sot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: söt, sőt, søt, sốt, sọt, şot, soț, sót, soot, and Sot

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sot, from Old English sot, sott (foolish, stupid), of obscure origin and relation. Compare Dutch zot (silly), French sot.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (plural sots)

  1. (archaic) stupid person; fool
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, act 3 scene 2
      Remember / First to possess his books; for without them / He's but a sot, as I am []
    • (Can we date this quote by Oldham and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      In Egypt oft has seen the Sot bow down, / And reverence some deified Baboon.
  2. drunkard
    • (Can we date this quote by Roscommon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Every sign / That calls the staring sots to nasty wine.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

sot (third-person singular simple present sots, present participle sotting, simple past and past participle sotted)

  1. To drink until one becomes drunk
  2. To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dryden and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      I hate to see a brave, bold fellow sotted.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *tˢjādīti, from Pre-Albanian (post-Proto-Indo-European) *ḱyeh₂ dh₂itéy, dative-locative compound, literally ‘this day’. Same type of construction as sonte, sivjet. See ditë, which is related to the second component.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. today

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot m (plural sots)

  1. pit

Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin exsūctus (compare Italian asciutto, Venetian suto, Friulian sut, Spanish enjuto, Portuguese enxuto) or Latin suctus (compare Romanian supt).

Adjective[edit]

sot

  1. dry

Faliscan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Latin sunt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sōt

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of esu

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French sot, from Old French soz, from Medieval Latin sottus (foolish), of uncertain origin, possibly a Semitic borrowing: Aramaic [script needed] (s(h)ote, fool), Hebrew שטן(sat, transgressor, rebel) or [script needed] (s(h)atooy, drunk), [script needed] (s(h)atyan, drunkard).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /so/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

sot (feminine singular sotte, masculine plural sots, feminine plural sottes)

  1. silly, foolish, stupid

Noun[edit]

sot m (plural sots, feminine sotte)

  1. imbecile, fool

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  • Mozeson, Isaac (2000): The Word: The Dictionary That Reveals the Hebrew Source of English

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin subtus, which is derived from Latin sub. Cognate to Ladin sot, Romansch sut, suot, Venetian sóto, Italian sotto, French sous, Romanian sub, supt.

Preposition[edit]

sot

  1. under, beneath, underneath
  2. below, south of

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. down
  2. underneath
  3. below

Derived terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin subtus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adverb[edit]

sot

  1. under, beneath
  2. below

Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

sot

  1. inflection of soen:
    1. second-person plural present/preterite indicative
    2. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    3. second-person plural imperative

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sot, sott, of obscure origin.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (plural sottes or (Early ME) sotten)

  1. One who lacks wisdom, knowledge, or intelligence; a stupid person.
  2. A villainous or dishonest individual; a rogue or scoundrel.
  3. (derogatory) Used as a general-purpose insult.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: sot
  • Scots: sot
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sot (plural and weak singular sotte)

  1. idiotic, unwise
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sōt.

Noun[edit]

sot

  1. Alternative form of soot (soot)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sót

Noun[edit]

sot f or m (definite singular sota or soten, uncountable)
sot n (definite singular sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sót

Noun[edit]

sot f or n (definite singular sota or sotet, uncountable)

  1. soot

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sōtą, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōt n

  1. soot

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōt f

  1. sickness

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sót, from Proto-Germanic *sōtą.

Noun[edit]

sot n

  1. soot

Declension[edit]

Declension of sot 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot sotet
Genitive sots sotets

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish sōt, from Old Norse sótt, from Proto-Germanic *suhtiz

Noun[edit]

sot c

  1. (archaic) disease, sickness

Declension[edit]

Declension of sot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sot soten soter soterna
Genitive sots sotens soters soternas

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sot (nominative plural sots)

  1. a sort
  2. a kind
  3. a type

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Zoogocho Zapotec[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish azote, from Arabic السَوْط‎(as-sawṭ, the whip).

Noun[edit]

sot

  1. whip
  2. whipping, beating

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 273