jambe

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English jambe, jaumbe, French jambe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jambe (plural jambes)

  1. (heraldry) A leg.
    • 1844, John Burke, Bernard Burke, Encyclopædia of Heraldry: Or General Armory of England, Scotland, and Ireland, Comprising a Registry of All Armorial Bearings from the Earliest to the Present Time, Including the Late Grants by the College of Arms
      Crest - A jambe, unarmed, excepting the spur, quarterly, or and sa.
    • 1847, Henry Gough, A Glossary of Terms Used in British Heraldry: With a Chronological Table, Illustrative of Its Rise and Progress, page 171:
      If couped or erased at the middle joint, it is not a jambe but a paw.
      Or, a lion's jambe inverted and erased in bend gules. Powis. Gules, three lion's jambes erased and inverted argent.
    • 1902, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Works of A. Conan Doyle: The white company, page 167:
      “Over all, on an escutcheon of the first, a jambe gules.” “A jambe gules erased,” said Sir Nigel, shaking his head solemnly. “Yet it is not amiss for a monkbred man. I trust that you are lowly and serviceable?”
  2. (often in the plural) Synonym of jambeau (a greave).
    • 1860 August 18, Punch, Or, The London Charivari, page 68:
      [] cuissarts or cuisses were used to shield the thigh, and boots of steel called greaves or jambes were worn upon the leg between the ancle[sic] and the knee. We have no doubt that the jambes were found to act well as preserves, but we think at times the shin must have been sadly jammed in them.
    • 1893, Archaeologia Cambrensis: The Journal of the Cambrian Archoeological Association, page 272:
      The spurs are of the goad-form , and the spur-straps are partially covered by the greaves or jambes, which are so formed as to protect the instep and ankle-joints, and are ornamented round the lower edges with a row of studs.
    • 1910, George Clinch, English Costume from Prehistoric Times to the End of the Eighteenth Century, page 189:
      Bainbergs were the precursors of the steel greaves or jambes of the fourteenth century.

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

jambe

  1. (poetry) iamb

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French jambe, from Late Latin gamba, from Ancient Greek κάμπη (kámpē), from Proto-Indo-European *kamp- (to bend; crooked).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʒɑ̃b/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

jambe f (plural jambes)

  1. leg
    Il marche sur ses deux jambes.He walks with his two legs.
    par-dessus la jambeoff-handedly

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin gamba, from Ancient Greek κάμπη (kámpē).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jambe f (oblique plural jambes, nominative singular jambe, nominative plural jambes)

  1. leg

Derived terms[edit]

  • gambon
    • Middle English:
    • French: jambon (see there for further descendants)

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

jambe

  1. only used in me jambe, first-person singular present subjunctive of jambarse
  2. only used in se jambe, third-person singular present subjunctive of jambarse