disgust

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French desgouster, from Old French desgouster (to put off one's appetite), from des- (dis-) + gouster, goster (to taste), from Latin gustus (a tasting).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: dĭs-gŭstʹ
  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈɡʌst/, [dɪsˈkʌst]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌst
  • Hyphenation: dis‧gust
  • Homophone: discussed

Verb[edit]

disgust (third-person singular simple present disgusts, present participle disgusting, simple past and past participle disgusted)

  1. To cause an intense dislike for something.
    It disgusts me to see her chew with her mouth open.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: [], London: [] [R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] [], published 1602, OCLC 316392309, Act III, scene iv:
      Tuc[ca]. [] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough? / Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him. / Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: []
    • 1819, William Thomas Moncrief, Rochester; or, King Charles the Second’s Merry Days: A Burletta, in Three Acts. [], London: Printed for John Lowndes, [], page 24:
      Mud This is a very specious piece of business; and above my implication—Dear me—dear me—what a thing it is, that one never can disgust one’s meals in peace—but one must be torn piecemeal with defamations—convocations—and other informalities—If I’d any of the fees and requisites of office for my pains—it would be a different thing—but every body knows I’m an ignoramous, and commit justice gratis—I must disperse the complaint.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      It is impossible to convey, in words, any idea of the hideous phantasmagoria of shifting limbs and faces which moved through the evil-smelling twilight of this terrible prison-house. Callot might have drawn it, Dante might have suggested it, but a minute attempt to describe its horrors would but disgust.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

disgust (uncountable)

  1. An intense dislike or loathing someone feels for something bad or nasty.
    With an air of disgust, she stormed out of the room.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

dis- +‎ gust

Noun[edit]

disgust m (plural disgusts or disgustos)

  1. displeasure
    Antonym: plaer

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]