Gaul

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See also: gaul

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French Gaule (Gaul), from Middle French Gaule (Gaul), from Old French Gaule, Waulle (Gaul, a term used to translate unrelated Latin Gallia (Gaul)), from Frankish *Walha(land) (Gaul, Land of the Romans, foreigners), from Proto-West Germanic *walh (foreigner, Roman, Celt), from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (an outlander, foreigner, Celt), probably of Celtic origin, from the same source as Latin Volcae (name of a Celtic tribe in South Germany, which later emigrated to Gaul). Akin to Old High German Walh, Walah (a Celt, Roman, Gaul), Old English Wealh, Walh (a non-Germanic foreigner, Celt/Briton/Welshman), Old Norse Valir (Gauls, Frenchmen). More at Wales/Welsh, Cornwall, Walloon, and Vlach/Wallachia.

Despite their similar appearance, Latin Gallia is not the origin of French Gaule. During the evolution from Latin to French, stressed initial /ˈɡa-/ yielded /dʒa/ > /ʒa/ (cf. Latin gamba > French jambe), while unstressed final /-lia/ yielded /ʎə/ > /j/ (cf. Latin filia > French fille). Thus, the regular outcome of Latin Gallia is /ʒaj/ ⟨Jaille⟩, which is attested in several French toponyms: La Jaille-Yvon, Saint-Mars-la-Jaille, etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Gaul

  1. (geography, chiefly historical) A historical region roughly corresponding to modern France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, and parts of Northern Italy (Lombardy), the Netherlands, and Germany west of the Rhine.
    Hypernyms: (historical) Celtic Gaul, Belgic Gaul, Aquitaine, Cisalpine Gaul, Transalpine Gaul, Gallia Narbonensis

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Gaul (plural Gauls)

  1. A person from Gaul.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl, of obscure ultimate origin, but possibly ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *geutan (to pour, cast), referring to a powerful male horse, a "seed-pouring animal."[1] Cognate with Dutch guil (old horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (strong, genitive Gaules or Gauls, plural Gäule)

  1. (regional) horse
  2. (more widespread) hack, nag (bad, old or incapable horse)
    Synonym: Klepper

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries (1971), Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek, Leiden

Further reading[edit]

  • Gaul” in Duden online
  • Gaul” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hunsrik[edit]

En Gaul

Alternative forms[edit]

  • kaul (Wiesemann spelling system)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl, of obscure ultimate origin, but possibly ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *geutan (to pour, cast), referring to a powerful male horse, a "seed-pouring animal." Cognate with German Gaul.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (plural Geil, diminutive Geilche)

  1. horse
    Die Geil sin schnell.
    The horses are fast.

Further reading[edit]


Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German gūl, of obscure ultimate origin, but possibly ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *geutan (to pour, cast), referring to a powerful male horse, a "seed-pouring animal." Cognate with German Gaul, Middle Low German gûl, and Dutch guil (old horse).

Noun[edit]

Gaul m (plural Geil)

  1. horse

Plautdietsch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German galle, from Old Saxon galla, from Proto-West Germanic *gallā, from Proto-Germanic *gallǭ.

Noun[edit]

Gaul f (plural Gaule)

  1. gall, bile