jade

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Jade, jáde, jäde, jadę, јаде, and яде

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A jadeite ball

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒeɪd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank). (Jade was thought to cure pains in the side.)[1]

Noun[edit]

jade (usually uncountable, plural jades)

  1. A semiprecious stone, either nephrite or jadeite, generally green or white in color, often used for carving figurines.
    Synonyms: jadestone, jade stone, yu
    • 2012 March 1, Lee A. Groat, “Gemstones”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 128:
      Although there are dozens of different types of gems, among the best known and most important are diamond, ruby and sapphire, emerald and other gem forms of the mineral beryl, chrysoberyl, tanzanite, tsavorite, topaz and jade.
  2. A bright shade of slightly bluish or greyish green, typical of polished jade stones.
    jade:  
    Synonym: jade green
  3. A succulent plant, Crassula ovata.
    Synonyms: jade plant, lucky plant, money plant, money tree
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
  • Appendix:Colors
  • Adjective[edit]

    jade (not comparable)

    1. Of a grayish shade of green, typical of jade stones.

    Etymology 2[edit]

    From Middle English jade, chade, either a variant of yaud[2] or merely influenced by it. Yaud derives from Old Norse jalda (mare), from a Uralic language, such as Moksha эльде (elʹde) or Erzya эльде (elʹde).[3][4] See yaud for more.

    Noun[edit]

    jade (plural jades)

    1. A horse too old to be put to work.
      Synonyms: nag, yaud
      • c. 1590–1591, William Shakespeare, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene i], page 30, column 2:
        Shee hath more qualities then a Water-Spaniell, [] Shee can fetch and carry: why a horſe can doe no more; nay, a horſe cannot fetch, but onely carry, therefore is ſhee better then a Iade.
      • 1759, [Laurence Sterne], chapter X, in The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, volume I, 2nd (1st London) edition, London: [] R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley [], published 1760, OCLC 976409157, page 36:
        Let that be as it may, as my purpoſe is to do exact juſtice to every creature brought upon the ſtage of this dramatic work,—I could not ſtifle this diſtinction in favour of Don Quixote’s horſe;—in all other points the parſon’s horſe, I ſay, was juſt ſuch another,—for he was as lean, and as lank, and as ſorry a jade, as Humility herſelf could have beſtrided.
      • 1817 December, [Jane Austen], chapter X, in Northanger Abbey; published in Northanger Abbey: And Persuasion. [], volume I, London: John Murray, [], 1818, OCLC 318384910, page 201:
        My horse would have trotted to Clifton within the hour, if left to himself, and I have almost broke my arm with pulling him in to that cursed broken-winded jade’s pace.
      • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H. L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 55:
        The king had no other horse to give him but an old jade, for his six brothers and their men had taken all the other horses, but Ashiepattle did not mind that; he mounted the shabby old nag.
    2. (especially derogatory) A bad-tempered or disreputable woman.
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:shrew
    Translations[edit]

    Verb[edit]

    jade (third-person singular simple present jades, present participle jading, simple past and past participle jaded) (transitive)

    1. To fatigue, tire, or weary (someone or something).
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:tire
      • a. 1705, John Locke, “Of the Conduct of the Understanding”, in Posthumous Works of Mr. John Locke: [], London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], published 1706, OCLC 6963663, § 27, page 84:
        [T]he Mind once jaded by an attempt above its Power, it either is diſabl'd for the future, or elſe checks at any vigorous Undertaking ever after, at leaſt is very hardly brought to exert its Force again on any Subject that requires Thought and Meditation.
    2. (obsolete) To treat (someone or something) like a jade; to spurn.
    3. (obsolete) To make (someone or something) contemptible and ridiculous.
    Derived terms[edit]
    Translations[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “jade”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
    2. ^ Eric Partridge, Origins: A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English →ISBN, 2006)
    3. ^ Per Thorson, Anglo-Norse studies: an inquiry into the Scandinavian elements in the modern English dialects, volume 1 (1936), page 52: "Yad sb. Sc Nhb Lakel Yks Lan, also in forms yaad, yaud, yawd, yoad, yod(e).... [jad, o] 'a work-horse, a mare' etc. ON jalda 'made', Sw. dial. jäldä, from Finnish elde (FT p. 319, Torp p. 156 fol.). Eng. jade is not related."
    4. ^ Saga Book of the Viking Society for Northern Research, page 18: "There is thus no etymological connection between ME. jāde MnE. jade and ME. jald MnE. dial. yaud etc. But the two words have influenced each other mutually, both formally and semantically."

    Danish[edit]

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    jade c (singular definite jaden, uncountable)

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    Finnish[edit]

    Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia fi

    Pronunciation[edit]

    • IPA(key): /ˈjɑde/, [ˈjɑde̞]
    • Rhymes: -ɑde
    • Syllabification: ja‧de

    Noun[edit]

    jade

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    Declension[edit]

    Inflection of jade (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
    nominative jade jadet
    genitive jaden jadejen
    partitive jadea jadeja
    illative jadeen jadeihin
    singular plural
    nominative jade jadet
    accusative nom. jade jadet
    gen. jaden
    genitive jaden jadejen
    jadeinrare
    partitive jadea jadeja
    inessive jadessa jadeissa
    elative jadesta jadeista
    illative jadeen jadeihin
    adessive jadella jadeilla
    ablative jadelta jadeilta
    allative jadelle jadeille
    essive jadena jadeina
    translative jadeksi jadeiksi
    instructive jadein
    abessive jadetta jadeitta
    comitative jadeineen
    Possessive forms of jade (type nalle)
    possessor singular plural
    1st person jadeni jademme
    2nd person jadesi jadenne
    3rd person jadensa

    French[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    Rebracketed from earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. jade

    Descendants[edit]

    • Catalan: jade
    • English: jade
    • German: Jade
    • Italian: giada
    • Portuguese: jade
    • Romanian: jad
    • Spanish: jade

    Further reading[edit]

    Anagrams[edit]


    Portuguese[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    From French le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. jade (gem)

    Serbo-Croatian[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    jade (Cyrillic spelling јаде)

    1. vocative singular of jad

    Spanish[edit]

    Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia es

    Etymology[edit]

    From French jade, back formation from le jade, rebracketing of earlier l'ejade (jade), from Spanish piedra de ijada (literally flank stone), via Vulgar Latin *iliata from Latin ilia (flank) (jade was thought to cure pains in the side).

    Pronunciation[edit]

    • IPA(key): /ˈxade/, [ˈxa.ð̞e]

    Noun[edit]

    jade m (plural jades)

    1. (mineralogy) jade

    Derived terms[edit]

    Anagrams[edit]

    Further reading[edit]


    Yoruba[edit]

    Etymology[edit]

    From +‎ òde.

    Pronunciation[edit]

    Verb[edit]

    jáde

    1. to go out