Gaul

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French Gaule(Gaul), from Middle French Gaule(Gaul), from Old French Gaule, Waulle(Gaul), a word used as a translation of Latin Gallia(Gaul), from Frankish *Walhaland(Gaul, Land of the Romans, foreigners), from *Walha(foreigners, Romans, Celts), from Proto-Germanic *walhaz(an outlander, foreigner, Celt), probably of Celtic origin, from the same source as Latin Volcae(name of a Celtic tribe in South Germany, which later emmigrated to Gaul). Akin to Old High German Walh, Walah(a Celt, Roman, Gaul), Old English Wealh, Walh(a non-Germanic foreigner, Celt/Briton/Welshman), Old Norse Valir(Gauls, Frenchmen). More at Wales/Welsh, Cornwall, Walloon, and Vlach/Wallachia.

Despite their similar appearance, Latin Gallia is probably not the origin of French Gaule; the similarity is purely coincidental. According to regular sound changes in the development of Old French, Latin g before a becomes j (compare gamba, whence jambe), and the i of terminal -ia transpositions to the preceding syllable (compare gloire from gloria). Thus, the regular outcome of Latin Gallia is Jaille, a component still seen in several French placenames (e.g. La Jaille-Yvon, Saint-Mars-la-Jaille, etc).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

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Gaul

  1. A Roman-era region roughly corresponding to modern France and Belgium

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

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Wikipedia

Gaul ‎(plural Gauls)

  1. A person from Gaul.

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul m ‎(genitive Gaules or Gauls, plural Gäule)

  1. (regional) horse
  2. (more widespread) hack, nag (bad, old or incapable horse)

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Gaul in Duden online

Plautdietsch[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul f ‎(plural Gaule)

  1. gall