Gaul

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See also: gaul

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French Gaule (Gaul), from Middle French Gaule (Gaul), from Old French Gaule, Waulle (Gaul, a term used to translate unrelated Latin Gallia (Gaul)), from Frankish *Walha(land) (Gaul, Land of the Romans, foreigners), from Proto-West Germanic *walh (foreigner, Roman, Celt), from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (an outlander, foreigner, Celt), probably of Celtic origin, from the same source as Latin Volcae (name of a Celtic tribe in South Germany, which later emigrated to Gaul). Akin to Old High German Walh, Walah (a Celt, Roman, Gaul), Old English Wealh, Walh (a non-Germanic foreigner, Celt/Briton/Welshman), Old Norse Valir (Gauls, Frenchmen). More at Wales/Welsh, Cornwall, Walloon, and Vlach/Wallachia.

Despite their similar appearance, Latin Gallia is not the origin of French Gaule; the similarity is purely coincidental. According to regular sound changes in the phonetic development of Old French, Latin g before a becomes j (compare gamba, whence jambe), and the i of terminal -ia transposes to the preceding syllable (compare gloire from gloria). Thus, the regular outcome of Latin Gallia is Jaille, a component still seen in several French placenames (e.g. La Jaille-Yvon, Saint-Mars-la-Jaille, etc.).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Gaul

  1. (geography, chiefly historical) A region recognised throughout the Antiquity and the Middle Ages, roughly corresponding to modern France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, and parts of Northern Italy (Lombardy), the Netherlands, and Germany, particularly the west bank of the Rhine
    Hypernyms: (historical) Celtic Gaul, Belgic Gaul, Aquitaine, Cisalpine Gaul, Transalpine Gaul, Gallia Narbonensis

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Gaul (plural Gauls)

  1. A person from Gaul.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl. Cognate with Dutch guil (old horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (genitive Gaules or Gauls, plural Gäule)

  1. (regional) horse
  2. (more widespread) hack, nag (bad, old or incapable horse)
    Synonym: Klepper

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Gaul” in Duden online

Hunsrik[edit]

En Gaul

Alternative forms[edit]

  • kaul (Wiesemann spelling system)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl. Cognate with German Gaul

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (plural Geil, diminutive Geilche)

  1. horse
    Die Geil sin schnell.
    The horses are fast.

Further reading[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl. Cognate with German Gaul, Middle Low German gûl, and Dutch guil (old horse).

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (plural Geil)

  1. horse

Plautdietsch[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul f (plural Gaule)

  1. gall, bile