun[edit]

mâre f

  1. fame, famousness
  2. rumour
  3. message
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

māre ?

  1. mare, nightmare (evil spirit)
Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mare (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • mare (IV)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • mare (V)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • mare (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • mare (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • mare (III)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Munggui[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea (a vast mass of salty water)

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mare.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mares)

  1. (France, Guernsey) pool

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *marǭ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f (nominative plural maran)

  1. nightmare, evil spirit

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mare m (oblique and nominative feminine singular mare)

  1. evil; bad

Adverb[edit]

mare

  1. evilly; badly

Papuma[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of marar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of marar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of marar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of marar

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mārem, accusative singular of mās (male), from Proto-Indo-European *meryo (young man)

Adjective[edit]

mare m, f, n (plural mari)

  1. big, large, great
    Antonyms: mic
    O mare mare.A big sea.
  2. great, mighty
    Un om mare.A great man.
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun[edit]

mare f (plural mări)

  1. sea
    Când am mers la mare, am înotat un pic și mai târziu am prins un pește mare.
    When I went to sea, I swam a little and later caught a big fish.
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Sonsorolese[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. boy

Tahitian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. (archaic) cough

Usage notes[edit]

Use hota.


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin māter, mātrem. Compare Italian madre

Noun[edit]

mare f (invariable)

  1. mother

See also[edit]


Zazaki[edit]

Zazaki Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia zza

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic مارا.

Noun[edit]

mare ?

  1. marriage