mare

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See also: Mare, maré, Maré, Marē, and måre

Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English mare, mere, from Old English mere, miere ‎(female horse, mare), from Proto-Germanic *marhijō ‎(female horse), from Proto-Indo-European *márkos, *marḱ- ‎(horse). Cognate with Scots mere, meir, mear ‎(mare), North Frisian mar ‎(mare, horse), West Frisian merje ‎(mare), Dutch merrie ‎(mare), German Mähre ‎(decrepit old horse), Danish mær ‎(mare), Swedish märr ‎(mare), Icelandic meri ‎(mare). Related also to Old English mearh ‎(male horse, steed).

Alternative etymology cites derivation via Old English mere, miere, from Proto-Germanic *marhijō (compare Dutch merrie, German Mähre), from *marhaz ‎(horse) (compare Old English mearh), from Gaulish markos (compare Welsh march), from Iranian marikas (compare Old Persian marikas 'male, manly'), from maryas (compare Avestan mairya 'man; male animal'); akin to Sanskrit máryas 'young man; stallion'. More at marry.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare ‎(plural mares)

  1. An adult female horse.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
      But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ [] The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window at the old mare feeding in the meadow below by the brook, and a 'bead' could be drawn upon Molly, the dairymaid, kissing the fogger behind the hedge, [].
  2. (Britain, pejorative, slang) A foolish woman.
    • 2007, Hester Browne, Little Lady, Big Apple
      The silly mare phoned your mother, talking about applying for a mortgage, and we don't want that, do we?
Antonyms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
  • (adult female horse): foal and filly refer to younger horses, pony can refer to adult horses of either gender under a certain height.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English mare, from Old English mare ‎(nightmare, monster), from Proto-Germanic *marǭ ‎(nightmare, incubus) (compare Dutch (dial.) mare, German (dial.) Mahr, Old Norse mara ( > Danish mare, Swedish mara ‎(incubus, nightmare)), from Proto-Indo-European *mor- ‎(feminine evil spirit). Akin to Old Irish Morrígan ‎(phantom queen), Albanian tmerr ‎(horror), Polish zmora ‎(nightmare), Czech mura ‎(nightmare, moth), Greek Μόρα ‎(Móra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare ‎(plural mares)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects) A type of evil spirit thought to sit on the chest of a sleeping person; also the feeling of suffocation felt during sleep; a nightmare.
  2. (Britain, colloquial) (short for nightmare) A nightmare; a frustrating or terrible experience.
    I'm having a complete mare today.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin mare ‎(sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑːreɪ/, /ˈmeːri/, /ˈmɑːri/

Noun[edit]

mare ‎(plural maria)

  1. (planetology) A dark, large circular plain; a “sea”.
  2. (planetology) On Saturn's moon Titan, a large expanse of what is thought to be liquid hydrocarbons.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Plurale tantum; plural of variant marë, from Latin marum ‎(cat thyme, kind of sage).

Noun[edit]

mare f (definite singular marja)

  1. strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo)
  2. strawberry tree fruit

Derived terms[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mare

  1. Alternative form of mari

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal [Term?], from Latin māter, mātrem, from Proto-Italic *mātēr, from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural mares)

  1. mother

External links[edit]


Corsican[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare m

  1. sea

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mara.

Noun[edit]

mare c (singular definite maren, plural indefinite marer)

  1. incubus, succubus

Related terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch mare ‎(incubus), from Old Dutch *mara, from Proto-Germanic *marǭ.

Cognate with German Mär.

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. message, report, story
  2. rumor
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

mare

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of maren

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural maren, diminutive maartje n)

  1. depression in non-volcanic stone, compare maar

Etymology 3[edit]

Related to nachtmerrie ‎(nightmare), a compound in which the latter component (merrie ‎(female horse)) is a corruption of mare. Analogously related to the latter components in English nightmare and French cauchemar.

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural mares, diminutive maartje n)

  1. a nocturnal monster or spirit that torments its victims while they are sleeping
  2. nightmare
  3. witch
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French mare, from Old French mare, from Old Norse marr ‎(lake, sea, pool), from Proto-Germanic *mari ‎(lake, sea), from Proto-Indo-European *mari-, *mori- ‎(marsh, lake, sea). Akin to Old High German meri ("lake, sea"; > German Meer), Old Saxon meri, Old English mere ("pond, pool, mere"; > English mere). More at mere.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural mares)

  1. puddle
  2. pool

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Istriot[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 99:
      Cume li va puleîto in alto mare!
      How they row well on the high seas!

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mater, matrem.

Noun[edit]

mare f

  1. mother

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Sea-chile.jpg
Korea-Busan-Duseong peninsula-01.jpg

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare m ‎(plural mari)

  1. sea

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mare

  1. rōmaji reading of まれ

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare n ‎(genitive maris); third declension

  1. sea
    • National motto of Canada:
      a mari usque ad mare‎ ― from sea to sea

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter “pure” i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mare maria
genitive maris marium
dative marī maribus
accusative mare maria
ablative marī maribus
vocative mare maria

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare m

  1. ablative singular of mas

References[edit]

  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mare in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) there is a storm at sea: mare ventorum vi agitatur et turbatur
    • (ambiguous) the Mediterranean Sea: mare medium or internum
    • (ambiguous) the town lies near the sea: oppidum mari adiacet
    • (ambiguous) a promontory juts out into the sea: promunturium in mare procurrit
    • (ambiguous) a peninsula projects into the sea: paeninsula in mare excurrit, procurrit

Marau[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Munggui[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. sea (a vast mass of salty water)

Norman[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mare.

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural mares)

  1. (France, Guernsey) pool

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *marǭ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(nominative plural maran)

  1. nightmare, evil spirit

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mare m ‎(oblique and nominative feminine singular mare)

  1. evil; bad

Adverb[edit]

mare

  1. evilly; badly

Papuma[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Linguistic Situation in the Islands of Yapen, Kurudu, Nau and Miosnum, New Guinea (1961)

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mārem, accusative singular of mās ‎(male), from Proto-Indo-European *meryo ‎(young man)

Adjective[edit]

mare m, f, n ‎(plural mari)

  1. big, large, great
    O mare mare.
    A big sea.
  2. great, mighty
    Un om mare.
    A great man.
Inflection[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Italic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(plural mări)

  1. sea
    Când am mers la mare, am înotat un pic și mai târziu am prins un pește mare.
    When I went to sea, I swam a little and later caught a big fish.
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Sonsorolese[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. boy

Tahitian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mare

  1. (archaic) cough

Usage notes[edit]

Use hota.


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin māter, mātrem. Compare Italian madre

Noun[edit]

mare f ‎(invariable)

  1. mother

See also[edit]


Zazaki[edit]

Zazaki Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia zza

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic مارا.

Noun[edit]

mare ?

  1. marriage