sot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: söt, sőt, søt, sốt, sọt, şot, soț, sót, soot, and Sot

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

sot

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Sotho.

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sot, from Old English sot, sott (foolish, stupid), of obscure origin and relation. Compare Middle Low German sot (insane, foolish, stupid), Middle Dutch sot ("foolish, absurd, stupid"; > modern Dutch zot (silly)), French sot (stupid, foolish, goofy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (plural sots)

  1. (archaic) stupid person; fool
  2. drunkard
    • 1684, Wentworth Dillon, 4th Earl of Roscommon, Essay on Translated Verse
      Every sign
      That calls the staring sots to nasty wine.
    • April 21, 1864, John Ruskin, "Traffic", Unto This Last and Other Writings, New York: Penguin (1997), p. 235
      Take a picture by Teniers, of sots quarrelling over their dice; it is an entirely clever picture; so clever that nothing in its kind has ever been done equal to it; but it is also an entirely base and evil picture.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

sot (third-person singular simple present sots, present participle sotting, simple past and past participle sotted)

  1. To drink until one becomes drunk
  2. To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar: Or, the Double Discovery. [], London: [] Richard Tonson and Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 6484883, (please specify the page number):
      I hate to see a brave, bold fellow sotted.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *tˢjādīti, from a Pre-Albanian (post-Proto-Indo-European) *ḱyeh₂ dh₂itéy dative-locative compound, literally "this day". Same type of construction as sonte, sivjet. See also ditë, which is related to the second component.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. today

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a pre-Roman root *(t)sott-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot m (plural sots)

  1. hollow
  2. pit, hole
  3. grave

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exsūctus (compare Italian asciutto, Venetian suto, Friulian sut, Spanish enjuto, Portuguese enxuto) or Latin suctus (compare Romanian supt).

Adjective[edit]

sot

  1. dry

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz, cognate with Norwegian sott, Swedish sot (archaic), German Sucht. Derived from the verb *seukaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /soːˀt/, [ˈsoˀd̥]

Noun[edit]

sot c (singular definite soten, plural indefinite soter)

  1. (dated) disease

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Faliscan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Latin sunt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sōt

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of esu

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French sot, from Old French soz, from Medieval Latin sottus (foolish), of uncertain ultimate origin. Possibly an expressive interjection, similar to modern zut! (damn it!). This Latin word was borrowed into Germanic languages such as Dutch zot, Old English sott (modern English sot).[1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sot (feminine sotte, masculine plural sots, feminine plural sottes)

  1. silly, foolish, stupid

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot m (plural sots, feminine sotte)

  1. imbecile, fool

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Metzler, I. (2015). Fools and Idiots? Intellectual Disability in the Middle Ages. United States: Manchester University Press.
  2. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “zot”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin subtus, which is derived from Latin sub. Cognate to Ladin sot, Romansch sut, suot, Venetian sóto, Italian sotto, French sous, Romanian sub, supt.

Preposition[edit]

sot

  1. under, beneath, underneath
  2. below, south of

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. down
  2. underneath
  3. below

Derived terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin subtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. under, beneath
  2. below

Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sot

  1. inflection of soen:
    1. second-person plural present/preterite indicative
    2. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    3. second-person plural imperative

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sot, sott, from Medieval Latin sottus, reinforced by Old French sot (idiotic), of obscure origin. Possibly an expressive interjection, similar to modern French zut! (damn it!).[1][2]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (plural sottes or (Early ME) sotten)

  1. One who lacks wisdom, knowledge, or intelligence; a stupid person.
  2. A villainous or dishonest individual; a rogue or scoundrel.
  3. (derogatory) Used as a general-purpose insult.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: sot
  • Scots: sot
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sot (plural and weak singular sotte)

  1. idiotic, unwise
References[edit]
  1. ^ Metzler, I. (2015). Fools and Idiots? Intellectual Disability in the Middle Ages. United States: Manchester University Press.
  2. ^ van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “zot”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sōt.

Noun[edit]

sot

  1. Alternative form of soot (soot)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun[edit]

sot f or m (definite singular sota or soten, uncountable)
sot n (definite singular sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun[edit]

sot f or n (definite singular sota or sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sōtą, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōt n

  1. soot

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōt f

  1. sickness

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • sot in Knut Fredrik Söderwall, Ordbok öfver svenska medeltids-språket, del 2:1: M-T

Scots[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. so (to contradict a negative clause)
    • 1897, J. Mackinnon, Braefoot Sketches:
      “I wisna a grain feart.” “Ye wis sot. Ye ran like the rest o's.”
      “I wasn't scared at all.” “You was so. You ran like the rest of us.”

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun[edit]

sot n

  1. soot
Declension[edit]
Declension of sot 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot sotet
Genitive sots sotets
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz.

Noun[edit]

sot c

  1. (archaic) disease, sickness
Declension[edit]
Declension of sot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot soten soter soterna
Genitive sots sotens soters soternas
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1. sot in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)
  • 2. sot in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)

Anagrams[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (nominative plural sots)

  1. a sort
  2. a kind
  3. a type

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Zoogocho Zapotec[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish azote, from Arabic السَوْط(as-sawṭ, the whip).

Noun[edit]

sot

  1. whip
  2. whipping, beating

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 273