sod

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See also: SOD, SoD, sód, sød, soð, and sođ

English[edit]

Workers laying sod.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sod, sodde first attested in the mid-15th century, from Middle Dutch zoden (turf) or Middle Low German sôde, soede (turf), both related to Dutch zode (turf), German Sode (turf), Old Frisian sātha (sod), all being of uncertain ultimate origin.

Noun[edit]

sod (plural sods)

  1. (uncountable) That stratum of the surface of the soil which is filled with the roots of grass, or any portion of that surface; turf; sward.
    • 1746, William Collins, Ode written in the year 1746:
      She there shall dress a sweeter sod / Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.
  2. (uncountable) Turf grown and cut specifically for the establishment of lawns.
    The landscapers rolled sod onto the bare earth and made a presentable lawn by nightfall.
  3. (countable) A piece of this.
    • 1890, James George Frazer, The Golden Bough, volume 2, page 338:
      In Walachia, green sods are laid on the window-sills and on the lintels of the doors to avert the uncanny crew [i.e. witches].
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sod (third-person singular simple present sods, present participle sodding, simple past and past participle sodded)

  1. To cover with sod.
    He sodded the worn areas twice a year.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of sodomite or sodomize.

Noun[edit]

sod (plural sods)

  1. (Britain, Ireland, vulgar) Sodomite; bugger.
    • 1998, Sarah Waters, Tipping the Velvet, Virago (2018), page 207:
      The Empire, in particular, was always thick with sods: they strolled side-by-side with the gay girls of the promenade, or stood, in little knots, exchanging gossip, comparing fortunes, greeting one another with flapping hands and high, extravagant voices.
  2. (Britain, Ireland, slang, mildly derogatory, formerly considered vulgar) A person; often qualified with an adjective.
    You mean old sod!
    poor sod
    unlucky sod
    You silly sod
  3. (Britain, Ireland, mildly vulgar) Any trifling amount, a bugger, a damn, a jot.
    I don’t care a sod.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sod

  1. (UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, vulgar) expression of surprise, contempt, outrage, disgust, boredom, frustration.

Verb[edit]

sod (third-person singular simple present sods, present participle sodding, simple past and past participle sodded)

  1. (transitive, Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, slang, vulgar) Bugger; sodomize.
  2. (transitive, Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, slang, vulgar) Damn, curse, confound.
    Sod him!, Sod it!, Sod that bastard!
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From the Old English plural past tense, or a back-formation from the past participle sodden.

Verb[edit]

sod

  1. (obsolete) simple past of seethe

Adjective[edit]

sod (comparative more sod, superlative most sod)

  1. (obsolete) Boiled.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC:
      , New York, 2001, p.223:
      Beer, if it be over-new, or over-stale, over-strong, or not sod, [] is most unwholesome, frets, and galls, etc.
  2. (Australia, of bread) Sodden; incompletely risen.
    sod damper

Noun[edit]

sod (plural sods)

  1. (Australia, colloquial) A damper (bread) which has failed to rise, remaining a flat lump.
    • 1954, Tom Ronan, Vision Splendid; quoted in Tom Burton, Words in Your Ear, Wakefield Press, 1999, →ISBN, page 120:
      And Mart the cook the shovel took / And swung the damper to and fro. / 'Another sod, so help me God, / That's fourteen in a flamin' row.

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

sod (plural sods)

  1. The rock dove.

Anagrams[edit]

Breton[edit]

Noun[edit]

sod m

  1. imbecile

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sót (soot).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sod c (singular definite soden, not used in plural form)

  1. soot

Verb[edit]

sod

  1. imperative of sode

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian sodo, from Latin solidus. Doublet of solidu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sod (feminine singular soda, plural sodi)

  1. firm; steadfast

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse soð. Doublet of sodd.

Noun[edit]

sod n (definite singular sodet, indefinite plural sod, definite plural soda)

  1. boiling, bubbling
  2. broth
  3. meat soup

References[edit]

Slovene[edit]

Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sǫdъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sọ̑d m inan

  1. barrel

Inflection[edit]

The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. sód
gen. sing. sóda
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
sód sóda sódi
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
sóda sódov sódov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
sódu sódoma sódom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
sód sóda sóde
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
sódu sódih sódih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
sódom sódoma sódi
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem, plural in -ôv-
nom. sing. sód
gen. sing. sóda
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
sód sodôva sodôvi
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
sóda sodôv sodôv
dative
(dajȃlnik)
sódu sodôvoma sodôvom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
sód sodôva sodôve
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
sódu sodôvih sodôvih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
sódom sodôvoma sodôvi

Further reading[edit]

  • sod”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sod (nominative plural sods)

  1. sauce

Declension[edit]