jot

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Jot and jót

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin iōta, from Ancient Greek ἰῶτα (iôta). Doublet of iota.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jot (plural jots)

  1. Iota; the smallest letter or stroke of any writing.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Matthew 5:18, column 1:
      For verily I ſay vnto you, Till heauen and earth paſſe, one iote or one tittle, ſhall in no wiſe paſſe from the law, till all be fulfilled.
    • 1904, Bliss Carman, “Christmas Eve at St. Kavin’s” in Pipes of Pan: Songs from a Northern Garden, Boston: L.C. Page, p. 107,[1]
      Of old, men said, “Sin not;
      By every line and jot
      Ye shall abide; man’s heart is false and vile.”
  2. A small amount, bit; the smallest amount.
    He didn't care a jot for his work.
  3. (obsolete) A moment, an instant.
  4. A brief and hurriedly written note.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 53:
      "I say, it is no uneven jot, to pass from the more faint and obscure examples of Spermatical life to the more considerable effects of general Motion in Minerals, Metalls, and sundry Meteors ..."
    • 1920, Robert Nichols, “Sonnets to Aurelia, IV” in Aurelia and Other Poems, London: Chatto & Windus, p. 29,[6]
      “Lover,” you say; “how beautiful that is,
      That little word!” []
      Yes, it is beautiful. I have marked it long,
      Long in my dusty head its jot secreted,
      Yet my heart never knew this word a song
      Till in the night softly by you repeated.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

jot (third-person singular simple present jots, present participle jotting, simple past and past participle jotted)

  1. (usually with "down") To write quickly.
    Tell me your order, so I can jot it down.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.


Anagrams[edit]


Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • got (northern Moselle Franconian)
  • gut (southern Moselle Franconian)

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German guod, northern variant of guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

jot (masculine jode, feminine jot, comparative besser, superlative et beste)

  1. (Ripuarian) good

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *jo. Cognate to Finnish jotta.

Conjunction[edit]

jot

  1. so that, in order that

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

jot

  1. inflection of joen:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Rayón Zoque[edit]

Noun[edit]

jot

  1. bird

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Harrison, Roy; B. de Harrison, Margaret; López Juárez, Francisco; Ordoñes, Cosme (1984) Vocabulario zoque de Rayón (Serie de diccionarios y vocabularios indígenas Mariano Silva y Aceves; 28)‎[7] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 10