sto

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: stó, stò, što, -sto, -stö, 'sto, and stø

Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs
Czech cardinal numbers
 <  99 100 101  > 
    Cardinal : sto
    Ordinal : stý

Etymology[edit]

From Old Czech sto, from Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsto]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sto n

  1. hundred (100)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sto in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sto in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɔ/*, /ˈstɔ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation: stò

Verb[edit]

sto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stare

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Kashubian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Numeral[edit]

sto

  1. hundred

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *staēō, from Proto-Indo-European *sth₂éh₁yeti, stative verb from *steh₂-. Cognate with Sanskrit तिष्ठति (tíṣṭhati) (root स्था (sthā)), Persian ایستا(istā, standing; stopping), Old Norse standa, Ancient Greek ἵστημι (hístēmi), στάσις (stásis), Bulgarian стоя (stoja), Old English standan (whence English stand).

By its appearance through Latin sound laws, this stative verb, against all others of this class in the 2nd conjugation, belongs to the 1st conjugation. The perfect and supine stems are shared with sistō, the corresponding athematic verb from the same Indo-European root.

Verb[edit]

stō (present infinitive stāre, perfect active stetī, supine statum); first conjugation, impersonal in the passive

  1. I stand
    Synonym: astō
  2. I stay, remain
    Synonyms: cōnstō, sistō, cōnsistō, remaneō, maneō, haereō
  3. I cost, I am set at, stand at (e.g., a price)
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.885-886:
      stat mihi nōn parvō virtūs mea: volnera testor
      armaque, quae sparsī sanguine saepe meō.’
      “My bravery costs me no small [price]: I call to witness my scars
      and weapons, which I have often splattered with my own blood.”

      (Mezentius replies to a request to fight for Turnus.)
  4. (Medieval Latin) I am
    Synonyms: adsum, subsum, astō, exstō
    Antonym: desum
  5. (Medieval Latin) I am [located at]
  6. (Medieval Latin) I live
Conjugation[edit]

Passive forms exist only in the third-person singular.

   Conjugation of stō (first conjugation, impersonal in passive)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present stō stās stat stāmus stātis stant
imperfect stābam stābās stābat stābāmus stābātis stābant
future stābō stābis stābit stābimus stābitis stābunt
perfect stetī stetistī stetit stetimus stetistis stetērunt,
stetēre
pluperfect steteram steterās steterat steterāmus steterātis steterant
future perfect steterō steteris steterit steterimus steteritis steterint
passive present stātur
imperfect stābātur
future stābitur
perfect statum est
pluperfect statum erat
future perfect statum erit
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present stem stēs stet stēmus stētis stent
imperfect stārem stārēs stāret stārēmus stārētis stārent
perfect steterim steterīs steterit steterīmus steterītis steterint
pluperfect stetissem stetissēs stetisset stetissēmus stetissētis stetissent
passive present stētur
imperfect stārētur
perfect statum sit
pluperfect statum esset,
statum foret
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present stā stāte
future stātō stātō stātōte stantō
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives stāre stetisse statūrum esse stārī statum esse
participles stāns statūrus statum standum
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
standī standō standum standō statum statū
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • sto”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • sto”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sto in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I am firmly resolved: stat mihi sententia (Liv. 21. 30.)
    • to insist on a point: tenere aliquid; stare in aliqua re
    • to abide by one's undertaking: promisso stare
    • a thing costs much, little: aliquid magno, parvo stat, constat
    • the state is secure: res publica stat (opp. iacet)
    • to be on a person's side (not ab alicuius partibus): ab (cum) aliquo stare (Brut. 79. 273)
    • the issue of the day was for a long time uncertain: diu anceps stetit pugna
    • the victory cost much blood and many wounds, was very dearly bought: victoria multo sanguine ac vulneribus stetit (Liv. 23. 30)
    • to ride at anchor: in ancoris esse, stare, consistere
    • (ambiguous) my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: meliorem in statum redigor
    • (ambiguous) to restore a man to his former position: aliquem in antiquum statum, in pristinum restituere
    • (ambiguous) a periodically recurring (annual) sacrifice: sacrificium statum (solemne) (Tusc. 1. 47. 113)
    • (ambiguous) to restore the ancient constitution: rem publicam in pristinum statum restituere
    • (ambiguous) to endanger the existence of the state: statum rei publicae convellere

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Italic *(s)ta(je)-tōd (must steal), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teh₂-, see also Hittite [script needed] (tāyezzi), [script needed] (tāyazzi, to steal), Old Irish táid (thief), Sanskrit तायु (tāyú, thief), Avestan 𐬙𐬁𐬫𐬎(tāyu, thief), Ancient Greek τητάω (tētáō, to deprive), τηΰσιος (tēǘsios, deceptive, (in) vain) (Doric τᾱΰσιος (tāǘsios)).[1]

Failed to survive for its homonymy with the ordinary verb for “stand" (see Etymology 1 above).[2]

Verb[edit]

stō (singular future active imperative statōd); first conjugation

  1. (Old Latin) to steal
    • 7th–5th century BC, Duenos inscription:
      𐌃𐌖𐌄𐌍𐌏𐌔𐌌𐌄𐌃𐌅𐌄𐌂𐌄𐌃𐌄𐌍𐌌𐌀𐌍𐌏𐌌𐌄𐌉𐌍𐌏𐌌𐌃𐌖𐌄𐌍𐌏𐌉𐌍𐌄𐌌𐌄𐌃𐌌𐌀𐌋𐌏𐌔𐌕𐌀𐌕𐌏𐌃
      DVENOSMEDFECEDENMANOMEINOMDVENOINEMEDMALOSTATOD
      duenos mēd fēced en mānōm (m)einom duenōi nē mēd malo(s) statōd
      A good man made me (in good intention?) for a good man; may I not be stolen by an evil man.

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “(s)ta”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 584
  2. ^ H. Rix, "Das letzte Wort der Duenos-Inschrif", MSS, 46, 1985, pp. 193 ff.; H. Eichner, "Reklameniamben aus Roms Königszeit", Die Sprache, 34, 1988-90, p. 216.

Ligurian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iste.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sto (feminine singular sta, masculine plural sti, feminine plural ste)

  1. this
  2. (in the plural) these

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Numeral[edit]

sto

  1. hundred (100)

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sto

  1. simple past of stå

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse stóð. Related to stå.

Noun[edit]

sto f (definite singular stoa, indefinite plural stoer, definite plural stoene)

  1. A resting place for critters.

Noun[edit]

sto n (definite singular stoet, indefinite plural sto, definite plural stoa)

  1. A herd of mares and one or more stallions.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sto

  1. (non-standard since 2012) past tense of stå

References[edit]

  • “sto” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “sto”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016

Anagrams[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sto

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
Polish numbers (edit)
1000
 ←  99 100
10
    Cardinal: sto
    Ordinal: setny

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

sto

  1. one hundred

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sto in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sto in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Serbo-Croatian numbers (edit)
1000[a], [b]
100
10
    Cardinal: sto
    Ordinal: stoti
    Adverbial: stoput
    Multiplier: stostruk
    Collective: stotoro
    Fractional: stotina

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

stȏ (Cyrillic spelling сто̑)

  1. hundred
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *stolъ.

Doublet of àstāl, from the same ultimate source only borrowed through Hungarian.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stȏ m (Cyrillic spelling сто̑)

  1. (Bosnia, Serbia) table
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

sto

  1. hundred (100)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Usually not declined when used in conjunction with other numerals.

Further reading[edit]

  • sto in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene[edit]

Slovene cardinal numbers
 <  99 100 101  > 
    Cardinal : stó
    Ordinal : stôti
    Adverbial : stókrat

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

stọ̑

  1. hundred

Inflection[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish stōþ, from Old Norse stóð, from Proto-Germanic *stōdą. Compare Icelandic stóð.

Noun[edit]

sto n

  1. mare (female horse)

Declension[edit]

Declension of sto 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sto stoet ston stona
Genitive stos stoets stons stonas

Synonyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Upper Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъto.

Numeral[edit]

sto

  1. hundred (100)